[24hoursupport] Re: screen changing colors

  • From: yyixi001@xxxxxxxxxxxxxx
  • To: 24hoursupport@xxxxxxxxxxxxx
  • Date: Sun, 26 Oct 2003 14:02:46 -0600

 
Hi Lene,

Okay, here's what I think. I've got a book about repairing monitors. I'm
not an electrician. The book says you can, after a time, have some of
the soldered connections break through, while the wire remains in place
and the soldered joint looks solid. It's called a 'cold solder joint'
(why, don't ask me). Perhaps there is microscopic corrosion or dust, and
slapping the side jolts the cold joint and once it touches, it maintains
the connection somehow for the duration of the session. Then you switch
it off, and next time, same problem, you slap it again, it works for the
session, or maybe needs another slap now and then. 

I wrote to the guy who wrote the book and told him about my problem and
my guess that I had, as he described, a cold solder joint. He wrote
back;

quote; "In regards to your monitor problem, it sounds like you are
correct in your diagnosis of cold solder joints on the crt board. It is
an easy repair to make so it is definitely worth doing sometime. Good
luck with your endeavors."

The 'repair' consists of taking a fine point soldering iron, and
touching all the soldered joints on the crt board, remelting and
reconnecting them, permanently curing the problem. 

However, let's get a little dramatic here, and imagine that inside your
monitor case, once you open it, is a label of a skull & crossbones
grinning at you, and a warning notice 'DANGER - proceed at your own
risk'. There isn't, but there should be. If you look at the
funnel/cone-shaped monitor tube, there are two wires that go to either
side of the cone about halfway between the narrow and wide ends, and
disappear into a rubber cover about the size of a large round button.
Under that rubber cover, the bare wire ends contain enough static or
residual voltage, AFTER unplugging the monitor, to kill you. There are
other dangers. You must know them all, and what to do about them, before
opening and playing with all that fancy wiring and circuitry. This is in
Chapter One of the guy's book, the chapter on safety. If you want to buy
a copy of the book, it's only about $10 or $12 US, and his email address
is; tonyandreneej@xxxxxxxxxxx and his name is Tony Jomaa. 

The other end of the particular wire mentioned above (one on each side),
wherever it goes into the crt board or coil or whatever, could of course
also kill you. Some of his safety rules are, always keep one hand behind
your back while working on a monitor, so you don't touch it with both
hands at once, completing a closed circuit with your heart -the most
vulnerable part of your body to electric shock- in the middle of the
circuit. Always ground your monitor chassis before working on it. Always
wear rubber shoes to keep yourself ungrounded. Don't work on a carpet or
in dry dusty conditions as static electricity can kill your monitor
chips. Etc. etc.

Personally, I decided not to mess with it myself. I had the book, and
still do, and I knew what to do, but I think I'd rather play with
throwing rocks at beehives than fool with this kind of thing. So I just
kept happily slapping -as in 'slap happy' :)- my monitor several times
each time I started a computing session. Finally a neighbor said he had
an old monitor I could have for $10 and I was fixed up with a newer unit
with better shielding, and I keep the old slappy one as a spare. The
book made me better informed, and part of the way I used the information
was to decide not to play with monitor insides. I could, but what the
heck. 

Keep your eyes peeled for someone's used monitor and it will show up
sooner or later.

Roland



"Lene lpagsugu-at-yahoo.com |24hoursupport/1.0-Allow|" wrote:
> 
> 
> The connections seem snug at both ends.  I still have the yellow tones 
> occuring (I think the colors change depending on the color of the desktop b/c 
> when I log on my name and it occurs, it appears red).  The "slapping the 
> monitor" technique works, it flashes to normal whenever I whack it, sometimes 
> it works for a while, sometimes temporary.  I guess it's just time for a new 
> monitor :T
> yyixi001@xxxxxxxxxxxxxx wrote:
> Yes, what Gary says sounds most likely. I have an old backup monitor
> that I keep handy, and it regularly goes into all blue-tones like a
> black & white tv set only its blue & white instead of black & white, and
> I give it a few slaps on the side of the case and suddenly everything
> goes back to normal until the next time. Another possibility is that you
> have a magnet of some kind parked too close to the monitor, such as an
> old-time desktop telephone or speaker box, in which case, move it away
> asap. Please let us know what's going on with it next, this is rather
> interesting to me.
> 
> Roland
> 
> "GaryLetC-at-aol.com |24hoursupport/1.0-Allow|" wrote:
> >
> >
> > In a message dated 10/23/03 7:30:52 PM Central Daylight Time,
> > lpagsugu@xxxxxxxxx writes:
> >
> > << Something bizarre is happening to my computer screen. It recently
> > started changing colors >>
> >
> > There's a good chance of a loose connection---either at the
> > computer end, or the monitor end of the cable between the two.
> > Several other things can cause it, but this usually turns out to be
> > the case. Wiggle the cable at both ends (not at the same time)
> > and see if anything changes on the screen. Gary
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