[windows2000] Re: SV: Re: 192.168.*.* - why?

  • From: "Sullivan, Glenn" <GSullivan@xxxxxxxxxxxxxx>
  • To: "'windows2000@xxxxxxxxxxxxx'" <windows2000@xxxxxxxxxxxxx>
  • Date: Mon, 18 Nov 2002 13:29:02 -0500

If I do an NSLookup, and at the NSLookup prompt type 10.22.16.5 I get:
*** <DNS Server FQDN> can't find 10.22.16.5: Non-existent domain

I don't understand the rest of what you are talking about.

Let me give a totally different example of what I am talking about...

Scenario 1:
I decide to attempt to ping 10.10.10.10 from my machine.  Somehow, this ICMP
packet reaches an internet backbone router.  It will be dropped completely,
regardless of whether there is a DNS record associated with it or not.


Scenario 2:
Let's say I am in charge of the internet-authoritative DNS server for
DavidClark.com.  If you do a little checking, you will see that there is at
least one host record for DavidClark.com called www, and it maps to the
address: 155.212.1.28.  There is nothing stopping me from adding a host
record to my DNS server for the host name ROUTEME and an address of
10.10.10.10.

Now, if you, on your network, decide you want to ping
ROUTEME.DavidClark.com, the first thing your machine does is communicate
with your Primary (or secondary) DNS server to determine what the correct
address for ROUTEME.DavidClark.com is.  Your DNS server, through the
grapevine (IE, either directly, or recursively) hears from my DNS server
that ROUTEME.DavidClark.com is 10.10.10.10.

Your machine now attempts to ping 10.10.10.10.  Now we are back to scenario
1...  It no longer cares what the FQDN was.  It is attempting to contact the
address.

Lets say that somehow this ICMP ping packet hits an internet backbone
router.  It will be dropped unceremoniously, never to be seen again.

The result is the same: the packet is dropped.

It has absolutely nothing to do with DNS.  Nothing at all.

But I am not close-minded.  I am open to explanation...

Glenn Sullivan, MCSE+I  MCDBA
David Clark Company Inc.


-----Original Message-----
From: Jeff Stockard [mailto:JStockard@xxxxxxxxxxxxxxx]
Sent: Monday, November 18, 2002 1:04 PM
To: windows2000@xxxxxxxxxxxxx
Subject: [windows2000] Re: SV: Re: 192.168.*.* - why?



If you do an NSlookup and type in 10.22.16.5 (any 10 scheme that is not
in your route table), you will get the name and IP address of your
router.
If you change the 10 to 216 (for example, don't use that number if 216
is your address scheme)  you will get a DNS response DNS request timed
out.
The 10.x.x.x scheme stays within the explicit route table.  Without an
explicit route defined for it, an 10. address will be ignored by the
Internet DNS.
By itself the 10. address is not routable.  Because it is ignored by the
Internet DNS.

-----Original Message-----
From: Sullivan, Glenn [mailto:GSullivan@xxxxxxxxxxxxxx]=20
Sent: Monday, November 18, 2002 1:00 PM
To: windows2000@xxxxxxxxxxxxx
Subject: [windows2000] Re: SV: Re: 192.168.*.* - why?


Tom,

I understand that.  I was really asking Jeff how he believes that the
two
are inter-related...

HTH,

Glenn Sullivan, MCSE+I  MCDBA
David Clark Company Inc.


-----Original Message-----
From: Tom Erdely [mailto:tom@xxxxxxxxx]
Sent: Monday, November 18, 2002 12:48 PM
To: windows2000@xxxxxxxxxxxxx
Subject: [windows2000] SV: Re: 192.168.*.* - why?



Nothing.  These IP ranges (or any IP ranges for that matter) have no
effect on how DNS behaves (except for network, broadcast and multicast
ranges of course).  Whether they are for private use or not.

Hope that helps,

Tom Erdely
http://erdely.no


-----Opprinnelig melding-----
Fra: windows2000-bounce@xxxxxxxxxxxxx
[mailto:windows2000-bounce@xxxxxxxxxxxxx] P=3DE5 vegne av Sullivan, =
Glenn
Sendt: 18. november 2002 18:46
Til: 'windows2000@xxxxxxxxxxxxx'
Emne: [windows2000] Re: 192.168.*.* - why?



OK, but what does that have to do with DNS?  They don't mention DNS in
that blurb.

Glenn Sullivan, MCSE+I  MCDBA
David Clark Company Inc.


-----Original Message-----
From: Jeff Stockard [mailto:JStockard@xxxxxxxxxxxxxxx]
Sent: Monday, November 18, 2002 12:30 PM
To: windows2000@xxxxxxxxxxxxx
Subject: [windows2000] Re: 192.168.*.* - why?



From this site on IP addresses:
http://www.oreilly.com/catalog/coreprot/chapter/appb.html
Where it says "there are groups of "private" Internet addresses that can
be used on internal networks by anyone. These address pools were set
aside in RFC 1918, and therefore cannot be "assigned" to any
organization. The Internet's backbone routers are configured explicitly
not to route packets with these addresses, so they are completely
useless outside of an organization's internal network. The address
blocks available are listed in Table B-4." Any addresses in 10.x.x.x

-----Original Message-----
From: Daniel Ensor [mailto:densor@xxxxxxxxx]=3D3D20
Sent: Monday, November 18, 2002 11:59 AM
To: windows2000@xxxxxxxxxxxxx
Subject: [windows2000] Re: 192.168.*.* - why?


Dark N' snowy??

-----Original Message-----
From: Robert Funderburk [mailto:robfunderburk@xxxxxxxxxxx]
Sent: Monday, November 18, 2002 4:54 PM
To: windows2000@xxxxxxxxxxxxx
Subject: [windows2000] Re: 192.168.*.* - why?



What are you talking about with "outside DNS" ?


----- Original Message -----
From: "Jeff Stockard" <JStockard@xxxxxxxxxxxxxxx>
To: <windows2000@xxxxxxxxxxxxx>
Sent: Monday, November 18, 2002 10:52 AM
Subject: [windows2000] Re: 192.168.*.* - why?


>
> That was my point.  They don't have anything to do with outside DNS.
If
> you used an address that was in the outside DNS range, you would =
be=3D20
> continually looking to the DNS table to find other PC's on your
network.
>
> -----Original Message-----
> From: Sullivan, Glenn [mailto:GSullivan@xxxxxxxxxxxxxx]=3D3D3D20
> Sent: Monday, November 18, 2002 9:20 AM
> To: windows2000@xxxxxxxxxxxxx
> Subject: [windows2000] Re: 192.168.*.* - why?
>
>
> <----------Snip-------->
> Companies use theses schemes so their requests for data will not look
to
> the
> outside DNS list.  This makes the lookup a little faster, when you can

> skip the rest of the entire Internet and just look on your Intranet.
> <----------Snip-------->
>
> What do you mean?  These reserved address ranges really don't =
have=3D20
> anything to do with DNS, to my knowledge.
>
> A little confused I guess.  That's what happens when you wake up
with=3D20
> three inches of ice covering everything...
>
> Glenn Sullivan, MCSE+I  MCDBA
> David Clark Company Inc.
>
>
> -----Original Message-----
> From: Jeff Stockard [mailto:JStockard@xxxxxxxxxxxxxxx]
> Sent: Monday, November 18, 2002 9:12 AM
> To: windows2000@xxxxxxxxxxxxx
> Subject: [windows2000] Re: 192.168.*.* - why?
>
>
>
> They are non routable.  The same is true with 10.x.x.x.  Companies use

> theses schemes so their requests for data will not look to the outside

> DNS list.  This makes the lookup a little faster, when you can skip
the
> rest of the entire Internet and just look on your Intranet. Hope
this=3D20
> helps Jeff
> Jesus Loves You
>
> -----Original Message-----
> From: Costanzo, Ray [mailto:rcostanzo@xxxxxxxxxxx]=3D3D3D3D20
> Sent: Monday, November 18, 2002 8:59 AM
> To: windows2000@xxxxxxxxxxxxx
> Subject: [windows2000] 192.168.*.* - why?
>
>
> Hi list,
>
> I'm just curious about something.  It seems that most networks use
> 192.168.*.* for their internal addresses.  Why?  It doesn't =
really=3D20
> matter, does it?  Isn't 192.168.*.* completely arbitrary?  My theory
on
> how this came to be the norm is that MS used those addresses in
some=3D20
> samples in some books or something, and people started using that and
it
> just became the norm.  But then there's that whole Internet connection

> sharing feature that came out in what, W98SE?  With that, the computer

> that's sharing its Internet connection will be 192.168.1.1.  So, =
I=3D20
> imagine that it's coded somewhere into other OS'es to look to see
if=3D20
> 192.168.1.1 can be used as a gateway when the user does not specify an

> IP configuration.  So what came first?  192.168.*.* or computers
looking
> to 192.168.1.1 as a gateway?  Or what my real question is is why=3D20
> 192.168.*.*?
>
> Thanks,
>
> Ray at work
>
>
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