[vip_students] Re: Proofreading Symbols and Abbreviations

Tilde ~ is ANSI Code character 126, which is the lowercase of ^ carat which is ansi CHARACTER 94. (It's a bit like whether e-acute or e-grave: e-grave is the shifted e-acute accent.) On my admittedly old mobile, the carat key is not spoken in the list. and, are you sure that what Talks calls the tilde is actually the tilde? Perhaps you can produce the correct character using another facility, like numbers entry or something - tilde being on one of the extra keys> ----- Original Message ----- From: "Eleanor Burke" <eleanorburke@xxxxxxxxxxxxxx>

To: <vip_students@xxxxxxxxxxxxx>
Sent: Tuesday, May 10, 2011 12:02 AM
Subject: [vip_students] Re: Proofreading Symbols and Abbreviations


There is no symbol on mobile phone with that name! It is not Tild either Flor. ----- Original Message ----- From: gary worn
 To: vip_students@xxxxxxxxxxxxx
 Sent: Monday, May 09, 2011 10:56 PM
 Subject: [vip_students] Re: Proofreading Symbols and Abbreviations


 Eleanor.
 Have looked it up on the net and it is called CARET Symbol.

 Gary
----- Original Message ----- From: Eleanor Burke
   To: vip_students@xxxxxxxxxxxxx
   Sent: Monday, May 09, 2011 10:06 PM
   Subject: [vip_students] Re: Proofreading Symbols and Abbreviations


I think you have misunderstood me a little Garry. The symbol is part of a punctuation group which makes up an emotican. There are three punctuation symbols ^-) and all I am asking for is the name of the first symbol so that I can identify it when going through my punctuation symbols on my mobile phone. Without knowing what it is called when I arrow through the list, I cannot choose it, that is all I am asking, its name.

   Eleanor
----- Original Message ----- From: gary worn
     To: vip_students@xxxxxxxxxxxxx
     Sent: Monday, May 09, 2011 9:50 PM
     Subject: [vip_students] Proofreading Symbols and Abbreviations


     Eleanor .

It means insert something, here is the link I found it on. What phone are you using and I check it out for you?.

     Gary

http://webster.commnet.edu/writing/symbols.htm

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