[vicsireland] Re: Linux query

Hay tim,

I've installed an OpenSuSE server and have found that it only took
1.96 gigs of space.
This ran a mail, web, ftp, samba, print and LDAP server for log in
authentication. There was no graphical environment and no normal
desktop tools.

Compare that to a bare minimum Windows server installation!
Ubuntu on it's own is only about six or seven hundred megs. But,
that's a minimal installation straight from the live CD.  When you
start installing applications for it you'll find that your using about
5 or 6 gigs.

Fedora is about the same.  When installed from the DVD with open
office and a few development packages your looking at about six gig
also.

Note, development packages are used when your compiling applications
to be used from source.  This is not something that a lot of users
will do.


To answer your question about Orca and Speakup, the answer is yes.
Orca should be supplied by default with any distribution that provides
Gnome 2.18 or later.  At the moment we're at Gnome 2.23 so every
distribution at this stage should have Orca as most of the
distributions I've used are up to Gnome 2.22 at a minimum.

If you for some crazy reason pick a distribution that doesn't supply
Gnome at all, you can likely install it using it's package management
system or if your absolutely nuts, you could install it from source.


Speakup is a slightly more evil monster.  It's compiled into the
kernel with synthesizers running as modules that are run by passing
them to the kernel at boot or by loading them after as root.

Installing Speakup is possible on any distribution if your willing to
spend the time to figure out how to do it.

About two years ago, I spent three weeks trying to install it on
OpenSuSE 9.3.  It installed but always made the kernel panic at boot
up.

The problem was an experimental module that Novell had enabled
mistakingly that tested for the validity of every module that was
loded.  It's a great idea in theory but Speakup wasn't part of the
distribution so it never let it run.  The kernel is huge.  If
something doesn't work it can take a while to figure out what is
messing things up.

Fortunately, on distributions like OpenSuSE 11 and Ubuntu 8, it's just
a matter of learning how it's done and hope nothing goes wrong during
the process.

Instructions  that I origionally wrote for OpenSuSE 10.3 can
thankfully still be applied to version 11.  You'll find them here.
This should give you an idea what the process is.

http://www.digitaldarragh.com/linux/showpage.asp?section=linux&category=accessibility&title=Installing%20Speakup%20in%20OpenSuSE%2010.3


ne thing I should probably also note is the same choice in Linux
applies to synthesizers in Linux.

Some distributions such as OpenSuSE come with Festival, an absolutely
horrible synthesizer.
Others come with Espeak.  It's not as nice to listen to as Elequents
but it's probably even more responsive and really stable.
Another synthesizer made by IBM and distributed at a fee of around 30
Euro is TTSynth.  This sounds almost exactly like Elequents.  A
previous version of this from around seven years ago is viavoice.  I
still have a copy of that but because it's dependencies are so old
it's not worth spending the time to get it working.

Again, all these synthesizers can be installed on any distribution.
Some distributions however don't include them in their package
managers so a more manual approach needs to be used.  I.e, you need to
install them from source.

To Install ESpeak from source you would use the following instructions:
http://www.digitaldarragh.com/CommentView,guid,366c68c0-7d6a-44d8-a04b-0164aa57b5e3.aspx


Darragh
2008/9/3 Tim Culhane <tim.culhane@xxxxxxxxxxxxxxxx>:
> Hi Darragh,
>
> Just out of curiosity,  how much space would a standard linux distribution
> take up on my hard drive?
>
> For example,  debien along with speakup  or ubuntu  along with orca?
>
> Do Speakup and Orca run on all distributions or just specific ones?
>
> Cheers,
>
> Tim
>
>
> -----Original Message-----
> From: vicsireland-bounce@xxxxxxxxxxxxx
> [mailto:vicsireland-bounce@xxxxxxxxxxxxx] On Behalf Of Darragh Ó Héiligh
> Sent: 03 September 2008 10:17
> To: vicsireland@xxxxxxxxxxxxx
> Subject: [vicsireland] Re: Linux query
>
>
> Robbie,
>
> I'd point you to work that I've done to introduce users to Linux. Much of
> this work has focused on the graphical interface and the Orca Screen reader.
>
> http://www.digitaldarragh.com/linuxat.asp
>
> Almost All Linux distributions will provide you with a very simple interface
> during installation that will allow you to repartition your drive into two
> sections.  1 for Linux and the other with your existing
> Windows installation.   In fact, Distributions like Ubuntu, Fedora,
> OpenSuSE, Mandriva, Slackware, Debien and probably dozens more will provide
> you with an option to automatically repartition your disk to keep your
> windows system intact while also creating room for your new Linux
> distribution.
>
> The other route you could go down is to use a virtual machine. Here, I'm
> using VMWare workstation to host Fedora, Ubuntu and OpenSuSE distributions.
> This is mainly because the three distributions do things so differently,
> it's good to look at things from different perspectives.
>
> Do you know what distribution you need / want to use?
>
> If you don't, there is no perfect or best distribution out there.  The
> advice most people give when asked what distribution they should pick is to
> pick the one who's users can give you the most support.  You can learn more
> about this at http://speakupmodified.org
>
> example, if your going to use the console a lot, then I'd suggest Fedora as
> the Speakup users for that distribution have a very informative mailing
> list. If your going to use the graphical environment i.e, Gnome a lot then
> I'd suggest Ubuntu. the Orca developers write a lot of documentation for
> this.  Most of this distribution can be found at http://live.gnome.org/Orca.
>
> If you don't want much support from the screen reader users out there and
> you want to use something that will get you up and running with a great
> server platform then try OpenSuSE.  Their getting more and more accessible
> with each version they release.
>
> If your  going to be developing then Debien is rock solid and it's usually
> easy enough to get dependencies for build environments via aptitude.
>
> If you really want to tweek your system for the most performance you can get
> then Gentoo is defintly your beast however be prepared to go bald by tairing
> your hair out with frustration.  Linux from scratch: lfs.org is also very
> customizable as the entire distribution must be built by the user from
> source.
>
> in relation to screen readers, the most popular in my experience are Speakup
> for the console, Orca for the graphical environment for Gnome, BrlTTY for
> primarily Braille output for the console.
>
> You also have SBL: SuSE Blinux which is a package developed by Marko
> Skambracks, the IBM screen reader who's name escapes me at the moment YASR,
> the console screen reader that's very easy to install and a few others.
>
> Linux is all about choice.  No matter what you want to do you'll probably
> find about a dozen alternatives that will let you do it in different ways.
> That's what people like most about it.
>
> Let me know if you have any other questions.
>
> Oh, finally, if your using Linux for the first time, I'd suggest you
> download Ubuntu.  the walkthrough for installing that is also on my website.
> www.digitaldarragh.com/linuxat.asp
>
> Darragh ===========================================================
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