(VICT) dog too fast was RE: Re: questions from a friend about her guide dog

Hi all,

Adrian sometimes walks too fast but I think that if I let him of harness and
let the leash slide through my hand he'd just run until he'd correct himself
and choke. Is this not then like a correction?

Thanks for the grate posts!

Ioana and Adrian

-----Original Message-----
From: vi-clicker-trainers-bounce@xxxxxxxxxxxxx
[mailto:vi-clicker-trainers-bounce@xxxxxxxxxxxxx]On Behalf Of DIANNE B.
PHELPS AND PRIMROSE
Sent: December 14, 2008 6:24 PM
To: vi-clicker-trainers@xxxxxxxxxxxxx
Subject: (VICT) Re: questions from a friend about her guide dog


I like that a lot. It is something I never would have thought of, but will
put into my tool box if I ever need something like that again.

Dianne, Hibiscus, and Primrose
----- Original Message -----
From: "Kolby Garrison" <kolbygarrison@xxxxxxxxxxxx>
To: <vi-clicker-trainers@xxxxxxxxxxxxx>
Sent: Sunday, December 14, 2008 1:17 PM
Subject: (VICT) Re: questions from a friend about her guide dog


> Hello All,
> There are times when Sunny goes too fast for my liking, and as soon as I
> feel her speed increase I drop the harness handle while letting the leash
> slide through my hand. Sunny corrects herself and looks back at me
> wondering
> what is going on. I tell her to heel, and she then understands that she
> was
> going to fast. It took a while and many times of using this technique to
> let
> her know that she was going too fast or pulling too hard, but now she
> understands the first time that I drop the handle. During the process you
> do
> not say anything other than the command to heel, and then the forward
> command once the dog is satisfactorily by your side and in position. This
> technique has worked well for us, so I thought that I would throw it out
> there for what it is or is not worth.
> Thank You,
> Kolby
>
> -----Original Message-----
> From: vi-clicker-trainers-bounce@xxxxxxxxxxxxx
> [mailto:vi-clicker-trainers-bounce@xxxxxxxxxxxxx] On Behalf Of DIANNE B.
> PHELPS AND PRIMROSE
> Sent: Sunday, December 14, 2008 4:02 PM
> To: vi-clicker-trainers@xxxxxxxxxxxxx
> Subject: (VICT) Re: questions from a friend about her guide dog
>
> t makes good sense to me. I am really enjoying the new techniques in my
> work
>
> with Hibiscus. Primrose still takes a combination of things, but she is
> doing fine. I definitely like the more positive approach to doing this. I
> really do.
>
> Dianne, Hibiscus, and Primrose
> ----- Original Message -----
> From: <Infinitepaws@xxxxxxx>
> To: <vi-clicker-trainers@xxxxxxxxxxxxx>
> Sent: Saturday, December 13, 2008 10:30 PM
> Subject: (VICT) Re: questions from a friend about her guide dog
>
>
>> In a message dated 12/13/2008 2:21:21 P.M. Central Standard Time,
>> d.bphelps@xxxxxxxxxxx writes:
>> I am  wondering, however, how taking a dog who is used to the old
>> techniques
>> and  trying to  acquire a positive outcome with the new clicker
>> techniques
>> can be effective toward the outcome desired?
>>
>>
>>
>> It does work. You will have to overcome some of the dogs previous
>> training
>> though.. In the past you have consistently trained a dog to  not do
>> something.
>> Everytime you gave a  correction you stopped a behavior you didn't want.
>> The
>> more effectively you did  this, the more behaviors you inhibited. The
>> more
>> times you do this , the less  your dog is willing to offer something new.
>> After
>> all, he doesn't know if it  will earn a correction, so it is safer to not
>> offer
>> it..think about it, if you  were  zapped for every word you didn't
>> pronounce
>> right in a  foreign language, would you continue to offer new words or
>> stick to
>> the few  words you were able to say right? Unless there were other built
>> in
>> rewards, you  wouldnt. Even if you did , it might be pretty hesitant at
>> first... That's where  the dogs that have been correction trained are. If
>> the rules
>> then arbitrarily  changed and you were given rewards for every new word
>> you
>> tried, it could still  be slow at first, because you would still worry
>> about the
>> rule arbitrarily  changing back. And then you would be zapped big time..
>> This
>> change does vary  among dogs and people, due to other personality issues
>> and
>> their general  natures.. a more trusting outgoing dog might be willing to
>> accept that the new  conditions are more permanent than a more reserved,
>> fearful
>> dog. The longer a  dog has played in the correction system, the more they
>> are
>> likely to stay in  that mode, after all, it has worked all this  time for
>> them
>> already, why  change now, they think..Yet, as with people, there are
>> always
>> those who embrace  something new, with such abandon  and exuberance that
>> it just
>> amazes those  around them..
>> does that help explain it?
>> **************Make your life easier with all your friends, email, and
>> favorite sites in one place.  Try it now.
>>
>
(http://www.aol.com/?optin=new-dp&icid=aolcom40vanity&ncid=emlcntaolcom00000
> 010)
>>
>>
>>
>>
>
>
>
>
>




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