(VICT) Re: Intro & Paws

Jen

The Touch cue is where you get the dog to target your hand or fist and touch 
you with its nose.  The Touch exercise is a good one for a, bringing the 
dog's attention back to you if you feel it isn't focusing or it is being 
distracted, and b, you can also use it if you want the dog to find 
particular things like benches or the button to press on a pedestrian 
crossing.  So, let's say you are wanting the dog to find a bench for you and 
you want the dog to touch the bench with it's nose so you can follow the 
head down with your hand and locate the bench.  One way you could teach it 
amongst many others would be:

1. Hold a treat between two fingers, and when the dog nudges your hand or 
fist to get it, click and treat (c/t) You might have to do 12 or more 
repetitions of this for the dog to get the idea.

2. Once the dog knows it gets the treat for touching your hand, you can 
teach the cue, so as he touches, say the word Touch and then c/t.

3. Gradually, start saying Touch before the dog touches you, and when he 
does, c/t.  So now you're using a word to ask for the behaviour you want.

4. Practice touching in different positions.  Crouching, lying down, putting 
your hand in different positions etc, and by this stage, you shouldn't need 
to hold the treat in your hand.  You could have a treat pouch or put them in 
a pocket etc.

5. Once you have Touch on cue and established, you could find a bench, put 
your hand or fist on it, and ask the dog to touch.

6. The next stage would be to take a few steps back and get the dog to touch 
your hand on the bench.

7. Then, as the dog touches, you can use your cue word.  Bench, Seat, Find 
the bench, Find the seat, which ever you want to use.

8.  Finally, you can ask the dog to find the bench and click when you get 
the behaviour you want.  IE, the dog touching your hand on the bench.

9. And lastly, once the dog has this well established, you can start taking 
your hand away and the dog should know by now to touch the bench by itself 
without your hand being there.

Some bright dogs pick this kind of thing up really quick, but with others, 
it does take time.

Have I explained OK people? Hope so.

Donna
----- Original Message ----- 
From: "Jenny Cook" <cjcook6@xxxxxxxxxxxxx>
To: <vi-clicker-trainers@xxxxxxxxxxxxx>
Sent: Tuesday, May 09, 2006 6:35 PM
Subject: (VICT) Re: Intro & Paws


Thanks so much!  Although I've been exposed to it, I haven't tried clicker
training before - would love to get the basic lessons.  What do you mean by
"touch" cue?

Jen

----- Original Message ----- 
From: <Infinitepaws@xxxxxxx>
To: <vi-clicker-trainers@xxxxxxxxxxxxx>
Sent: Tuesday, May 09, 2006 10:28 AM
Subject: (VICT) Re: Intro & Paws


>
> In a message dated 5/9/2006 11:14:55 A.M. Mountain Standard Time,
> cjcook6@xxxxxxxxxxxxx writes:
> Looking  forward to learning, Jen
>
>
>
> Welcome Jen! You will like this list. Have you done anything with clicker
> training? I can send you the basic lessons which will get you started.. A
> good
> "touch" cue can help with that persistent recall issue  too.\!
>
>
>
>


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