(VICT) Re: A curiosity question

I thought I would take a stab at Melinda's question
since no one else seems to be and since most here do
not have service dogs but guide dogs.
First I want to make it clear that I have *never* had
a program trained dog. After waiting 8 years on an
organization who will remain nameless I ventured off
and trained my own dog despite their comments of *you
can't do that!*
Anyway I have been on and continue to remain on
numerous service dog lists including OCAD and
Service-Dogs (Wendy Morrell's list)
From those with program trained dogs in the USA on
these lists and from the tenants who used to live in
my complex here with program trained dogs- one pulled
her chair, the other was medical alert. I can say that
for the most part most of the commands did appear to
be the same from dog to dog from program to program at
the time of graduation. That said some of the people
who added more training did so with the freedom to
choose what terminology they wished for the commands.
Myself, having completely owner trained Met, I had a
ton of freedom at terminology. Some say that is a good
thing while others say its not. I think that debate
could go on for an eternity.
I can tell you that as far as guide skills go, most of
the terminology I use is similar or the same as what I
hear being used on this list and on Julies bviclick
list on yahoogroups.
I can point out though one difference from the get go.
I believe you guys use hup up when the guide is
doddling or you want increased speed (correct me if I
am wrong here). I on the other hand use *lickety* It
started out as lickety-split when Met was young even
before I was contemplating guide training or even knew
I would need it. I lived off of a major road 4 lanes
plus meridian plus bike lanes on each side which were
almost as wide as a car lane. One of the signals had a
habit of changing really fast so we had to
lickety-split to get across. That term has stuck even
to this day nearly 10 years later. 
I use the typical- right, left, forward, back, over,
closer, etc that one would commonly see in the service
and guide worlds. I also use *Paws* some people use
*my lap* or *Paws Up* for me, *My Lap* literally meant
he was to jump all the way up in my lap. It saved his
tooshie when he was about 9 months old when his leash
clasp broke in the middle of school rush traffic! I
have not used that command in a long time- but I had
to use it when he was attacked in 2003 to get him
home- now boy that was precarious trying to safely get
home without his guidance! 
Anyway hopefully this answers a bit of your curiosity.


Karyn and Met

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