[tn-moths] Re: Condica vecors or C. confederata?

I agree it is a C. confederate. I have seen about a dozen C. vecors, and
none were that bright or boldly marked. No the contrary, it took a little
bit of tilting the moth in the right light to even see the markings at all.
Though the markings on your moth don't match those of C. confederate
exactly, I do see where the range of variation would fall over your
specimen, and most of the major field marks and shadings seem to be in
place. Cool moth!!!

Ali  

 

From: tn-moths-bounce@xxxxxxxxxxxxx [mailto:tn-moths-bounce@xxxxxxxxxxxxx]
On Behalf Of J. Merrill Lynch
Sent: Friday, January 14, 2011 2:20 PM
To: ncsc-moths@xxxxxxxxxxxxx; tn-moths
Subject: [tn-moths] Condica vecors or C. confederata?

 

 

Moth'ers,

 

I came across this image going through my pile of unknowns.  It is either an
unusually bright C. vecors or a female or dull form of C. confederata.  I've
seen plenty of C. vecors but never an individual this brightly patterned
with yellowish-tan along the inner margin of the forewing.  C. confederata
is sexually dimorphic and the males are pretty striking.  Apparently females
are much duller and my individual seems to match pretty well with images of
female C. confederata on MPG/Bugguide.  I have no experience with C.
confederata and was wondering if any of you may have come across this
species and can share your opinion.  I've sent this image to Parker
Backstrom and he thinks it's a dull C. confederata and I tend to agree.
This individual was photographed at my Halifax County farm on Sept. 25,
2010.

 

Merrill

-- 
J. Merrill Lynch
Echo Valley Farm
Watauga County, NC
Elevation:  3,400 feet




-- 
J. Merrill Lynch
Echo Valley Farm
Watauga County, NC
Elevation:  3,400 feet

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