[tabi] Re: Online Courses

  • From: "Charles Atkins" <catkins@xxxxxxx>
  • To: <tabi@xxxxxxxxxxxxx>
  • Date: Sat, 25 Jun 2011 19:29:19 -0400

I love the computer and what it stands for, great tool!  The best.  Had it come 
as an organ in our bodies, we'd all get it!  Teachers can tell some students a 
million times through an entire life time, and yet, many many many still won't 
get it by default gentlemen and others!  They are not stupid!  It is just not 
what they are cut out for!

Technology is just you guys forte and thank God there are some of you around, 
usually to tell the others what to do!  Technology is here, I'm sure to stay, 
as it should, but, I pray, someday, the computer evolves and become automatic 
(every single function).


Thanks for listening!


  ----- Original Message ----- 
  From: Allison and Chip Orange 
  To: tabi@xxxxxxxxxxxxx 
  Sent: Saturday, June 25, 2011 7:03 PM
  Subject: [tabi] Re: Online Courses


  this is a very very good point Governor!

  I've seen some assistive technology instructors simply giving the student 
keystrokes to memorize, with no explanation as to which ones were a screen 
reader command, and which (such as windows-M or even tabbing between controls 
of a dialog) were windows commands, and so would work for sighted people or 
with another screen reader.

  Place such students in a slightly different environment (say with another 
screen reader), and they have no idea what they can and can't use.

  Chip




------------------------------------------------------------------------------
  From: tabi-bounce@xxxxxxxxxxxxx [mailto:tabi-bounce@xxxxxxxxxxxxx] On Behalf 
Of Governor Staten
  Sent: Saturday, June 25, 2011 2:47 PM
  To: tabi@xxxxxxxxxxxxx
  Subject: [tabi] Re: Online Courses


  There is a deeper problem here too. When you teach a person how to use a 
screen reader and not the operating system, Windows for example, you're headed 
for trouble. They rely on that screen reader to do everything for them. Learn 
Windows first, and then, learn screen reader commands on top of that. What 
makes something accessible? It could be that you might not know what you need 
to know to use the site, or it could truly be inaccessible. Which scenario are 
we talking about here?

  On 6/25/2011 12:44 PM, Charles Atkins wrote: 
    I know Hadley is cool; I had classes with them before!

    I'm more worried that, more than should have to, students that are visually 
impaired are not, independently, sailing and are needing outside assistance far 
too often and instructors are being permitted to feel comfortable with having 
them do it.




      ----- Original Message ----- 
      From: Lynn Evans 
      To: tabi@xxxxxxxxxxxxx 
      Sent: Saturday, June 25, 2011 12:33 PM
      Subject: [tabi] Re: Online Courses


      It is hard to say Charles 
      The classes over the internet would be 100% accessible.  
      The Excel class They mailed me the workbook and I used my CCTV and 
emailed them my test. I thought it was quite accessible. 
      The coarse on the Old Testament was on audio tape and I emailed them the 
test. 

      Hadley is the school for the blind so it has to be accessible. 

        ----- Original Message ----- 
        From: Charles Atkins 
        To: tabi@xxxxxxxxxxxxx 
        Sent: Saturday, June 25, 2011 8:38 AM
        Subject: [tabi] Re: Online Courses


        But how would you score Lynn?

        And:

        Thanks!


          ----- Original Message ----- 
          From: Lynn Evans 
          To: tabi@xxxxxxxxxxxxx 
          Sent: Friday, June 24, 2011 8:24 PM
          Subject: [tabi] Re: Online Courses


          Let's not forget

          The Hadley school has computer classes and they are free. 

          I beta tested an Excel coarse a few years ago and learned a lot. 

          coarse listings at:
          http://www.hadley.edu/2_g_CourseCatalog.asp

            ----- Original Message ----- 
            From: Charles Atkins 
            To: tabi@xxxxxxxxxxxxx 
            Sent: Friday, June 24, 2011 4:21 PM
            Subject: [tabi] Re: Online Courses


            To add:

            Some people can't really get the "technical" theory together but, 
need the computer just as much as the rest of the world does.  For them, a 
series of nice recordings of skilled users of Jaws and other speech and audible 
program, succeeding and sort of describing as they are going along so, would, I 
believe, be an enormous help.

            A very thoughtful world would realize that by default, many, won't 
be able to be adept at using computers, just as, many, will!

            Everybody can breathe and eat and such, but, everybody can't 
perform all skills with an equal degree of proficiency.

            I've known many people with all of their vision, and other 
faculties, but, couldn't even, drive a car, nor, swim and more!




              ----- Original Message ----- 
              From: Tinetta Cooper 
              To: tabi@xxxxxxxxxxxxx 
              Sent: Friday, June 24, 2011 12:25 PM
              Subject: [tabi] Re: Online Courses


              I would score accessibility as an 8.  Are you doing a survey?

                ----- Original Message ----- 
                From: Charles Atkins 
                To: tabi@xxxxxxxxxxxxx 
                Sent: Friday, June 24, 2011 10:47 AM
                Subject: [tabi] Re: Online Courses


                Are you prepared to say, then:  From 1 to 10, fairly accessible 
scores a

                What?

                Thanks!


                  ----- Original Message ----- 
                  From: Tinetta Cooper 
                  To: tabi@xxxxxxxxxxxxx 
                  Sent: Friday, June 24, 2011 10:11 AM
                  Subject: [tabi] Re: Online Courses


                  Charles, 
                  I have taken online courses at TCC, and will be taking 
another in the fall.
                  Once you learn to navigate the Blackboard web page, it is 
fairly accessible.  Blackboard is the main page for most colleges and 
universities.  Course work may involve other applications, such as Excel, Word, 
Access, and PowerPoint.  While these programs are not as accessible, 
instructors are very helpful in making materials easier to use.  I even had 
communication with a blind professor at FSU who consulted with one of my 
professors.  This was regarding an online course in macroeconomics.
                  I hope this information is helpful.

                  Tinetta
                    ----- Original Message ----- 
                    From: Charles Atkins 
                    To: tabi@xxxxxxxxxxxxx 
                    Sent: Thursday, June 23, 2011 11:13 PM
                    Subject: [tabi] Online Courses


                    Anyone taking online courses in our group?

                    Are you getting the job done independently?

                    Has any leaders of the blind made a list of schools and 
universities which are accessible and, not accessible?

                    Is it a website?

                    Thanks!

                    Charles Atkins


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