[rollei_list] Re: Rolleiflex SL 35M and Rolleinar 3,5/200mm


----- Original Message ----- From: "Marc James Small" <marcsmall@xxxxxxxxxxx>
To: <rollei_list@xxxxxxxxxxxxx>
Sent: Saturday, September 08, 2007 2:06 PM
Subject: [rollei_list] Re: Rolleiflex SL 35M and Rolleinar 3,5/200mm


At 04:48 PM 9/8/2007, Jim Brick wrote:
>Being a long time match shooter, I find that I can hand hold heavy >cameras and lenses far more steady than light equipment. Let out half
>a breath, then release the shutter in between heart beats.

Hmm.  I am on Jim's side on this one:  a decently
heavy rifle is easier for me to shoot accurately
than is a light one.  Part of this may well be
technique:  I was trained to shoot with match
rifles.  I can shoot accurately with lighter
rifles but it is more work and takes more concentration.

I generally shoot with a Rolleiflex TLR by
bracing the strap against my neck and pulling
down on it.  But for straight hand-held cameras,
I find heavier cameras easier to shoot accurately than I do lighter ones.

Tripods?  I don't need no steenkin' tripod,
though I use them on occasion with VERY long
lenses.  But a rig such as a 4/300 Makro-Zoomatar
on a Rolleiflex SL35E is a happy handheld mix.

Marc

I rather think the answer is the inirtia of the heavier camera or gun. It would act as a mechanical filter to reduce the effects of muscle tremor, etc. For both the design of the stock or body has an effect: the larger the area for bracing the less likely that small movements can occur. For a camera I find the method of tripping the shutter also has an effect, for instance, the Rolleicord up to the IV the lever is worked by the index finger of the hand that holds the camera so the force is against the base of the thumb and the camera does not move. At least one camera, the Stereo Realist, was designed to be used "upside down" so that the flat back of the camera rests on the forhead. This gives the camera a very large area for bracing and its quite steady. Some other cameras can be used in a similar way although reaching the shutter tripping button may be clumsy. As shooters know the design of the stock of either a rifle or handgun is very important and has an effect on accuracy of shooting.

---
Richard Knoppow
Los Angeles, CA, USA
dickburk@xxxxxxxxxxxxx
---
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