[pure-silver] Re: Multigrade 1:9 developer vs Dektol 1:2

Eric, It has been many years since I used it too. When Ilford was sponsoring
our workshops, I used it and was happy with the results. It do recall it not
lasting like my old friend Ansco 130 though, so my personal work was done
with 130. I did use the Ilford in my ICP processor though. 

Eric Neilsen
Eric Neilsen Photography
4101 Commerce Street, Suite 9
Dallas, TX 75226
 
www.ericneilsenphotography.com
skype me with ejprinter
Let's Talk Photography
 
-----Original Message-----
From: pure-silver-bounce@xxxxxxxxxxxxx
[mailto:pure-silver-bounce@xxxxxxxxxxxxx] On Behalf Of Richard Knoppow
Sent: Wednesday, February 22, 2012 8:17 PM
To: pure-silver@xxxxxxxxxxxxx
Subject: [pure-silver] Re: Multigrade 1:9 developer vs Dektol 1:2


----- Original Message ----- 
From: "Eric Nelson" <emanmb@xxxxxxxxx>
To: <pure-silver@xxxxxxxxxxxxx>
Sent: Wednesday, February 22, 2012 5:37 PM
Subject: [pure-silver] Re: Multigrade 1:9 developer vs 
Dektol 1:2


I did a little more research and found that at the next 
dilution listed, which is 1:14, the development needs to be 
increased as expected, as well as the capacity is 
diminished. Perhaps a false economy indeed, but along those 
same lines, I do get good blacks in Ansco 115 diluted 1:5 
but developed for 2-2.5 mins. Certainly as black as needed 
anyway! :) So perhaps for RC prints, which is a relatively 
quick development, 1:14 would be fine but there won't be 
much more of that done here anyway.
Thanks Richard.
e

    I am pretty sure the RC papers that develop quickly have 
developer-incorporated emulsions. This was originally to 
allow the paper to be used in an activator type rapid-access 
machine. I am not sure anyone uses these any more but I 
think some RC emulsions still have developer in them. The 
developer-incorporated papers develop in about half the time 
of a conventional emulsion weather coated on RC or fiber 
paper. Most conventional papers take somewhere between one 
and two minutes for complete development. The cold tone 
papers like the late-lamented Kodabromide, would develop in 
one minute, warm tone papers took about two minutes. These 
are minimum times and extending them by about fifty percent 
was common. Development time can compensate for exposure 
over a rather narrow range. Despite the extensive literature 
on control of contrast by development the contrast of paper 
is pretty much built into the emulsion so that variation of 
exposure and development has very little effect on it unless 
one is willing to accept under-developed blacks. This is a 
different situation from pictorial film where the emulsion 
is seldom developed to "completion", as a result one can 
vary the contrast of the image over a rather wide range by 
adjusting exposure and development.
     I rather think you already know this stuff but some 
readers of this list may not.


--
Richard Knoppow
Los Angeles
WB6KBL
dickburk@xxxxxxxxxxxxx 

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