RE: using breadboards

Yes sorry the flat pack name has always stuck with me because the surface
mount processors look like the original flat packs with more legs.  So sorry
that was my bad for using the wrong acronym.

Ken 

-----Original Message-----
From: programmingblind-bounce@xxxxxxxxxxxxx
[mailto:programmingblind-bounce@xxxxxxxxxxxxx] On Behalf Of Lloyd Rasmussen
Sent: Thursday, February 26, 2009 10:37 PM
To: programmingblind@xxxxxxxxxxxxx
Subject: RE: using breadboards

There were certain kinds of IC's in the past called flat packs.  But you are
probably referring to surface mount components.  I am amazed by how
miniaturized things have become over the past 50 years.  The main circuit
board for the NLS player and the Victor Stream has about 20 IC's on it,
including voltage regulators, the ARM9E processor, a digital-to-analog
converter, flash memory, dynamic RAM, headphone amplifier and speaker
amplifiers.  Both of these players run Linux.  You could learn some
electronics if you began reading various articles from QST magazine over the
next couple of years in your "copious free time".  There are meters for
measuring resistance, capacitance, etc.  As you obtain components, you could
develop a filing system so you know, for example, where your 2.2 K ohm
resistors are.  That's the advantage of building your own circuits.  The
disadvantage is that they won't be as small as the state of the art now
permits.  

Lloyd Rasmussen, W3IUU, Kensington, Maryland
Home:  http://lras.home.sprynet.com
Work:  http://www.loc.gov/nls
 

> -----Original Message-----
> From: programmingblind-bounce@xxxxxxxxxxxxx [mailto:programmingblind-
> bounce@xxxxxxxxxxxxx] On Behalf Of Bryan Schulz
> Sent: Sunday, February 22, 2009 6:22 PM
> To: programmingblind@xxxxxxxxxxxxx
> Subject: Re: using breadboards
> 
> what are flat pack parts?
> 
> Bryan Schulz
> The BEST Solution
> www.best-acts.com
> 
> 
>       ----- Original Message -----
>       From: Ken Perry <mailto:whistler@xxxxxxxxxxxxx>
>       To: programmingblind@xxxxxxxxxxxxx
>       Sent: Sunday, February 22, 2009 4:36 PM
>       Subject: RE: using breadboards
> 
> 
> 
> 
>       Well soldering blind can be done with the larger components but just
> get your first flat pack set and try to line up all those little legs and
> if you're not using flat pack components now days you're in the dark ages.
> 
> 
> 
>       Ken
> 
> 
> 
>       From: programmingblind-bounce@xxxxxxxxxxxxx
> [mailto:programmingblind-bounce@xxxxxxxxxxxxx] On Behalf Of Bob Kennedy
>       Sent: Sunday, February 22, 2009 4:19 PM
>       To: programmingblind@xxxxxxxxxxxxx
>       Subject: Re: using breadboards
> 
> 
> 
>       Good points Ken.  And the problem with soldering blind?  I know it
> can be done, I do it quite often.  But not in such tight places or where
> heat can destroy something.  But I'll never be the one to say it can't be
> done.
> 
> 
> 
>       If you figure out color coding make sure to share it?  Unless it's
> having someone tell you the colors...
> 
>               ----- Original Message -----
> 
>               From: Ken Perry <mailto:whistler@xxxxxxxxxxxxx>
> 
>               To: programmingblind@xxxxxxxxxxxxxx
> <mailto:programmingblind@xxxxxxxxxxxxx>
> 
>               Sent: Sunday, February 22, 2009 4:07 PM
> 
>               Subject: RE: using breadboards
> 
> 
> 
> 
> 
>               Ok Tylor this is what I did in the military before I lost my
> site.  I am going to only say this once and people can jump on me all they
> want.  You are wasting your time.   When it comes to coding I was willing
> to help if your thinking of building your own circuit boards blind you are
> just plain wasting your time.  I am not saying doing it is impossible I am
> saying doing it is a waste of time.  Let me say it one more time. Waste of
> time.  If you want to design some small device that is fine use the single
> board development kits that are out there that come with everything you
> need on a single board and just code for it.  Then once you have a product
> developed on that board you pay a large company that does this to pair
> your device down to what you need.
> 
> 
> 
>               You said you understand polarity that is great do you
> understand pnp transistors, logic chips, can you look at them and tell
> which side the positive goes on?  Can you look at a resister and tell the
> color coding without help?  Can you read the chips codes and tell what
> they are can you see which direction has the power pins on it?  You will
> blow up more components than it's worth and when you get right down to it
> you will be able to do only the most simple circuits blind with a bread
> board.  So you will be able to design almost nothing for a cost of a lot
> of hours.  Sure you will learn something but the question is is it a good
> expenditure of your time?
> 
> 
> 
>               You could spend $274 on a single board development kit and
> have something working tomorrow.  Something that has already went through
> the testing for power supplies and electric signal interference.  Whereas
> what you would build on a bread board might just make good smoke the first
> 90 times.
> 
> 
> 
>               Ken
> 
>               Ken
> ...

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