RE: question for the music gurus:slightly programming related

I tend to think your number is more correct than the 278 that I provided,
but I see sites saying both.

*shrug*, I am so beyond in agreement with you: if in dire  need, just look
them up, *grin*.

Take care,
Sina


-----Original Message-----
From: programmingblind-bounce@xxxxxxxxxxxxx
[mailto:programmingblind-bounce@xxxxxxxxxxxxx] On Behalf Of James Panes
Sent: Thursday, March 12, 2009 6:31 PM
To: programmingblind@xxxxxxxxxxxxx
Subject: Re: question for the music gurus:slightly programming related

Ah, yes. Sadly I was mistaken.

Concert A is the A above middle C. Using this as a base and exactly equal 
exponential steps, my calculator says middle C is 
261.6255653005986346778499935233 Hz.

According to Wickapedia, middle C is 261.626 Hz

Another contributing factor to my mistaken belief is that I thought C was 
the base of the musical scale and its frequency was always even powers of 2.

That's what you get for living in a digital world.

I won't argue the facts anymore. Just look them up.

Regards,
James

jimpanes@xxxxxxxxx
jimpanes@xxxxxxxxxxxx
"Everything is easy when you know how."

----- Original Message ----- 
From: "Sina Bahram" <sbahram@xxxxxxxxx>
To: <programmingblind@xxxxxxxxxxxxx>
Sent: Wednesday, March 11, 2009 6:32 PM
Subject: RE: question for the music gurus:slightly programming related


I don't believe this is correct. Middle c is 278.4375   Hz, from what I
remember, and a quick google yielded several dozen sites saying the same
thing.

Take care,
Sina

-----Original Message-----
From: programmingblind-bounce@xxxxxxxxxxxxx
[mailto:programmingblind-bounce@xxxxxxxxxxxxx] On Behalf Of James Panes
Sent: Wednesday, March 11, 2009 5:41 PM
To: programmingblind@xxxxxxxxxxxxx
Subject: Re: question for the music gurus:slightly programming related

No, 440 hz is the A below middle C. Coincidentally, middle C is 512 Hz.
Regards,
Jim
jimpanes@xxxxxxxxx
jimpanes@xxxxxxxxxxxx
"Everything is easy when you know how."

----- Original Message ----- 
From: "Sina Bahram" <sbahram@xxxxxxxxx>
To: <programmingblind@xxxxxxxxxxxxx>
Sent: Tuesday, March 10, 2009 10:45 PM
Subject: RE: question for the music gurus:slightly programming related


You could simply generate a sine wave at 440hz, which gives you concert A.
now that you have the A above middle C, simply increment and decrement your
frequency appropriately to achieve the desired note.

Take care,
Sina

-----Original Message-----
From: programmingblind-bounce@xxxxxxxxxxxxx
[mailto:programmingblind-bounce@xxxxxxxxxxxxx] On Behalf Of Alex Hall
Sent: Tuesday, March 10, 2009 10:19 PM
To: programmingblind@xxxxxxxxxxxxx
Subject: re: question for the music gurus:slightly programming related

A rest depends on the beat; it will be one full beat, so a slow
beat will have a longer rest than a fast beat.  I usually just
pick seconds; so maybe I want 5 notes per second, which means my
beat is .8 seconds long, so my rest is .8 seconds.  A measure
will be 3.2 seconds (4 beats).  Each note, then, would be 200
miliseconds, so a quarter note is 50 ms.  I hope this makes
sense.

Unfortunately, my note frequencies list has disappeared, but just
Google "musical note frequencies" or something like it.  HTH!

Have a great day,
Alex

>----- Original Message -----
>From: "Tyler Littlefield" <tyler@xxxxxxxxxxxxx
>To: <programmingblind@xxxxxxxxxxxxx
>Date sent: Tue, 10 Mar 2009 20:05:27 -0600
>Subject: question for the music gurus:slightly programming
related

>I got really bored earlier, and decided to mess with some musical
notes.
>I found a listing of wikipedia's notes, but the f frequency seems
to be off.
>Would anyone happen to have a list, somewhere of: 1: the
frequency of a full octive--I can just multiply by 2 or divide by
2 to get higher/lower, and the duration for a full rest--I can
just divide again to get quarter/eighth etc.

>Thanks,
>Tyler Littlefield
>Web: tysdomain.com
>email: tyler@xxxxxxxxxxxxx
>My programs don't have bugs, they're called randomly added
features.

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