RE: question for the music gurus:slightly programming related

Calculate them on the fly; otherwise, you'll deal with input error, floating
point error, and so on.

Take care,
Sina


-----Original Message-----
From: programmingblind-bounce@xxxxxxxxxxxxx
[mailto:programmingblind-bounce@xxxxxxxxxxxxx] On Behalf Of Tyler
Littlefield
Sent: Wednesday, March 11, 2009 12:17 AM
To: programmingblind@xxxxxxxxxxxxx
Subject: Re: question for the music gurus:slightly programming related

I got that. I ended up reading that after I tried to do the divisible by 7, 
and that makes more sense. thanks for the link. I'll manually calculate 
those because I'm not really sure how to throw in calculations for each note

now that I'm calculating for both black and white.


Thanks,
Tyler Littlefield
Web: tysdomain.com
email: tyler@xxxxxxxxxxxxx
My programs don't have bugs, they're called randomly added features.

----- Original Message ----- 
From: "Sina Bahram" <sbahram@xxxxxxxxx>
To: <programmingblind@xxxxxxxxxxxxx>
Sent: Tuesday, March 10, 2009 10:01 PM
Subject: RE: question for the music gurus:slightly programming related


> Ok, then you understand the part about the 12th root of 2, yes? Because
> that's how to do it, not dividing by 7. please remember there are 12 keys 
> in
> each octive, 7 white and 5 black. Also, it's not an even ddistribution, 
> it's
> only an equidistant stepping; therefore, each note is determined not by 
> the
> n-1 note but by the n-12 note, as that is one octive before it. Because 
> it's
> impracticle to do things this way, the article/page gives you a formula by
> which you can calculate the x+c note, where c can be positive or negative,
> measured in steps E.G. 12 per octive, and x is defined as the current
> note/frequency E.G. 440hz for A.
>
> Take care,
> Sina
>
> -----Original Message-----
> From: programmingblind-bounce@xxxxxxxxxxxxx
> [mailto:programmingblind-bounce@xxxxxxxxxxxxx] On Behalf Of Tyler
> Littlefield
> Sent: Tuesday, March 10, 2009 11:47 PM
> To: programmingblind@xxxxxxxxxxxxx
> Subject: Re: question for the music gurus:slightly programming related
>
> I did. thanks for asking.
>
> Thanks,
> Tyler Littlefield
> Web: tysdomain.com
> email: tyler@xxxxxxxxxxxxx
> My programs don't have bugs, they're called randomly added features.
>
> ----- Original Message ----- 
> From: "Sina Bahram" <sbahram@xxxxxxxxx>
> To: <programmingblind@xxxxxxxxxxxxx>
> Sent: Tuesday, March 10, 2009 9:29 PM
> Subject: RE: question for the music gurus:slightly programming related
>
>
>> Did you read the site? At all?
>>
>> Take care,
>> Sina
>>
>> -----Original Message-----
>> From: programmingblind-bounce@xxxxxxxxxxxxx
>> [mailto:programmingblind-bounce@xxxxxxxxxxxxx] On Behalf Of Tyler
>> Littlefield
>> Sent: Tuesday, March 10, 2009 11:08 PM
>> To: programmingblind@xxxxxxxxxxxxx
>> Subject: Re: question for the music gurus:slightly programming related
>>
>> o, I gotcha. I wasn't thinking about that... thanks. :) so going from 
>> 240,
>> my next c would be 480. so I basically divide 240/7 and use that as my
>> scale, and add note+(240*oct) to the mix to get the real note.
>>
>>
>> Thanks,
>> Tyler Littlefield
>> Web: tysdomain.com
>> email: tyler@xxxxxxxxxxxxx
>> My programs don't have bugs, they're called randomly added features.
>>
>> ----- Original Message ----- 
>> From: "Sina Bahram" <sbahram@xxxxxxxxx>
>> To: <programmingblind@xxxxxxxxxxxxx>
>> Sent: Tuesday, March 10, 2009 9:03 PM
>> Subject: RE: question for the music gurus:slightly programming related
>>
>>
>>> You can figure it out based on the fact you know a previous or 
>>> successive
>>> octive is twice down or up, and that the notes are in equal tempered
>>> chromatic scales. Here's a site; however.
>>>
>>> http://www.physlink.com/Education/askExperts/ae165.cfm
>>>
>>> Take care,
>>> Sina
>>>
>>> -----Original Message-----
>>> From: programmingblind-bounce@xxxxxxxxxxxxx
>>> [mailto:programmingblind-bounce@xxxxxxxxxxxxx] On Behalf Of Tyler
>>> Littlefield
>>> Sent: Tuesday, March 10, 2009 10:57 PM
>>> To: programmingblind@xxxxxxxxxxxxx
>>> Subject: Re: question for the music gurus:slightly programming related
>>>
>>> uh... how much is "appropriately?" Is there a range from a to b, b to c,
>>> etc?
>>>
>>>
>>> Thanks,
>>> Tyler Littlefield
>>> Web: tysdomain.com
>>> email: tyler@xxxxxxxxxxxxx
>>> My programs don't have bugs, they're called randomly added features.
>>>
>>> ----- Original Message ----- 
>>> From: "Sina Bahram" <sbahram@xxxxxxxxx>
>>> To: <programmingblind@xxxxxxxxxxxxx>
>>> Sent: Tuesday, March 10, 2009 8:45 PM
>>> Subject: RE: question for the music gurus:slightly programming related
>>>
>>>
>>>> You could simply generate a sine wave at 440hz, which gives you concert
>>>> A.
>>>> now that you have the A above middle C, simply increment and decrement
>>>> your
>>>> frequency appropriately to achieve the desired note.
>>>>
>>>> Take care,
>>>> Sina
>>>>
>>>> -----Original Message-----
>>>> From: programmingblind-bounce@xxxxxxxxxxxxx
>>>> [mailto:programmingblind-bounce@xxxxxxxxxxxxx] On Behalf Of Alex Hall
>>>> Sent: Tuesday, March 10, 2009 10:19 PM
>>>> To: programmingblind@xxxxxxxxxxxxx
>>>> Subject: re: question for the music gurus:slightly programming related
>>>>
>>>> A rest depends on the beat; it will be one full beat, so a slow
>>>> beat will have a longer rest than a fast beat.  I usually just
>>>> pick seconds; so maybe I want 5 notes per second, which means my
>>>> beat is .8 seconds long, so my rest is .8 seconds.  A measure
>>>> will be 3.2 seconds (4 beats).  Each note, then, would be 200
>>>> miliseconds, so a quarter note is 50 ms.  I hope this makes
>>>> sense.
>>>>
>>>> Unfortunately, my note frequencies list has disappeared, but just
>>>> Google "musical note frequencies" or something like it.  HTH!
>>>>
>>>> Have a great day,
>>>> Alex
>>>>
>>>>>----- Original Message -----
>>>>>From: "Tyler Littlefield" <tyler@xxxxxxxxxxxxx
>>>>>To: <programmingblind@xxxxxxxxxxxxx
>>>>>Date sent: Tue, 10 Mar 2009 20:05:27 -0600
>>>>>Subject: question for the music gurus:slightly programming
>>>> related
>>>>
>>>>>I got really bored earlier, and decided to mess with some musical
>>>> notes.
>>>>>I found a listing of wikipedia's notes, but the f frequency seems
>>>> to be off.
>>>>>Would anyone happen to have a list, somewhere of: 1: the
>>>> frequency of a full octive--I can just multiply by 2 or divide by
>>>> 2 to get higher/lower, and the duration for a full rest--I can
>>>> just divide again to get quarter/eighth etc.
>>>>
>>>>>Thanks,
>>>>>Tyler Littlefield
>>>>>Web: tysdomain.com
>>>>>email: tyler@xxxxxxxxxxxxx
>>>>>My programs don't have bugs, they're called randomly added
>>>> features.
>>>>
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