RE: programming on Windows (was RE: Any support/suggestions for a blind student)

Don,

I just got Vinux3.0 installed and operational and used aptitude to do
updates and upgrades and if what happened to me is any indication,
apparently aptitude honors apt-get's pins because the system after a
reboot once upgrades were done is still talking.

-----Original Message-----
From: programmingblind-bounce@xxxxxxxxxxxxx
[mailto:programmingblind-bounce@xxxxxxxxxxxxx] On Behalf Of Don Marang
Sent: Friday, September 10, 2010 12:55
To: programmingblind@xxxxxxxxxxxxx
Subject: Re: programming on Windows (was RE: Any support/suggestions for
a blind student)

I do not think you looked around enough on the vinux.org.uk site or any
of 
it's mirrors.  The Libra live CD is just for those individuals and 
institutions that have to worry about such licences.  Even if you choose
the 
Libra edition, nothing stops you from checking multiverse and such in
the 
Software Sources dialog and downloading any Ubuntu Lucid package.

If you look further down the download page, pastthe the first, download 
link, you will find a few other editions.  There is the standard CD
sized 
edition, which has EasyInstall icons on the desktop and in the menus for

installing groups of applications, like Graphics, Office, Multi-media,
and 
OCR.  There is a special EasyInstall icon to for such Codecs.   I think
all 
of the EasyInstall scripts are even available in the Libra edition,
possibly 
with the exception of the Codecs script.

There is also a full featured DVD sized edition with all of those groups

installed plus some.  On the virtual site, there is also a
pre-configured 
Virtual edition and an USB live edition with persistent storage.

Actually, the graphical update system should be avoided at this time.
There 
aare a couple of packages that are pinned so they are prevented from 
updating over a special stable version when using apt-get.  Currently,
the 
graphical aptitude program does not honor these pinned packages and will

screw up the speech!  Therefore, stick to installing and updating with
'sudo 
apt-get install package-name' until this gets figured out.

Don Marang

There is just so much stuff in the world that, to me, is devoid of any
real 
substance, value, and content that I just try to make sure that I am
working 
on things that matter.
Dean Kamen


--------------------------------------------------
From: "Alex Midence" <alex.midence@xxxxxxxxx>
Sent: Friday, September 10, 2010 9:40 AM
To: <programmingblind@xxxxxxxxxxxxx>
Subject: Re: programming on Windows (was RE: Any support/suggestions for
a 
blind student)

> Well, I tried to get it but never managed to get my pc to boot up with
> it.  Tried using it on an old pc.  Heard you can install linux using a
> serial cable and another pc as a terminal.  May try that some day.
> Also, disturbingly, it seems someone has gone and made Vinux
> completely strictly libra open source as in, won't download or install
> anything not libra or open source.  Even edited the script file to
> make it that much harder for you.  People have had a hard time doing
> such mundane things as playing mp3 files with it because the media
> player included only plays ogg files since they are open source and
> mp3 is closed source.  This is making me want to stay away from vinux.
> I want to be FREE yes, FREE, I said, to pick and choose whatever app
> I want to install on my own machine.  If I want to, I'll install a
> closed source, and if I want to, I'll install an open source.  I don't
> want some system preventing me from exercising that freedom.  Perhaps
> this is hearsay but if it's not, whoever implemented this policy is
> just as bad as any closed source vendor they despise since they are
> also restricting the end user's freedom in some way.
>
> Sorry, didn't mean to rant that much.  I had to grab a dvd burning
> software to open the iso file only to find out that it's probably not
> all its cracked up to be.  This burning software appears to have
> ruined my cd/dvd burner at home.  Stay away from img burn, btw.
>
> Alex M
>
> On 8/30/10, black ares <matematicianu2003@xxxxxxxxxxx> wrote:
>> you can search for orca accessible applications.
>> There you will find the list.
>> Vinux is very beauty full, but still have the general linux problems,
>> problems that make me to stay away from it.
>> But, Vinux team has made a lot of efort to create a distro that is
very
>> suited for blind people.
>> Also it is a repaired one, more problems that I've encountered in the

>> grand
>> distros (fedora, ubuntu) disappeared from Vinux.
>> Mainly, the only problem I have with vinux is that, when I plug my
phones 
>> on
>> to my laptop, the speakers don't get muted and I found no
configuration 
>> to
>> do jack sense.
>>
>> ----- Original Message -----
>> From: "Alex Midence" <alex.midence@xxxxxxxxx>
>> To: <programmingblind@xxxxxxxxxxxxx>
>> Sent: Tuesday, August 31, 2010 12:35 AM
>> Subject: Re: programming on Windows (was RE: Any support/suggestions
for 
>> a
>> blind student)
>>
>>
>>> I'd heard of Vinux but hadn't ever looked into it.  I'm enormously
>>> intrigued.  I may create a live cd and try it out on an old pc I've
>>> got in my tool closet just collecting dust.  Does there exist a
>>> comprehensive list or, even a small one, of all the accessible apps
>>> for Linux?  Any of them taht are just absolutely, in no way
>>> accessible?  Any link would be appreciated.  Also, you are welcome
to
>>> e-mail me privately so we don't spam the list with off topic stuff.
>>> Thank for the link.
>>>
>>> Alex M
>>>
>>> On 8/30/10, Don Marang <donald.marang@xxxxxxxxx> wrote:
>>>> If the only reason to install XP is to run SigWin, why not just
install
>>>> the
>>>> real thing?  Try Vinux, a blind friendly distribution of Ubuntu.
It
>>>> provides and configures several screen readers, like SpeakUp for
it's
>>>> consoles and Orca for the gnome GUI desktop.  It also has two 
>>>> magnifiers.
>>>> The Vinux community is solving many of the Linux accessibility and 
>>>> voice
>>>> stability issues.  It has a fully accessible installer that can
either
>>>> use
>>>> the entire internal drive or install side by side with Windows for
a 
>>>> dual
>>>> boot configuration.  It can also run from a live disk, a USB pen
drive,
>>>> or a
>>>> Virtual Machine.
>>>>
>>>> Check out
>>>> http://vinux.org.uk
>>>>
>>>> I just added a bash script, speedy-ocr, to the Vinux repository
which
>>>> uses
>>>> the free tesseract or cuneiform OCR software to provide simplified
>>>> scanning
>>>> and performing OCR on any image file or files.
>>>>
>>>> Don Marang
>>>>
>>>> There is just so much stuff in the world that, to me, is devoid of
any
>>>> real
>>>> substance, value, and content that I just try to make sure that I
am
>>>> working
>>>> on things that matter.
>>>> Dean Kamen
>>>>
>>>>
>>>> --------------------------------------------------
>>>> From: "DaShiell, Jude T.  CIV NAVAIR 1490, 1, 26"
>>>> <jude.dashiell@xxxxxxxx>
>>>> Sent: Monday, August 30, 2010 7:50 AM
>>>> To: <programmingblind@xxxxxxxxxxxxx>
>>>> Subject: RE: programming on Windows (was RE: Any
support/suggestions 
>>>> for
>>>> a
>>>> blind student)
>>>>
>>>>> Thank you very much for these resources, they may be useful at
home if 
>>>>> I
>>>>> can end up installing Windows XP myself using screen narrator.
None 
>>>>> of
>>>>> these resources will be useful at work since we work in a locked
down
>>>>> software environment.  Anything not already approved for use costs
>>>>> dollars and takes a year to get approved if everyone does
everything
>>>>> right all along the line for the software approval.  That doesn't 
>>>>> always
>>>>> happen either.  Screen readers for Linux do exist and the Mac has
>>>>> VoiceOver but Linux has http://www.linuxspeakup.org/ and
>>>>> http://speakupmodified.org/ among others to examine.  Screen
readers 
>>>>> are
>>>>> like Center Fielders with catching gloves on both hands.  If right

>>>>> field
>>>>> is input and left field is output and center field are
peripherals, 
>>>>> and
>>>>> interaction in that system is considered the ball, the interaction
>>>>> between keyboard and computer is caught translated and spoken as
is 
>>>>> the
>>>>> text going from computer to screen.  Sometimes done with sound
cards 
>>>>> and
>>>>> hardware speech synthesizers any more these days once there was a
time
>>>>> when the Screen Rover did it differently.  A camera was set up so
it
>>>>> could capture the screen and O.C.R. was done on camera input which
was
>>>>> converted to computer ascii and that ascii was then sent to a
hardware
>>>>> screen reader.  Unfortunately screen rover went off the market
since 
>>>>> if
>>>>> it hadn't blind people probably would been lots more effective
reading
>>>>> more sites and not having to deal with all of these accessibility
>>>>> issues.  The reason for me to install windows xp on a home
computer at
>>>>> all is to perhaps install cygwin and/or mingw and djgpp utilities
and
>>>>> see what type of unix-like development I can do successfully on
that
>>>>> platform.  Since I can't do this at work, I'm willing to
experiment 
>>>>> with
>>>>> a computer at home.
>>>>>
>>>>> -----Original Message-----
>>>>> From: programmingblind-bounce@xxxxxxxxxxxxx
>>>>> [mailto:programmingblind-bounce@xxxxxxxxxxxxx] On Behalf Of
>>>>> arachna@xxxxxxxxxxxx
>>>>> Sent: Friday, August 27, 2010 17:45
>>>>> To: programmingblind@xxxxxxxxxxxxx
>>>>> Subject: programming on Windows (was RE: Any support/suggestions
for a
>>>>> blind student)
>>>>>
>>>>> I ran across the following post in the list archives by accident
when
>>>>> searching for something with Google and it piqued my curiousity:
>>>>> "DaShiell, Jude T. CIV NAVAIR 1490, 1, 26" wrote on 16 March 2010:
>>>>>>As I see it, Microsoft made two mistakes with Windows which until
>>>>> they're corrected the best software for those
>>>>> of us with no memory of vision to program for will be Linux in its
>>>>> varied forms.
>>>>>>First, the command line interface was made into a very poorly
equipped
>>>>> environment for software development.
>>>>>>Second, if someone does console-based development of software
within
>>>>> Windows to my knowledge to date no xenity equivalents yet exist
for 
>>>>> any
>>>>> supported software development package now running on Windows; I
would
>>>>> love to be
>>>>> corrected on this point if at all possible even if packages under 
>>>>> active
>>>>> development are all that can be offered as suggestions.
>>>>>
>>>>>
>>>>> Would dialog be a decent replacement for zenity on Windows?  I
have a
>>>>> how-to on building dialog for OpenWatcom here:
>>>>> http://www.openwatcom.org/index.php/Dialog_howto
>>>>> It's very similar to build it on mingw and msys.  There are just a
few
>>>>> less places to patches.  I can put together the mingw patch if
someone
>>>>> needs it.
>>>>>
>>>>> By the way, did a quick search of zenity and win32 to check if
someone
>>>>> had ported it yet and ran across this:
>>>>> http://www.placella.com/software/zenity/
>>>>>
>>>>> I've been experimenting with the idea of using dialog with bash or

>>>>> v8cgi
>>>>> to create menus that will work in or out of X Windows on FreeBSD
and
>>>>> Linux.  Since I like to program cross-platform, the menus would
work 
>>>>> on
>>>>> Windows just as well.
>>>>>
>>>>> There are at least 3 versions of bash I know of for Windows.
Cygwin,
>>>>> djgpp and msys all have one.
>>>>> Here's a stand-alone package based on Cygwin:
>>>>> http://www.steve.org.uk/Software/bash/
>>>>>
>>>>> The other tool I've been looking at for cross-platform scripting
that
>>>>> I'm really starting to like is v8cgi:
>>>>> http://code.google.com/p/v8cgi/
>>>>> Syntax will be more familiar to C/C++ programmers than bash is.
>>>>>
>>>>> Since I'm not a blind user, I've been wondering just how the
visually
>>>>> impaired use console based tools.  Does the terminal emulator or
some
>>>>> such software read the information out loud, because the programs
>>>>> themselves usually don't add speech capability?  Read an example
on 
>>>>> the
>>>>> INX list where someone used tee and sent the information to espeak
as
>>>>> well as the menu.  I was wondering how hard it would be to add an 
>>>>> option
>>>>> to dialog that sent the information it drew out to another program

>>>>> like
>>>>> espeak.  However, if a screen reader program already exists and
works
>>>>> fine with dialog and other software, that would be a more general
>>>>> purpose solution.
>>>>>
>>>>> The other option I've been checking into is using the browser and
>>>>> Javascript for the programming environment, but the one thing
still
>>>>> lacking is being able to shell out to other local programs and use
the
>>>>> results.  There are some work-arounds for this specific to
browsers, 
>>>>> but
>>>>> I'm waiting to find out if a more portable solution becomes
available.
>>>>> What I'd really like is a merge of a Javascript server side
language
>>>>> like v8cgi with the ability to create an interface like a browser
can.
>>>>> Of course, since it could do local file access, the Internet
access 
>>>>> part
>>>>> should probably be shut off for security reasons.  The other
drawback 
>>>>> to
>>>>> the browser approach is that relatively few console based or light
>>>>> weight browsers fully support Javascript and css standards.
>>>>>
>>>>> Would be curious to know what's lacking in the Windows console
>>>>> environment for software development that's available in other
>>>>> environments like Linux.  I use mingw and msys all the time for
quick
>>>>> console development.  I use the DOS command prompt and have
customized
>>>>> it to a way I'm comfortable with, but other options like Console 2
are
>>>>> available and I believe Cygwin has a limited port of rxvt.  There
are 
>>>>> a
>>>>> number of good compilers that work from console mode, including
mingw,
>>>>> djgpp and OpenWatcom.  There are also some decent shell script 
>>>>> languages
>>>>> such as bash if batch files aren't enough.  I haven't found any
>>>>> information on ncurses working on Windows, but you do have
pdcurses. 
>>>>> I
>>>>> also I read about a Windows port of vifm to Windows, so I would
guess
>>>>> that means s-lang is available as well.
>>>>>
>>>>> Couldn't resist discussing this topic even though the original
post 
>>>>> was
>>>>> from some time ago.  I've been very interested in some of the
subjects
>>>>> and would enjoy hearing other programmers viewpoints on them as
well.
>>>>>
>>>>> Sincerely,
>>>>> Laura
>>>>> http://www.distasis.com/cpp
>>>>> __________
>>>>> View the list's information and change your settings at
>>>>> http://www.freelists.org/list/programmingblind
>>>>>
>>>>> __________
>>>>> View the list's information and change your settings at
>>>>> http://www.freelists.org/list/programmingblind
>>>>>
>>>>>
>>>> __________
>>>> View the list's information and change your settings at
>>>> http://www.freelists.org/list/programmingblind
>>>>
>>>>
>>> __________
>>> View the list's information and change your settings at
>>> http://www.freelists.org/list/programmingblind
>>>
>>
>> __________
>> View the list's information and change your settings at
>> http://www.freelists.org/list/programmingblind
>>
>>
> __________
> View the list's information and change your settings at
> http://www.freelists.org/list/programmingblind
>
> 
__________
View the list's information and change your settings at 
http://www.freelists.org/list/programmingblind

__________
View the list's information and change your settings at
http://www.freelists.org/list/programmingblind

Other related posts: