Re: help with c++ if test

Sina:
You could write it as Lex suggested, and just use a variable to check, whichever solution you choose, it would work fine. Here's my point. Goto is a tool. Like any tool in c/c++, it can be abused, but it can also be useful to jump out of code, or when you don't want code replication. if (!foo()) goto handleerror; if (!bar()) goto handleerror. I've used this... once, possibly twice when the code for handling such an error was kind of long and complex and I didn't want to try to pass everything through a function to accomplish the same thing.
On 2/9/2011 12:06 PM, Sina Bahram wrote:
Here's a new rule.

Assume that goto does not exist. Just get rid of it. It's gone, *waves hands*.

Now, rewrite that code.

Take care,
Sina



-----Original Message-----
From: programmingblind-bounce@xxxxxxxxxxxxx 
[mailto:programmingblind-bounce@xxxxxxxxxxxxx] On Behalf Of Kristoffer 
Gustafsson
Sent: Wednesday, February 09, 2011 2:03 PM
To: programmingblind@xxxxxxxxxxxxx
Subject: Re: help with c++ if test

Hi.
ok, some code of mine looks like
#include<iostream>
int main()
{
string test;
cin>>test;
if (test=="fine" goto good;

good:
cout<<"it works!";
return 0;
}

I try this and I get expected `before goto.
What can be wrong?
/Kristoffer

----- Original Message -----
From: "Ken Perry"<whistler@xxxxxxxxxxxxx>
To:<programmingblind@xxxxxxxxxxxxx>
Sent: Wednesday, February 09, 2011 7:53 PM
Subject: RE: help with c++ if test


It is easy to do text adventures or any programming without goto.  Note that
my commercial mud has 0 goto statements in it.  Now all classes in college
will tell you to avoid goto unless you're dealing with programming operating
systems and need to be able to jump out of scope.  Which is one of the
reasons you do not want to use goto.  For example

  Void myfunc(){
Goto two;
}

Void myFunc2(){
Two:

}

You can actually jump function to function with goto which breaks all kinds
of things in functional and object oriented programming.  Now that is
necessary some times when doing error handling.  The truth is though if your
coding your own application you really should never need goto.   If you find
yourself using goto you have probably designed your program wrong.

I will not go into a deep why or why not to use it because if your thinking
you cannot create an adventure game without it you will not understand a lot
of my explanation.  I think you need to go through some tutorials on c or
c++ which ever one you're using because you have a lot to learn.



Ken

-----Original Message-----
From: programmingblind-bounce@xxxxxxxxxxxxx
[mailto:programmingblind-bounce@xxxxxxxxxxxxx] On Behalf Of Kristoffer
Gustafsson
Sent: Wednesday, February 09, 2011 1:41 PM
To: programmingblind@xxxxxxxxxxxxx
Subject: Re: help with c++ if test

Hi.
Without goto it would be very hard to do text adventures.
I don't think it can be done, or can it?
Also, if I want my program to exit instead of continuing, how do I do?
I mean for example, if I die in an adventure, I want to exit the program at
that time, not continue the game.
/Kristoffer
----- Original Message -----
From: "Littlefield, Tyler"<tyler@xxxxxxxxxxxxx>
To:<programmingblind@xxxxxxxxxxxxx>
Sent: Wednesday, February 09, 2011 7:28 PM
Subject: Re: help with c++ if test


That produces all sorts of problems. jumping to the bottom of a loop is no
problem with a goto, and it avoids issues with your exiting variable. it's
also quicker, because you just jump to the bottom. otherwise you may
break, but it's still going to have to do one more check (two, actually,
depending on how the compiler does things) to see if exiting is false.
On 2/9/2011 11:23 AM, Lex wrote:
09.02.2011 20:17, Littlefield, Tyler пишет:
really really highly recommend you avoid goto. This isn't basic, and
they're not very useful except for in some odd cases, far and few
between. Such as jumping out of two nested loops like so:
int i, j;
for (i = 0; i<  100; i++)
{
for (j = 0; j<  100; j++)
{
if (i+j == 100)
goto botttom;
}
}
bottom:
//do something here
Actually, effect you're trying to achieve is more correctly by the
conditional variable (at least in terms of procedural programming):
bool exiting=false;
for (i = 0; i<  100&&  !exiting; i++)
{
for (j = 0; j<  100&&  !exiting; j++)
{
if (i+j == 100)
exiting=true;
}
}


or may be even
for (j = 0; j<  100; j++)
{
if (i+j == 100)
{
exiting=true;
break;
}
}
}


Lex

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Thanks,
Ty

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Thanks,
Ty

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