Re: edsharp and screen readers: suggestion

Alex,

This is the type of thing we do in Sodbeans. For a given programming
language, we create a "mapping" between what the syntax in the language is
and what the semantics of the language is. Then, depending on context, we
present the semantics cues instead of the raw syntax. Now, if you have a
syntax error, obviously you need the raw characters, so you can get that
too, but it's funny that you mention this, as it's exactly what we're doing.

And we ran a study comparing various cue architectures (e.g., syntax,
semantics). It isn't conclusive on this issue, but I think I can argue with
a certain degree of confidence that this idea actually does speed up working
with source code for the blind.

So, I heartily approve this message!

Stefik

On Thu, Oct 1, 2009 at 9:22 PM, Alex Hall <mehgcap@xxxxxxxxx> wrote:

> I tried this earlier today, and it did nothing! I think maybe it is the
> string being only punctuation that is throwing it off. I will keep playing
> with it, though.
>
>
> Have a great day,
> Alex
> New email address: mehgcap@xxxxxxxxx
> ----- Original Message ----- From: "The Elf" <inthaneelf@xxxxxxxxxxxxxx>
> To: <programmingblind@xxxxxxxxxxxxx>
> Sent: Thursday, October 01, 2009 4:30 PM
>
> Subject: Re: edsharp and screen readers: suggestion
>
>
>  ah, smile ahead of me by a mile already!
>>
>> of course its Jamal, what did I expect, lol!
>>
>> elf
>> proprietor, The Grab Bag,
>> for blind computer users and programmers
>> http://grabbag.alacorncomputer.com
>> Owner: Alacorn Computer Enterprises
>> "own the might and majesty of a Alacorn!"
>> www.alacorncomputer.com
>> ----- Original Message ----- From: "Homme, James" <
>> james.homme@xxxxxxxxxxxx>
>> To: <programmingblind@xxxxxxxxxxxxx>
>> Sent: Thursday, October 01, 2009 5:14 AM
>> Subject: RE: edsharp and screen readers: suggestion
>>
>>
>> Hi,
>> I'm not sure how many JAWS versions this goes back, but the dictionary
>> manager was really beefed up to include all kinds of neet stuff like playing
>> sounds, speaking strings with different voices, and so on. You could start
>> working on a personal dictionary file for EdSharp that would do this kind of
>> thing for you. I was just reading the dictionary manager help for the new
>> JAWS 11. It says you can use different synthesizers and voices to speak
>> things, play sounds for strings, speak and play sounds for strings at the
>> same time, and more. Just go into the dictionary manager and press F1 to get
>> into the documentation and check it out. I think you'll be able to solve
>> your issue this way.
>>
>> Jim
>>
>> -----Original Message-----
>> From: programmingblind-bounce@xxxxxxxxxxxxx [mailto:
>> programmingblind-bounce@xxxxxxxxxxxxx] On Behalf Of The Elf
>> Sent: Wednesday, September 30, 2009 5:13 PM
>> To: programmingblind@xxxxxxxxxxxxx
>> Subject: Re: edsharp and screen readers: suggestion
>>
>> interesting idea, I know it could be done in jaws, and probably window
>> eyes,
>> but the others I have no clue if it could be done, Jamal, if you decide to
>> add this, you might want to give it the option to use one of a set of very
>> short sounds for those readers that don't have multi voice output
>> abilities,
>> smile.
>>
>> take care,
>> elf
>> proprietor, The Grab Bag,
>> for blind computer users and programmers
>> http://grabbag.alacorncomputer.com
>> Owner: Alacorn Computer Enterprises
>> "own the might and majesty of a Alacorn!"
>> www.alacorncomputer.com
>> ----- Original Message -----
>> From: "Alex Hall" <mehgcap@xxxxxxxxx>
>> To: "Blind Programming List" <programmingblind@xxxxxxxxxxxxx>
>> Sent: Wednesday, September 30, 2009 11:07 AM
>> Subject: edsharp and screen readers: suggestion
>>
>>
>>  Hi all,
>>>
>>> I was thinking that it might be good to have an option to define certain
>>> character sequences to be spoken differently. For example, to be able to
>>> define == (two equals signs) to be spoken as "equals", but in the tutor
>>> message voice instead of the regular voice. This would help a lot when
>>> looking through code to see if you forgot an equals sign in an if
>>> statement or for loop; if you do not hear "equals" in the tutor voice,
>>> then there is only one equals sign there. Similar to this would be ++
>>> (plus plus), --  (dash dash), and any other sequence you want to define.
>>> What do people think?
>>>
>>>
>>> Have a great day,
>>> Alex
>>> New email address: mehgcap@xxxxxxxxx
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