Re: Your Experience with Braille Displays

Hey guys; Joseph, Robert, Oyvind, Delaunay, thanks a lot for your input -- I
really appreciate it tremendously. Thanks for taking the time.

It is really confirming my sespicions that the aid of a Braille display can
help much. I'm going to give this a try.

Quite cool that it works well under Windows with a screen reader like JAWS
and also works great under Linux/Unix with BRLTTY. It makes a lot of sense
that a 80 cell display would work great on the standard console terminal.
They unfortunately seem to be a fair bit more pricy.

And even more good news that indentation is easily perceived! Never mind
Python's syntactical dependance on indentation, you've got to indent all
code properly anyways.

Keep well, and please, if you have something to say about this topic, the
topic is still very much open for discussion

KR

On Thu, Jul 22, 2010 at 5:48 PM, Delaunay Christophe <
christophe.delaunay@xxxxxxxxxxxxxxx> wrote:

>  Hi Kerneels,
>
>
>
> You just wrote :
>
>
>
> [KR]
>
> >But how have you experienced programming with a Braille display at your
>
> >service?
>
>
>
> [ChD]
>
> Of course, the example of long lines, big conditionals in C ans so on is
> something I know more quickly with a braille display but line indendation is
> also quickly found. For instance, I really appreciate my braille display
> while manipulating Python code.
>
>
>
> [KR]
>
> >Has there been any particular model / make / design which you can
>
> >recommend above others?
>
>
>
> [ChD]
>
> In fact nowadays, there are many brands of braille displays, each one with
> its particular user interface. And even within a given brand, you can find
> different models with different user interfaces.
>
>
>
> For instance, I had an old Alva ABT 340, (40 cells display) and several
> different devices from F.H. Papenmeier. The design of my old ABT 340 is very
> different from the one of Alva Delphi, Satellite, BC6xx, … The same is true
> for Papenmeier devices.
>
>
>
> Within this variety of designs, some people will probably like one better
> than the others but what your preferred design would be is really
> subjective. A good idea is to attend great events like CSun, (there are
> probably such events closer to you), and to try several different displays.
>
>
>
> For instance, I really appreciate the Papenmeier easy access bar but many
> other people don’t like it at all. I am quite uncomfortable with too large
> displays. Personnally, I hardly prefer 66 cells displays rather than 80
> cells displays.
>
>
>
> Among the braille displays I had or have right now, I can’t say that one of
> these devices should be avoided. They all had their own qualities and all of
> them could be used during at least 10 years 8 hours per work day.
>
>
> [KR]
>
> >And how about screen reader compattibility?
>
>
>
> [ChD]
>
> I regularly use jaws to develop under windows, and brltty under linux. In
> jaws, I have my best performance with Visual Studio when the display is set
> in what they call “line” mode.
>
>
>
> [KR]
>
> >And lastly, has there been any particular language you absolutely could
>
> >not get any joy with while trying to read code with a Braille display?
>
>
>
> [ChD]
>
> Personnally, I did not have problem with such or such languages but with
> IDEs. Some like Visual Studio are quite accessible. Some others like Visual
> Café are a little less, and some others I don’t remember their names are
> totally unusable. However, I did not yet encounter situations where I had
> better results with speech than with braille.
>
>
>
> HTH. Have a nice day. Chris D
>



-- 
Kerneels Roos
Cell/SMS: +27 (0)82 309 1998
Skype: cornelis.roos

Other related posts: