Re: What's wrong with my code?

I dunno. You're right, there's nothing wrong with it, but I hate seeing code that defines variables for command line arguments when none will ever be applicable. It's like including unnecessary libraries from a readability standpoint if not quite a programatic one. Some make you include them anyway though, like Java.


On 7/6/2010 11:44 AM, Tyler Littlefield wrote:
Eh? The added code? It's not "added," nor is it a problem. It's for receiving 
command line arguments.
                Thanks,
Tyler Littlefield
        http://tds-solutions.net
        Twitter: sorressean

On Jul 6, 2010, at 9:36 AM, Joseph Lee wrote:

Hi,
The added code is done from VS (I remember having that problem and fixed it by 
creating a general CPP project).
Cheers,
Joseph

-----Original Message-----
From: programmingblind-bounce@xxxxxxxxxxxxx 
[mailto:programmingblind-bounce@xxxxxxxxxxxxx] On Behalf Of Alex Midence
Sent: Tuesday, July 06, 2010 8:25 AM
To: programmingblind@xxxxxxxxxxxxx
Subject: Re: What's wrong with my code?

Hi, all,

This looks like something I'm working on too.  I've a question though:

Why do books tell you to write:
int main()

but, I've seen folks here and on some websites I've  looked at write:

Int main  (int argc; char; **) or something like that?

Thanks,
Alex M


On 7/6/10, Dave<davidct1209@xxxxxxxxx>  wrote:
Hi Jes,

Something helpful that folks do in industry (not so much in academia
from my experience though) is called a code review where people insert
specific comments on selected lines of code.  I'll go ahead and do
that below prefixing my comments with "dave:".  Ken and Joseph had
some great comments as well.

//Ch5 Exercise 4, page 287 //Calculates and displays the average of
three test scores
dave:  "//" only need one per line.  You only need to put another "//"
if you start a new line (it doesn't matter how many sentences you have
in a comment as long as they're still on the same line.)

//created/revised by Jes Smith on July 5 2010


#include<iostream>
using<<std::cout;>>
using<<std::cin;>>
using<<std::endl;>>
dave: "using" has the purpose of restricting namespaces such as "using
namespace std;".  This has the effect of letting you say
cout<<  "hello!"
as opposed to
std::cout<<  "hello!"
It's a good topic to read up on in a C++ book.

//declare variables
int score_1 (0);
int score_2 (0);
int score_3 (0);
dave:  these are declared with global scope; you may want to consider
putting them in the main routine below.  Also, simple types like int
or float can be assigned to (such as int a = 0;).

//begin program
int main()
{
cout<  "Please enter your first test score. You may enter decimal values:"
;
dave:  the "<>" syntax can be tricky here.  the"<<" operator directs
the string on the right to the stream on the left.  It should be
written as
cout<<  "hello!";

cin<<  score_1>>;
cin<<score_2>>  ;
cin<<score_3>>  ;
dave:  Think of cin as an in-coming stream which you want to direct
elsewhere.  The "cin" blob is just a user typing stuff and you want to
direct it to a variable.  To do this, you can write
cin>>  some_var;
The cin object only "writes" to the variable when the user presses enter.

return 0
}



Hth!
Dave

On 7/5/10, Hrvoje Katić<hrvojekatic@xxxxxxxxx>  wrote:
Hi,

Instead of writing
using std::bla
it's enough to write
using namespace std

Hrvoje

On 6.7.2010 5:54, Jes wrote:
Hi all,
This is a programming assignment I'm trying to do out of the class
text book. Any assistance would be appreciated, as well as any
feedback on how I am doing writing the code. I have this habit of not
writing the code all the way through, and compiling the program bit by
bit to make sure I don't get any errors in the process of coding. I
just want to make sure that the code I have already written is working
as it should before I continue writing. I'm sure this is not a good
habit to get into.
Thanks for any help.
Jes

//Ch5 Exercise 4, page 287 //Calculates and displays the average of
three test scores
//created/revised by Jes Smith on July 5 2010

#include<iostream>
using<<std::cout;>>
using<<std::cin;>>
using<<std::endl;>>

//declare variables
int score_1 (0);
int score_2 (0);
int score_3 (0);

//begin program
int main()
{
cout<  "Please enter your first test score. You may enter decimal
values: ">;
cin<<  score_1>>;
cin<<score_2>>  ;
cin<<score_3>>  ;

return 0
}


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