RE: Searching for blind programmer to start a school for blind programmers

Um Jim I think you forget the flames only come when that same question is
asked by the same person repeatedly.  I have never seen a new person be
flamed ever if I am wrong please point me at the posts.

Ken



-----Original Message-----
From: programmingblind-bounce@xxxxxxxxxxxxx
[mailto:programmingblind-bounce@xxxxxxxxxxxxx] On Behalf Of Homme, James
Sent: Friday, April 08, 2011 12:41 PM
To: programmingblind@xxxxxxxxxxxxx
Subject: RE: Searching for blind programmer to start a school for blind
programmers

Hi,
I agree with this. I will add, though, that the way we mostly learn this is
through trial and error. I think it would help if we would put together some
organized plan or plans of attack, even if it's nothing more than a little
guide somewhere on a web site like, you guessed it,
Nonvisualdevelopment.org. I started to help with that site out of the
frustration of having person after person come to this list, ask the same,
beginner, questions, and get a bunch of disorganized, flame-ridden
responses, and needless noise.

Jim Homme,
Usability Services,
Phone: 412-544-1810. Skype: jim.homme
Highmark recipients,  Read my accessibility blog. Discuss accessibility
here. Accessibility Wiki: Breaking news and accessibility advice


-----Original Message-----
From: programmingblind-bounce@xxxxxxxxxxxxx
[mailto:programmingblind-bounce@xxxxxxxxxxxxx] On Behalf Of Dave
Sent: Friday, April 08, 2011 12:29 PM
To: programmingblind@xxxxxxxxxxxxx
Subject: Re: Searching for blind programmer to start a school for blind
programmers

The lack of employment for the blind isn't exclusive to those who
choose to be developers.  It's a more general problem of inequities in
education, resources, and socialization to which many blind folks
face.

At least from my personal experience, the journey of discovering one's
own path towards an accessible environment whether it be a virtual one
used for development or a physical one to navigate through unfamiliar
geographic regions is valuable in it of itself and is an individual
skill that one needs to learn for him/herself.  If someone's serious
about doing professional development along side sighted colleagues,
you will have to "roll" your own accessibility and often times that
means digging into systems or spending extra time automating tasks.
It's not for everyone :).  In short, that means you need an even
deeper understanding of frameworks, OS's, and general computer science
theory than your average "programmer".


On 4/8/11, Bryan Garaventa <bgaraventa11@xxxxxxxxxxxxxx> wrote:
> I believe the answer to 'why are there fewer when there is more access to
> knowledge' has to do with an irony actually. In general things are much
more
> accessible than they used to be, and there are many more accessible
> distractions available to everyone. Necessity drives innovation after all,
> so if there is less necessity for the general population, less people will
> be compelled to test the bounds of innovation.
>
>
> ----- Original Message -----
> From: "Bill Cox" <waywardgeek@xxxxxxxxx>
> To: <programmingblind@xxxxxxxxxxxxx>
> Sent: Friday, April 08, 2011 8:20 AM
> Subject: Re: Searching for blind programmer to start a school for blind
> programmers
>
>
> On Fri, Apr 8, 2011 at 9:58 AM, Ken Perry <whistler@xxxxxxxxxxxxx> wrote:
>> I think trying to just teach programming though is counterproductive
>> because the classes in college do that rather well. I guess teaching
>> people
>> to use tools might be a better goal then teaching coding.
>
> Well, you may be right.  With the web, learning just about anything is
> so much easier than when I was a kid.  What remains a mystery to me is
> why we're not seeing blind kids going nuts programming computers.
> Surely they have plenty of access to them in the US.  Is there
> anything that can be done to inspire the new generation of blind kids
> to dive in and learn what's under the hood?  Why do so few seem to
> make it?
>
> Bill
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