RE: Now I Know Why I'm Having Trouble With Objects

Hi Ty,
Very cool. I will check tonight. I was on for a little while last night. Maybe 
I missed the request.

Jim

Jim Homme,
Usability Services,
Phone: 412-544-1810. Skype: jim.homme. NonVisualDevelopment.org: Blind people 
can drive computers<http://www.nonvisualdevelopment.org/>. Demonstration GUI 
Programs: You can program GUI's while blind.<http://www.fruitbasketdemos.org/>

From: programmingblind-bounce@xxxxxxxxxxxxx 
[mailto:programmingblind-bounce@xxxxxxxxxxxxx] On Behalf Of Littlefield, Tyler
Sent: Wednesday, April 13, 2011 11:44 AM
To: programmingblind@xxxxxxxxxxxxx
Subject: Re: Now I Know Why I'm Having Trouble With Objects

well, I kind of pegged battleship because it would let you define pieces (the 
different ships) so you could get a feel for it. if you just want to let 
someone move around the board with chess though and implement the rules, that 
works. Either way, the offer to help you is still open--I sent the skype 
request last night.
On 4/13/2011 9:26 AM, Homme, James wrote:

Hi Ty,

I really don't care. I just want to learn this. It's just that I'm interested 
in chess and thought I'd stick to it, but Battle Ship is just fine with me.



Jim



Jim Homme,

Usability Services,

Phone: 412-544-1810. Skype: jim.homme. NonVisualDevelopment.org: Blind people 
can drive computers<http://www.nonvisualdevelopment.org/>. Demonstration GUI 
Programs: You can program GUI's while blind.<http://www.fruitbasketdemos.org/>



From: 
programmingblind-bounce@xxxxxxxxxxxxx<mailto:programmingblind-bounce@xxxxxxxxxxxxx>
 [mailto:programmingblind-bounce@xxxxxxxxxxxxx] On Behalf Of Littlefield, Tyler
Sent: Wednesday, April 13, 2011 9:34 AM
To: programmingblind@xxxxxxxxxxxxx<mailto:programmingblind@xxxxxxxxxxxxx>
Subject: Re: Now I Know Why I'm Having Trouble With Objects



does it have to be chess? you could get easier and make battleship!
On 4/13/2011 5:37 AM, Ken Perry wrote:

I figured that much which is why I suggested different kinds of games but 
really if you want to make an object-oriented chess piece for fun then my 
suggestion would be to make a piece that knew what it was it would be a simple 
class that you initialize and then tell it to do something if it's the right 
piece it will return true if it's the wrong its false a simple layout of that 
class would be something like





Class ChessPiece

String pos="";





Constructor (String pieceType, int color,String pos)

Bool   Move (String mv)

Private Bool checkMove(String mv);

Private setPos(String pos)

String PossibleMoves()





This is a very simple piece class where you could do something like this in a 
game



Piece=ChessPiece("King","White","E1");

If (!piece.move("e5"){

Do some act  or something

}else{

Success do some act or something.

}





The two private functions would be used in move and I am sure there are other 
functions you could come up with like private function to check if the move 
position is even on the board or things of that sort.



Ken  Again the problem with chess is there are just so many ways to define this 
problem.



Ken







From: 
programmingblind-bounce@xxxxxxxxxxxxx<mailto:programmingblind-bounce@xxxxxxxxxxxxx>
 [mailto:programmingblind-bounce@xxxxxxxxxxxxx] On Behalf Of Homme, James
Sent: Wednesday, April 13, 2011 7:25 AM
To: programmingblind@xxxxxxxxxxxxx<mailto:programmingblind@xxxxxxxxxxxxx>
Subject: RE: Now I Know Why I'm Having Trouble With Objects



Hi Ken,

The only thing I want to do is to check to see if the moves are valid moves. I 
don't care about making the computer win the game. The program is eventually 
going to be a portable game notation file reader and writer when I get up to 
i/o. Right now, I'm just finishing up about arrays, so I was thinking about 
starting out simply. My first program would be one that asks for a move from 
the keyboard. Someone would type in something like e4 or Nf3, and the program 
would check to see things like can that piece move there, is it your turn, did 
you get the syntax of the move wrong, can you move there because one of your 
own pieces is on that square. It's just a way to have a project that I'm 
interested in. I could do Monopoly or something, too, if it works better. I 
just want to learn this stuff and be happy.



Thanks.



Jim



Jim Homme,

Usability Services,

Phone: 412-544-1810. Skype: jim.homme. NonVisualDevelopment.org: Blind people 
can drive computers<http://www.nonvisualdevelopment.org/>. Demonstration GUI 
Programs: You can program GUI's while blind.<http://www.fruitbasketdemos.org/>



From: 
programmingblind-bounce@xxxxxxxxxxxxx<mailto:programmingblind-bounce@xxxxxxxxxxxxx>
 [mailto:programmingblind-bounce@xxxxxxxxxxxxx] On Behalf Of Ken Perry
Sent: Tuesday, April 12, 2011 10:57 PM
To: programmingblind@xxxxxxxxxxxxx<mailto:programmingblind@xxxxxxxxxxxxx>
Subject: RE: Now I Know Why I'm Having Trouble With Objects



Jim,



I want to make a small suggestion.  Your starting out with a very difficult 
problem to use OOPO to solve.  The truth is there are a lot of ways you can do 
this for a chess game and none of them are really that good.   The problem is 
chess is really just  search tree and a state machine and making objects out of 
nouns and methods out of actions will not make the best of the chess games.  If 
you're looking to learn OOP I would suggest a game like Monopoly or Life where 
you can actually have Objects work as they should for example you could have 
players on Monopoly, locations that have descriptions, prices, and things of 
the sort.  Maybe start with a card game where you can have objects that deal 
with decks of cards and players and score cards and things of the sort.    It's 
really up to you but Chess gets too complicated to fast and then you're not 
really thinking OOP your trying to decide the best method of figuring out who 
is winning which is a tougher problem then you might think.



Ken



From: 
programmingblind-bounce@xxxxxxxxxxxxx<mailto:programmingblind-bounce@xxxxxxxxxxxxx>
 [mailto:programmingblind-bounce@xxxxxxxxxxxxx] On Behalf Of Homme, James
Sent: Tuesday, April 12, 2011 3:27 PM
To: programmingblind@xxxxxxxxxxxxx<mailto:programmingblind@xxxxxxxxxxxxx>
Subject: RE: Now I Know Why I'm Having Trouble With Objects



Hi,

If it's OK, I'd like to take this a little further. I was thinking about my  
little chess move validation project. I thought I would sit down and try to 
write out a little plan, because my book says that the nouns become objects, 
but I started to get confused when I asked myself this question. Do the pieces 
move, do the squares on the board somehow get pieces, or does some controller 
in the sky move the pieces? In the real world, the controller would be the 
player who is moving the pieces. The pieces can't move them selves, and all the 
board can do is sit there and have pieces on its squares. The rules would be 
another object, would they not? Oh my head.



Jim



Jim Homme,

Usability Services,

Phone: 412-544-1810. Skype: jim.homme. NonVisualDevelopment.org: Blind people 
can drive computers<http://www.nonvisualdevelopment.org/>. Demonstration GUI 
Programs: You can program GUI's while blind.<http://www.fruitbasketdemos.org/>



From: 
programmingblind-bounce@xxxxxxxxxxxxx<mailto:programmingblind-bounce@xxxxxxxxxxxxx>
 [mailto:programmingblind-bounce@xxxxxxxxxxxxx] On Behalf Of Homme, James
Sent: Tuesday, April 12, 2011 3:20 PM
To: programmingblind@xxxxxxxxxxxxx<mailto:programmingblind@xxxxxxxxxxxxx>
Subject: Now I Know Why I'm Having Trouble With Objects



Hi,

I found this humorous.



Understanding the Parts of VBA "Speech"



If you were going to play soccer using BASIC, the instruction to kick a ball 
would look something like



"Kick the Ball"



Hey-this is how we talk! It makes sense. You have a verb (kick) and then a noun 
(the ball). In the BASIC code in the preceding section, you have a verb

(print) and a noun (an asterisk). Life is good.



Here is the problem. VBA doesn't work like this. No object-oriented language 
works like this. In an object-oriented language, the objects (the nouns) are

most important (hence, the name: object oriented). If you are going to play 
soccer with VBA, the basic structure would be:



Ball.Kick



You have a noun-the ball. It comes first. In VBA, this is an object

. Then you have the verb-to kick. It comes next. In VBA, this is a method.



The basic structure of VBA is a bunch of lines of code where you have



Object.Method



Sorry, this is not English. If you took a romance language in high school, you 
will remember that they used a "noun adjective" construct, but I don't know

anyone who speaks in "noun verb" when telling someone to do something. Do you 
talk like this?



Water.Drink

Food.Eat

Girl.Kiss



Of course not. That is why VBA is so confusing to someone who previously 
stepped foot in a procedural programming class.



Let's carry the analogy on a bit. Imagine you walk onto a grassy field and 
there are five balls in front of you. There is a soccer ball, a basketball, a

baseball, a bowling ball, and a tennis ball. You want to instruct the kid on 
your soccer team to



Kick the soccer ball



If you tell him kick the ball (or ball.kick

), you really aren't sure which one he will kick. Maybe he will kick the one 
closest to him. This could be a real problem if he is standing in front of

the bowling ball.





Jim



Jim Homme,

Usability Services,

Phone: 412-544-1810. Skype: jim.homme. NonVisualDevelopment.org: Blind people 
can drive computers<http://www.nonvisualdevelopment.org/>. Demonstration GUI 
Programs: You can program GUI's while blind.<http://www.fruitbasketdemos.org/>





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--



Thanks,

Ty




--



Thanks,

Ty

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