Re: Good resource for beginning programmers

I have no idea what your running, but last I bluescreened was when I had bad hardware...

On 11/18/2010 7:16 PM, Ken Perry wrote:
Um hard to get a blue screen.   Hmm what is hard like once a day or twice?

Ken

-----Original Message-----
From: programmingblind-bounce@xxxxxxxxxxxxx
[mailto:programmingblind-bounce@xxxxxxxxxxxxx] On Behalf Of Sina Bahram
Sent: Thursday, November 18, 2010 3:32 PM
To: programmingblind@xxxxxxxxxxxxx
Subject: RE: Good resource for beginning programmers

Oh for sure.

Otherwise, all you're going to do is simply crash your own program. It's
hard to even get a old fashioned blue screen anymore, much
less accidentally corrupt someone else's address space.

Take care,
Sina

-----Original Message-----
From: programmingblind-bounce@xxxxxxxxxxxxx
[mailto:programmingblind-bounce@xxxxxxxxxxxxx] On Behalf Of Littlefield,
Tyler
Sent: Thursday, November 18, 2010 3:28 PM
To: programmingblind@xxxxxxxxxxxxx
Subject: Re: Good resource for beginning programmers

Hahaha. That sounds fun. I guess the point I'm trying to make: you have to
intentionally try to get to this point. You can do these
lovely things, but in order to get there, you have to knowingly escolate
privileges, inject code, whatever.
On 11/18/2010 1:24 PM, Sina Bahram wrote:
Nope, none of them require API's.

You can do some really weird things with privilege escalation, and
then it's all over. Jump to lib attacks, return oriented programming,
jump oriented programming, basic stack smashing, basic heap overflows, dll
injection, ring -1, -2, and -3 level attacks depending
on virtualization technologies being used, page table corruption attacks,
chain of trust invalidation, etc, etc, etc.
That's only the latest stuff. You'd be amazed how many attacks from
pre 2005 still work. For example, you overwrite the interrupt
descriptor table, grab some debug registers, point one of them at your
page fault exception handler, and it's over ... There is no
way to detect that sucker, no matter how good your antivirus is.
Take care,
Sina

-----Original Message-----
From: programmingblind-bounce@xxxxxxxxxxxxx
[mailto:programmingblind-bounce@xxxxxxxxxxxxx] On Behalf Of
Littlefield, Tyler
Sent: Thursday, November 18, 2010 3:18 PM
To: programmingblind@xxxxxxxxxxxxx
Subject: Re: Good resource for beginning programmers

Well, you need to go through an API usually, no? It's not going to happen
with a dangling pointer in a normal app.
On 11/18/2010 1:16 PM, Sina Bahram wrote:
Not hard at all, just minorly annoying.

Take care,
Sina

-----Original Message-----
From: programmingblind-bounce@xxxxxxxxxxxxx
[mailto:programmingblind-bounce@xxxxxxxxxxxxx] On Behalf Of
Littlefield, Tyler
Sent: Thursday, November 18, 2010 3:04 PM
To: programmingblind@xxxxxxxxxxxxx
Subject: Re: Good resource for beginning programmers

That's what I was getting at; the whole virtual addressing and stuff. He
was making it sound as if:
int i[10]
i[10]=300
Was going to make things go boom. :) I jus didn't want the OP to be
scared off. Windows and *nix both have virtual addressing, so accessing
bob's process from joe's process is fairly hard.
On 11/18/2010 12:57 PM, qubit wrote:
Hi Ty -- I am not sure about windows so take this with a grain of
salt, but it is true that an OS does have some protections, such as
preventing writing to someone else's virtual memory, to guard
against malware.  However a truely pathological C++ program can use
pointers to do some interesting things with stack frames that will cause
a lot of very strange behavior.
But no, it won't go outside the process's virtual space, fortunately.
And perhaps it varies with the OS.
Keep in mind though that a debugger is just a program, and needs to
have the ability to control a process and therefore needs to be able
to write to addresses that are otherwise protected.
I particularly enjoyed debugger development when I was working in
language support.  It is fascinating to me to see how a process is
implemented.
--le

----- Original Message -----
From: "Littlefield, Tyler"<tyler@xxxxxxxxxxxxx>
To:<programmingblind@xxxxxxxxxxxxx>
Sent: Wednesday, November 17, 2010 7:32 PM
Subject: Re: Good resource for beginning programmers


You're making c++ sound way way to dangerous. If you mess up with a
pointer, unless you're programming at a way way low level and
directly accessing the harddrive, you're not going to trash anything.
You have access to memory, but like I said before when you went off
on this "c++ can blow up the world," thing, the OS protects
programmers from themselves. Or sort of, anyway.
On 11/17/2010 6:20 PM, Alex Midence wrote:
Good lord, no!  php might be written in c++ but, I promise you that
you can not do the same things.  Php won't have stuff like template
metaprogramming, generic programming nor will it compile right down
to binary like c++.  If you write stuff in c++, it runs lightning fast.
I don't know the syntax to php but, I'm pretty sure it's too
different from c++ to be concsidered a dialect.  Python is
definitely nothing like c in its syntax.  And, you could never
program a driver in Python.  It would take forever if it runs at
all.  They are not dialects of the languages they are written in.
I wish someone who was a bonified computer scientist could jump in
and explain this in terms more fitting.  Scripting languages are used
primarily for tweaking.
Look at the Jaws scripting language, for instance.  Languages like
Python and lua are used to customize applicatiosn written in stuff
like c++ so that they don't have to rewrite the whole app and
recompile it just for a few modifications.  It's hard to explain.
Honestly, you will just have to do some research until you find
something that explains it to you in a way that will make sense to
you.

Yes, the lines between some scripting languages and programming
languages are becoming blurred but the great yawning chasm that
will never be crossed is still the interpreted versus compiled chasm.
You might technically be able to write an application from the
ground up in pure Python but, I promise you that if that thing goes
toe to toe with another version of the same application written in
c++, it will lose every time.  By the time the Python app is done
printing out its welcome message, the c++ app has done what was asked
of it and closed.
      This is because there are too many layers between the app and
the binary code for it.  It's first got to go through the
interpreter which then puts it into binary.  The app written in c++
runs right on the system itself.  You have to go to something like
c or asm to get lower level.  The isntructions to the computer
don't have to be translated before execution.  The day when what
you mention with regard to making something like c++ available to
the nonprogrammer is way way far off in the future if it will ever
come.
I frandkly hope it doesn't  The thought of some nonprogrammers I
know with acces to that kind of computing power is frightening.  I
mean, you can tell the computer exactly what to do right down to
what goes where in each individual piece of memory.  There are no
shortcuts in that language.
And, there shouldn't be.  It gives you so many chances to shoot
yourself in the foot that if you aren't down in the inner workings
of it, as it were, under the proverbial hood, you won't be able to
control what it does.  You could realistically totally trash a hard
drive if you screw up just right with pointers and if you do
something like overflowing an array of 10 items with say 100 or
something like that.  I hear you can do some serious damage with stuff
like that.
Can't see that kind of damage being caused by php or python.

Alex M

On 11/17/10, Client Services<operations@xxxxxxxxxxxxxxx>      wrote:
Hi-
Thank you for that explanation.
Seems like the line between programming and scripting languages is
getting blurred.
Are scripting languages becoming as powerful as a programming
language?
Or
do they just bring the best out of the programming language they
are written in.
If PHP and Python are written in C and C++, then why can't they
make PHP and Python to be more like a CMS and useable by
non-programmers?
In summary, if I have this correct, a scripting language is
actually written in a programming language and is just a way of
accessing and using the given programming language.
When I use PHP and Python, I am actually using C and C++, just in
a unique dialect?  That is assuming Python and PHP are written in
C or
C++.
So somehow, PHP and Python were supposed to make C or what ever
programming language easier to use?
Is this accurate?
Sorry for the dumb questions.

H.R. Soltani

-----Original Message-----
From: programmingblind-bounce@xxxxxxxxxxxxx
[mailto:programmingblind-bounce@xxxxxxxxxxxxx] On Behalf Of
Christopher
Sent: Wednesday, November 17, 2010 6:24 PM
To: programmingblind@xxxxxxxxxxxxx
Subject: Re: Good resource for beginning programmers

This is one of my pet peeves.

A programming language is a language that is, in the majority of
the cases, compiled to native machine code -and- used for
application development (i.e. C, C++, D) A scripting language is a
language that is, in the majority of the cases, interpreted -and-
used to control applications, and sometimes application development in
general (i.e.
Python, PHP, Ruby, AutoIT, etc.) Java was not a true programming
language until recently when it decided to compile its bytecode
on-the-fly. C# has always been a programming language because it
has always compiled its MSIL on-the-fly. PHP and Python are both
written in C and are both interpreted. (PHP might be written in
C++.)

I refuse to call a non-compiled language a programming language,
regardless of the language.

So, here is a simple test to see what is a programming language
and what is a scripting language.

1. Can you write a full application in the language? If yes, then
is the language compiled? If yes, then it is a programming language.
2. Can you write a full application in the language? If yes, then
is the language compiled? If no, then it is a scripting language.
3. Can you write a full application in the language? If no, then
it is a scripting language.


On 11/17/2010 2:24 PM, Alex Midence wrote:
I am not at a stage in my learning where I can do well at
explaining this so, I have provided some links for you to explore:

Scripting language
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Scripting_language

Programming language:

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Programming_language

Be warned:  This will create more questions for you.  Have fun!!!

Alex M




On 11/17/10, Client Services<operations@xxxxxxxxxxxxxxx>       wrote:
Hi-
What is the difference between a scripting language and a
programming language?
So if PHP and Python are scripting languages, what programming
language
are
they written in?
And why are they called scripting languages?

H.R. Soltani


-----Original Message-----
From: programmingblind-bounce@xxxxxxxxxxxxx
[mailto:programmingblind-bounce@xxxxxxxxxxxxx] On Behalf Of Alex
Midence
Sent: Wednesday, November 17, 2010 3:52 PM
To: programmingblind@xxxxxxxxxxxxx
Subject: Re: Good resource for beginning programmers

You've got scripting languages and programming languages there.
Javascript is client side scripting.  Websites run scripts on
the visitor's machine to dynamically change themselves according
to stimuli.  Php is a scripting language that does dynamic
webpage changing among other things from the server side.  It is
used in conjunction with database solutions like my sql and the
like.
Java and C are both programming languages.  Java is a high level
object-oriented language that runs on a virtual machine.  It is
used to create applets and web apps for all sorts of functions.
Java is also used to create desktop  applicaitons like, for
instance, Eclipse, Open Office, and things of that nature.  C is
a low-level procedural programming language that is used for
desktop aplications and low-level programming such as drivers,
utilities and the like.
Certain platforms are also written in C like, for instance,
Windoes is in C.  I believe Gnome was also written in C.  I went
into this detail because your post indicated that you thought
these were all web development languages and they are not.
Python is a scripting language that can do a lot of the same
things programming languages can do and has a reputation for
being easy to learn and fostering rapid development.  An
applications that php could not create, IMHO is a screen reader.
Python was used to create two of them.
Hope that helps,
Alex M


On 11/17/10, Client Services<operations@xxxxxxxxxxxxxxx>       wrote:
Hi everybody-
I am trying to decide where to start as far as learning
programming.
I decided I would focus on 1. PHP, 2. JavaScript, 3. Java, 4. C
I figured these are being used the most in web development and
custom applications. So, where does Python come in?  How would
you compare
Python
with Java, PHP, and C??
Can anybody give me an example of what cannot be developed in
PHP which
can
be developed in Python?
Or how about Java vs Python if PHP is to lowly?  I have just
heard PHP
has
limitations.



H.R. Soltani
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--

Thanks,
Ty

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