Re: Cross platform speech API

Ken,

Currently, I don't think it would do Braille output for each platform.
It "might" work on Mac, and might work with JAWS, but we actually
don't own a braille display in our lab, so I really am unsure.

It's an open source tool though, so if you want to add support for a
particular platform, you are surely welcome to do so,

Stefik

On Mon, Dec 13, 2010 at 11:09 PM, Ken Perry <whistler@xxxxxxxxxxxxx> wrote:
> Does this include braille output as well or only speech?  It would be nice
> to have a cross platform way of doing both for example brltty could be added
> in.
>
> Ken
>
>
> -----Original Message-----
> From: programmingblind-bounce@xxxxxxxxxxxxx
> [mailto:programmingblind-bounce@xxxxxxxxxxxxx] On Behalf Of Andreas Stefik
> Sent: Monday, December 13, 2010 10:56 PM
> To: programmingblind@xxxxxxxxxxxxx
> Subject: Re: Cross platform speech API
>
> I should say also that, starting in Sodbeans 1.5, we have
> automatically routed all that complicated text-to-speech work into our
> programming language, Hop, which is a general purpose programming
> language we've created in my lab. In our programming language, to
> write a program that connects to any supported environment or screen
> reader, an entire program would be:
>
> say "Hello, world!"
>
> And that's all. It can't get easier than that!
>
> Sodbeans 1.5 isn't out though, although we're ahead of schedule and
> might actually release this week, if our final testing goes well.
>
> Here's a link to our wiki:
>
> http://sourceforge.net/apps/trac/sodbeans/wiki
>
> Stefik
>
> On Mon, Dec 13, 2010 at 9:51 PM, Andreas Stefik <stefika@xxxxxxxxx> wrote:
>> We have our own open source solution to do this on the Sappy/Sodbeans
>> projects. Currently it supports:
>>
>> 1. Mac with basic Voice Over compatibility
>> 2. Windows XP 32, Vista and 7, 32 and 64
>> 3. JAWS compatibility
>> 4. NVDA compatibility
>>
>> And I just hired another developer to add Vinux and Ubuntu support,
>> and to massively revamp the documentation, next semester, which should
>> make it much easier to get up and running with it. You can access
>> basic TTS from either Java, C++, or as a NetBeans platform module. The
>> only real catch right now is that our documentation for that part of
>> the project kind of stinks --- but --- it works.
>>
>> If you want more information, please feel free to take a gander at the
>> Sappy and Sodbeans projects on sourceforge. Sappy contains the Mac and
>> Windows implementations of the TTS engine. Sodbeans includes those
>> implementations into a NetBeans platform application, routing the
>> tools through Java, C++, and Objective C.
>>
>> Yaa, let me tell you, writing cross-platform TTS apps can be quite an
>> ordeal! It's open source, so even if you don't use it directly, it
>> might help,
>>
>> Stefik
>>
>> On Sun, Dec 12, 2010 at 6:22 AM, QuentinC <quentinc@xxxxxxxxxxx> wrote:
>>> Yes, espeak is one possible solution: I would say, as a last ressort
>>> solution, because the voice is horrible. But why not.
>>> I would prefer using  jaws, NVDA or whatever screen reader first, because
> of
>>> their better voices.
>>>
>>> I had already tried to use espeak on windows, but I didn't succeeded so
> far.
>>> I will continue to try.
>>>
>>>
>>
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