RE: Bjarne Stroustrup talks about c++ and upcoming features in the language

Hi Joseph,
Thanks for pointing these out.

Jim

-----Original Message-----
From: programmingblind-bounce@xxxxxxxxxxxxx 
[mailto:programmingblind-bounce@xxxxxxxxxxxxx] On Behalf Of Joseph Lee
Sent: Thursday, March 10, 2011 4:26 AM
To: programmingblind@xxxxxxxxxxxxx; programmingblind@xxxxxxxxxxxxxxx?
Subject: Re: Bjarne Stroustrup talks about c++ and upcoming features in 
thelanguage

Hi,
I see.  The best books for looking at data structs would be (from
OReilly and obtained from Bookshare):
* Practical C++ Programming - which provides some code segments,
which helped me learn basic theory behind class design.
* Mastering Algorithms in C: Some concepts behind things like
quicksort and other useful ones.  Uses C code, but easily
adaptable to CPP.
* Data Structures and Algorithms in Java
and
Java Cookbook - useful as a reference for Java code and how to do
data structs with it.
Cheers,
Joseph
 ----- Original Message -----
From: "Littlefield, Tyler" <tyler@xxxxxxxxxxxxx
To: programmingblind@xxxxxxxxxxxxx
Date sent: Wed, 09 Mar 2011 22:13:02 -0700
Subject: Re: Bjarne Stroustrup talks about c++ and upcoming
features in thelanguage

Joseph: that makes sense now; I hope my last message didn't come
across
as rude, i was just curious.  I was kind of trying to figure out
where
you were, since Sina's idea was totally different from your own.
I agree
with you that learning more languages is always useful; it's good
to
learn different languages.  When I say "learn" a language, I mean
be able
to quickly develop in it, understand the stdlib that it uses,
etc, as
well as employ the techniques.  For example, Java programmers
tend to use
different techniques than c++ will.  Learning more programming
languages
in a sense is kind of like learning another language, with less
enlightenment; it changes how you think about, approach and solve
programming solutions.  Maybe some Java techniques may not work
in c++,
but you learn a bit with each language that you can apply across
the board.

On a side note; I would like to learn how to work with those data
structures; I haven't hit the class, but I've been keeping an eye
out
for a good book that will help out.  A lot of the info I've found
so far
uses a lot of pictures, which makes things a bit dificult.
On 3/9/2011 10:06 PM, Joseph Lee wrote:
 Hi,
 The point was learning to implement data structs using two or
more
 different languages (my apologies if it sounded different).
 I thought I heard you saying you wanted to learn hash tables.
 Basically, my instructor told me to shift six bits to the left
(from
 32) to create mapping for possible ASCII characters.

 ----- Original Message -----
 From: "Littlefield, Tyler" <tyler@xxxxxxxxxxxxx
 To: programmingblind@xxxxxxxxxxxxx
 Date sent: Wed, 09 Mar 2011 21:40:38 -0700
 Subject: Re: Bjarne Stroustrup talks about c++ and upcoming
features
 in thelanguage

 I'm kind of confused what this has to do with anything, though
it is
 late, my  head hurts and I've got a lot to get through.  What
does your
 bit manipulation hash have to do with it? Why do I get
referenced there?
 More to the point, what does your point say? Sina basically said
 programing languages are just a jumble of text, and it doesn't
matter
 whether or not you know it, as long as you know trees and graphs
and all
 the shiny data structures.  You're saying that it's good to know
two
 different languages (which again invalidates his point), and you
had a
 bit in there about where c++ was used, which doesn't click with
his c++
 is 10 years to late and useless because we have high-level
languages now.
 On 3/9/2011 5:08 PM, Joseph Lee wrote:
 Hi,
 I agree with Sina on this point.  The thing is, languages are
created
 to either solve a specific problem or to be used on specific
devices
 or OS platform.  C++ is still a language of choice for some
 developers, but there are others out there which simplifies
 development effort at the cost of not knowing the insides of
what's
 happening at the machine level.
 Personally, I'd prefer learning the equivalent syntax of two or
more
 languages and how they differ before diving into advanced
concepts
 like trees and tables (and yes, Tyler, I learned how to write
hash
 function with bit manipulation).  But, as I can say from
experience,
 it is better to understand what's going on rather than the word
 description of what you are doing - for instance, you don't want
to
 mess around with graph creation unless if you know how edges are
 represented (I prefer lists since they are easy to use than
matrices,
 but matrix makes more sense from graphics point of view).
 That's all - JMO.
 Cheers,
 Joseph

 ----- Original Message -----
 From: "Sina Bahram" <sbahram@xxxxxxxxx
 To: <programmingblind@xxxxxxxxxxxxx
 Date sent: Wed, 9 Mar 2011 18:54:49 -0500
 Subject: RE: Bjarne Stroustrup talks about c++ and upcoming
features
 in the language

 Man, am I glad medicine sure doesn't work that way.

 But hey, *smile*, I'm sure doctors would love to not learn
anything
 new, *grin*.

 This is my personal advice, so take it or leave it.

 Every single language specific thing you learn is worth nothing
more
 than the fleeting bits used to represent the ascii characters
 explaining it to you.  It is nothing more than syntactic garbage
 taking up space in your head..  this has been true for the past
60 to
 70 years, and it will be true for the next 70 years.

 That's why you should concentrate on learning concepts.  Who
cares if
 you can write a binary tree in C++, if you can't also write it,
 after only glancing at a reference manual for 10 minutes, in 25
other
 languages.

 languages come and go, but concepts hardly change.

 So, you can either focus and obsess on the 2011 specific stuff,
or the
 stuff that has been true ever since Charles Babbage made his
 difference engine over a century ago.

 And for you ladies out there, yes I'm aware that Ada Lovelace
actually
 did all the hard work, *grin*.

 Take care,
 Sina






 Take care,
 Sina


 -----Original Message-----
 From: programmingblind-bounce@xxxxxxxxxxxxx
 [mailto:programmingblind-bounce@xxxxxxxxxxxxx] On Behalf Of Alex
Midence
 Sent: Wednesday, March 09, 2011 6:48 PM
 To: programmingblind@xxxxxxxxxxxxx
 Subject: Re: Bjarne Stroustrup talks about c++ and upcoming
features
 in the language

 Well, I'm glad the language has held still over the years.  I'm
stil a
 novice in this language and I'm glad I don't have to be so
worried
 about my book or tutorial containing obselete code as I would be
for
 Java.  You can still take a c++ book written in 2004 or 2005 or
 something like that and use it to learn with.  Unless I'm
mistaken,
 you can't do this with c# or Java.  I tried looking at Java a
few
 months back and kept finding all these books that seemed to have
a
 bunch of things you had to change with subsequent versions of
Java.
 So, I for one am glad too much change hasn't come too quickly to
it.

 Alex M

 On 3/9/11, Sina Bahram <sbahram@xxxxxxxxx> wrote:
 Fine, seriously belated, delayed, and not as useful as it would
have
 been 10
 years ago.

 Take car,e
 Sina


 -----Original Message-----
 From: programmingblind-bounce@xxxxxxxxxxxxx
 [mailto:programmingblind-bounce@xxxxxxxxxxxxx] On Behalf Of
Littlefield,
 Tyler
 Sent: Wednesday, March 09, 2011 6:39 PM
 To: programmingblind@xxxxxxxxxxxxx
 Subject: Re: Bjarne Stroustrup talks about c++ and upcoming
features
 in the
 language

 But it wasn't.  This is a long time in coming, but it doesn't
make it
 useless.
 On 3/9/2011 3:41 PM, Sina Bahram wrote:
 Wow, how many decades has it been?

 Oh well, better later than never, or something, I'm sure.

 Sorry, this is kind of useless.

 This should have been done in 1999.

 Take care,
 Sina

 -----Original Message-----
 From: programmingblind-bounce@xxxxxxxxxxxxx
 [mailto:programmingblind-bounce@xxxxxxxxxxxxx] On Behalf Of Alex
Midence
 Sent: Wednesday, March 09, 2011 5:17 PM
 To: programmingblind
 Subject: Bjarne Stroustrup talks about c++ and upcoming features
in the
 language

 http://csclub.uwaterloo.ca/media/C++0x%20-%20An%20Overview.html

 Fascinating video from the man himself.  Interesting to hear his
 voice.  For those who don't know, Bjarne Stroustrup is the man
who
 invented c++.  The language was originally called c with classes
but
 then, he changed the name to c++ because in c, the ++ means
 incremental addition.

 Enjoy,

 Alex M
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 Thanks,
 Ty

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 Ty

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Thanks,
Ty

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