Re: Best Java Guides for a Newby?

That is what I would like to do, but I can't get javac to work on my machine  
no matter what I do, so I'm really not sure if I'm able to use a text editor?
Also the "Run" client on Windows doesn't allow me to read the output window.
I have no idea now to fix either of these problems, and these weren't 
troubleshot in the manual.
Is Netbeans accessible?
Thanks,

Brandon Keith Biggs

Check out
MySpace: http://www.myspace.com/brandonkeithbiggs
Also add me on facebook! 
brandonkeith
http://www.facebook.com/profile.php?id=675097942
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From: Homme, James 
Sent: Thursday, July 07, 2011 3:48 AM
To: programmingblind@xxxxxxxxxxxxx 
Subject: RE: Best Java Guides for a Newby?


Hi Brandon,

This is my opinion, so take with a grain of salt. Right at the beginning with 
Java, I feel that you should use a text editor. Personally, I prefer EdSharp, 
but there  are lots of good ones. Learn to use the command line tools that come 
with the Java Development Kit. After you have written some programs, and you 
know what's going on with basic Java, start to use something like Eclipse or 
Net Beans. I have no experience with SodBeans, but I understand that that 
package for NetBeans is making a big difference in NetBeans accessibility. So 
scrap fancy editors for now.

 

Jim

 

From: programmingblind-bounce@xxxxxxxxxxxxx 
[mailto:programmingblind-bounce@xxxxxxxxxxxxx] On Behalf Of Brandon Keith 
(Biggs)
Sent: Thursday, July 07, 2011 12:17 AM
To: programmingblind@xxxxxxxxxxxxx
Subject: Re: Best Java Guides for a Newby?

 

Thanks and I started reading those, the only problem is I use Eclipse and these 
talk about the Netbeans IDE which I think it is inaccessible. 

My big question is: What are all the differences in the different things you 
can create with the new menu in Eclipse? There are like projects, classes, Java 
projects and all kinds of other things that aren't really talked about with 
Java.

Thanks,

 

Brandon Keith Biggs

 

Check out
MySpace: http://www.myspace.com/brandonkeithbiggs
Also add me on facebook! 
brandonkeith
http://www.facebook.com/profile.php?id=675097942
And for my resume go to: 
http://www.sfcasting.com/brandonkeith 

 

From: Homme, James 

Sent: Wednesday, July 06, 2011 9:36 AM

To: programmingblind@xxxxxxxxxxxxx 

Subject: RE: Best Java Guides for a Newby?

 

Hi,

I think that, as with many things, this is one of those things that can be 
different, depending on the learning style and knowledge of the person. 

 

Speaking just for myself, I get more out of tutorial style books, when I'm 
learning a language. I tend to freeze up at reference type material that is 
full of code and short on words, but that's my taste. 

 

According to me, you will probably do well with the nutshell books, if you 
already know lots of programming concepts and want to see how certain things 
are done in Java. On the other hand, you may do better if you have little 
programming experience by looking at the Java Tutorial, which takes things a 
concept at a time and explains them with lots of words and examples. You can 
see that at http://download.oracle.com/javase/tutorial/reallybigindex.html. 

 

Thanks.

 

Jim 

 

From: programmingblind-bounce@xxxxxxxxxxxxx 
[mailto:programmingblind-bounce@xxxxxxxxxxxxx] On Behalf Of qubit
Sent: Wednesday, July 06, 2011 12:30 PM
To: programmingblind@xxxxxxxxxxxxx
Subject: Re: Best Java Guides for a Newby?

 

I would recommend if you have a subscription to bookshare.org, that you 
download a copy of "Java in a Nutshell".  It is a nice summary of features with 
some examples.  I was going to read "Thinking in Java, 4th edition", which I 
forked $25 for online, but got a package that I cann't display on my system.  I 
have been unable to read more than the preface, and most the time, the html 
just freezes things.  So I'm pitching it.  A shame as it sounds like a useful 
guide to using java the way it is meant to be used.

 

Online there are also common tasks implemented in java, which you can find in 
http://commons.apache.org/

Good luck and happy hacking.

--le

 

  ----- Original Message ----- 

  From: Florian Beijers 

  To: programmingblind@xxxxxxxxxxxxx 

  Sent: Wednesday, July 06, 2011 6:44 AM

  Subject: Re: Best Java Guides for a Newby?

   

  Hello Brandon, 

   

  Do you have any form of IM or perhaps skype? I would like to help you but 
it's easier for me to recommend something if i know a bit more about your 
background. 

   

  Florian

  On Jul 6, 2011, at 8:04 AM, Brandon Keith (Biggs) wrote:

   

  Hello,

  I'm new to programming, (I have just made it past "Hello World") and am 
looking for some guides.

  I would like to learn Java, but I'm not quite sure where to start. I 
downloaded the 500 or so documents from the "Java Documentation" at:

  http://www.nonvisualdevelopment.org/node/20

  as well as reading all the tutorials on Eclipse and Java.

  I've installed the SDK 1.6 and Eclipse, is there anything else I need? I see 
there are Jaws scripts for Eclipse, where do I insert those?

  I arrowed through the 500 documents dealing with Java and found:

  Java Tutorial 3rd Edition, a short course on the basics

  but I see it was written in 2001 and only deals with Java 1.3 and Windows 
2000 and before. Is this something I should read? What books best describe the 
language in an exciting and useful format? I'm wanting to eventually program 
for Android, but I think that is stepping a little ahead of myself.

  Where do I start?

  Thanks,

   

  Brandon Keith Biggs

   

  Check out
  MySpace: http://www.myspace.com/brandonkeithbiggs
  Also add me on facebook! 
  brandonkeith
  http://www.facebook.com/profile.php?id=675097942
  And for my resume go to: 
  http://www.sfcasting.com/brandonkeith 

   

 


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