RE: Best Java Guides for a Newby?

One minor correction, java is not a fully object oriented language. It's 
practicle in that there are still primatives like int,
float, and so on. They do have object counterparts though.

 

But yes, compared to Python and the rest, it's more object oriented than 
anything those guys have to offer.

 

Take care,

Sina

 

From: programmingblind-bounce@xxxxxxxxxxxxx 
[mailto:programmingblind-bounce@xxxxxxxxxxxxx] On Behalf Of Ken Perry
Sent: Thursday, July 07, 2011 8:05 AM
To: programmingblind@xxxxxxxxxxxxx
Subject: RE: Best Java Guides for a Newby?

 

Well the problem with Java is that it is a full object oriented language.  This 
means before writing one bit of code you need to
know three things.  

 

1)      How to import stuff

2)      2) what is an object

3)      What are methods.

 

Without those three things you cannot do anything in java.  That is why python 
and other interpreted languages are easier to learn.
You don't even need to know what a function is to make something happen in 
python or perl or languages of the type.  

 

So I guess if I was writing a tutorial I would have to really clearly describe 
the above before anyone could go on.  Now with that
said once you learn those three things Eclipse gets you going quick.  If  a 
person doesn't understand methods (functions in java) it
doesn't matter if they are using eclipse or notepad they are so screwed.

 

Ken

 

From: programmingblind-bounce@xxxxxxxxxxxxx 
[mailto:programmingblind-bounce@xxxxxxxxxxxxx] On Behalf Of Homme, James
Sent: Thursday, July 07, 2011 7:22 AM
To: programmingblind@xxxxxxxxxxxxx
Subject: RE: Best Java Guides for a Newby?

 

Hi Ken,

I will definitely pop Eclipse open and take another look at the help features. 
Perhaps my frustration level goes up faster than
some. The only thing I might argue with you about is that perhaps someone might 
start with Eclipse, and not even know what a
function is. My goal was to reduce the learning curve so that the only thing 
being learned is the language. 

 

Thanks.

 

Jim

 

From: programmingblind-bounce@xxxxxxxxxxxxx 
[mailto:programmingblind-bounce@xxxxxxxxxxxxx] On Behalf Of Ken Perry
Sent: Thursday, July 07, 2011 7:17 AM
To: programmingblind@xxxxxxxxxxxxx
Subject: RE: Best Java Guides for a Newby?

 

I have to disagree with this.  There is nothing like using eclipse when you're 
learning a language.  Let's say you are in Android
and need to make an Application.  Ok so you start it up and there is an 
Activity class.  You're in your text editor what do you do?

 

You go out on line or into a document and try to read up on all the possible 
functions you can run in an activity.   Not bad but why
not make it quicker.

 

Just arrow to your myactivity and use the source menu and go down and select 
override members.  Then you can arrow through the list
of things you have that you can do in that class.  You check a few and tab down 
and hit ok.  Now you have 6 stub functions that work
perfect.  You then go down to the keydown function that you just added  and 
arrow over keyEvent and select help it tells you all the
functions  

 

Eclipse and Visual studio are  not just environments but they are  great 
learning tools.  Not to mention learning the environment
now with an easy program will  speed up both development of a harder program 
but it also teaches you how to download other peoples
projects and get them running.  

 

Heck for that matter if you don't use eclipse you have to learn another way to 
compile your project.  Which normally means you start
compiling at the command line with javac.  That sounds easy but how many of you 
have tried this and ran into the java path problems.
That is not something you want to get a new user into right away.  Then if you 
want to get real bold and use ant as a new programmer
you better have a lot of antacid.

 

So I guess in short I just wanted to say sure Eclipse is a big pig but the 
gains for a new coder is pretty high if you learn to use
it.  Now if you're on a Mac sorry to hear it while I like Mac I have not been 
impressed with the amount of work I had to go through
to get Eclipse set up.  I use it on both Mac and Windows but I will tell you 
there is nothing like Eclipse and Jaws 12.  I use no
scripts and do just fine.

 

Ken

 

From: programmingblind-bounce@xxxxxxxxxxxxx 
[mailto:programmingblind-bounce@xxxxxxxxxxxxx] On Behalf Of Homme, James
Sent: Thursday, July 07, 2011 6:49 AM
To: programmingblind@xxxxxxxxxxxxx
Subject: RE: Best Java Guides for a Newby?

 

Hi Brandon,

This is my opinion, so take with a grain of salt. Right at the beginning with 
Java, I feel that you should use a text editor.
Personally, I prefer EdSharp, but there  are lots of good ones. Learn to use 
the command line tools that come with the Java
Development Kit. After you have written some programs, and you know what's 
going on with basic Java, start to use something like
Eclipse or Net Beans. I have no experience with SodBeans, but I understand that 
that package for NetBeans is making a big difference
in NetBeans accessibility. So scrap fancy editors for now.

 

Jim

 

From: programmingblind-bounce@xxxxxxxxxxxxx 
[mailto:programmingblind-bounce@xxxxxxxxxxxxx] On Behalf Of Brandon Keith 
(Biggs)
Sent: Thursday, July 07, 2011 12:17 AM
To: programmingblind@xxxxxxxxxxxxx
Subject: Re: Best Java Guides for a Newby?

 

Thanks and I started reading those, the only problem is I use Eclipse and these 
talk about the Netbeans IDE which I think it is
inaccessible. 

My big question is: What are all the differences in the different things you 
can create with the new menu in Eclipse? There are like
projects, classes, Java projects and all kinds of other things that aren't 
really talked about with Java.

Thanks,

 

Brandon Keith Biggs

 

Check out
MySpace: http://www.myspace.com/brandonkeithbiggs
Also add me on facebook! 
brandonkeith
http://www.facebook.com/profile.php?id=675097942
And for my resume go to: 
http://www.sfcasting.com/brandonkeith 

 

From: Homme, James <mailto:james.homme@xxxxxxxxxxxx>  

Sent: Wednesday, July 06, 2011 9:36 AM

To: programmingblind@xxxxxxxxxxxxx 

Subject: RE: Best Java Guides for a Newby?

 

Hi,

I think that, as with many things, this is one of those things that can be 
different, depending on the learning style and knowledge
of the person. 

 

Speaking just for myself, I get more out of tutorial style books, when I'm 
learning a language. I tend to freeze up at reference
type material that is full of code and short on words, but that's my taste. 

 

According to me, you will probably do well with the nutshell books, if you 
already know lots of programming concepts and want to see
how certain things are done in Java. On the other hand, you may do better if 
you have little programming experience by looking at
the Java Tutorial, which takes things a concept at a time and explains them 
with lots of words and examples. You can see that at
http://download.oracle.com/javase/tutorial/reallybigindex.html. 

 

Thanks.

 

Jim 

 

From: programmingblind-bounce@xxxxxxxxxxxxx 
[mailto:programmingblind-bounce@xxxxxxxxxxxxx] On Behalf Of qubit
Sent: Wednesday, July 06, 2011 12:30 PM
To: programmingblind@xxxxxxxxxxxxx
Subject: Re: Best Java Guides for a Newby?

 

I would recommend if you have a subscription to bookshare.org, that you 
download a copy of "Java in a Nutshell".  It is a nice
summary of features with some examples.  I was going to read "Thinking in Java, 
4th edition", which I forked $25 for online, but got
a package that I cann't display on my system.  I have been unable to read more 
than the preface, and most the time, the html just
freezes things.  So I'm pitching it.  A shame as it sounds like a useful guide 
to using java the way it is meant to be used.

 

Online there are also common tasks implemented in java, which you can find in 
http://commons.apache.org/

Good luck and happy hacking.

--le

 

----- Original Message ----- 

From: Florian Beijers <mailto:florianbeijers@xxxxxxxxx>  

To: programmingblind@xxxxxxxxxxxxx 

Sent: Wednesday, July 06, 2011 6:44 AM

Subject: Re: Best Java Guides for a Newby?

 

Hello Brandon, 

 

Do you have any form of IM or perhaps skype? I would like to help you but it's 
easier for me to recommend something if i know a bit
more about your background. 

 

Florian

On Jul 6, 2011, at 8:04 AM, Brandon Keith (Biggs) wrote:

 

Hello,

I'm new to programming, (I have just made it past "Hello World") and am looking 
for some guides.

I would like to learn Java, but I'm not quite sure where to start. I downloaded 
the 500 or so documents from the "Java
Documentation" at:

http://www.nonvisualdevelopment.org/node/20

as well as reading all the tutorials on Eclipse and Java.

I've installed the SDK 1.6 and Eclipse, is there anything else I need? I see 
there are Jaws scripts for Eclipse, where do I insert
those?

I arrowed through the 500 documents dealing with Java and found:

Java Tutorial 3rd Edition, a short course on the basics

but I see it was written in 2001 and only deals with Java 1.3 and Windows 2000 
and before. Is this something I should read? What
books best describe the language in an exciting and useful format? I'm wanting 
to eventually program for Android, but I think that
is stepping a little ahead of myself.

Where do I start?

Thanks,

 

Brandon Keith Biggs

 

Check out
MySpace: http://www.myspace.com/brandonkeithbiggs
Also add me on facebook! 
brandonkeith
http://www.facebook.com/profile.php?id=675097942
And for my resume go to: 
http://www.sfcasting.com/brandonkeith 

 

 

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