RE: Any support/suggestions for a blind student...

Joseph,

That being the case, you're in like Flynn.  I think before anyone
attempts to replicate that R.N.I.B. study brain scans ought to be used
to ensure no additional disabilities fly under the radar and get
incorrectly lumped together and associated with the population of a
replication study that's never had memory of vision.  Maybe R.N.I.B. had
brain scans done, I just don't know for sure and would be lots more
comfortable with their results had those scans been done either to
screen additional disabilities out or take them into account within the
study.
 


Rot47: <;F56]52D9:6==@?2GJ]>:=>
-----Original Message-----
From: programmingblind-bounce@xxxxxxxxxxxxx
[mailto:programmingblind-bounce@xxxxxxxxxxxxx] On Behalf Of Joseph Lee
Sent: Tuesday, March 16, 2010 7:44
To: programmingblind@xxxxxxxxxxxxx
Subject: RE: Any support/suggestions for a blind student...

Hi Jude,
Yes, I do have vast memory of vision (I was a low vision kid 
before I got glacoma at age 14).  As for user interface, I can 
picture it in my head.
For now, those are not of my concern, but maybe for future 
classes (there is a class just for graphics development at my 
school, and one of the professors here is a researcher in this 
field).
If you permit me, I'm happy to share your email address (along 
with Black Aires) to my professors (especially the graphics 
researcher) so that you can assist them.  Thanks for your notes 
(I'll keep those in mind).
Cheers,
Joseph

 ----- Original Message -----
From: "DaShiell, Jude T.  CIV NAVAIR 1490, 1, 26" 
<jude.dashiell@xxxxxxxx
To: <programmingblind@xxxxxxxxxxxxx
Date sent: Tue, 16 Mar 2010 07:26:29 -0400
Subject: RE: Any support/suggestions for a blind student...

If memory serves one of the email lists I receive distributed a 
message
containing R.N.I.B.  summary study results from a study R.N.I.B.
published in 2009.  The study used 300 participants with all 
levels of
blindness.  The study's purpose was to discover to what extent 
blind
people could do graphical user interface software development.  
The
results shouldn't have been surprising either.  It was found that 
those
participants who had some memory of vision could do graphical 
user
interface programming; the longer the memory of vision, the 
easier it
was for them to do software development.  The participants that 
had no
memory of vision however had major difficulties with doing that 
kind of
programming.  In time this will impact windows and software 
development
platform interfaces that run on windows but that hasn't yet 
happened.  A
real good analogy to consider on the Linux side is a software 
package
called xenity.  What xenity does is to inhale a bash script and 
produce
a graphical user interface-friendly program equivalent that can 
be run
on gnome with a mouse click.  As I see it, Microsoft made two 
mistakes
with Windows which until they're corrected the best software for 
those
of us with no memory of vision to program for will be Linux in 
its
varied forms.  First, the command line interface was made into a 
very
poorly equipped environment for software development.  Second, if
someone does console-based development of software within Windows 
to my
knowledge to date no xenity equivalents yet exist for any 
supported
software development package now running on Windows; I would love 
to be
corrected on this point if at all possible even if packages under 
active
development are all that can be offered as suggestions.



Rot47: <;F56]52D9:6==@?2GJ]>:=
-----Original Message-----
From: programmingblind-bounce@xxxxxxxxxxxxx
[mailto:programmingblind-bounce@xxxxxxxxxxxxx] On Behalf Of 
Joseph Lee
Sent: Monday, March 15, 2010 17:11
To: programmingblind@xxxxxxxxxxxxx
Subject: Any support/suggestions for a blind student...

Hi veterans, programmers and students,
For those who does not know me, I am Joseph, a computer science
sophomore student at University of California, Riverside (UCR).
My main interests are all about assistive technology and computer
education, more specifically embedded devices, networking and so
forth.
One of my CS professors who teaches C++, asked me to ask you if
you have any suggestions/opinions for learning graphics and
general mathematics, which I know is important for engineering.
I thought of using tactile arablets such as so-called "Talking
Tactile Tablet" or via PIAF (Picture In A Flash).  Since I'm the
first blind CS student at UCR, the engineering professors there
are interested in how a blind student can learn programming and
graphics.  I told the professors there about this list and how
there are blind programmers (like you guys) who writes GUI apps.
So, in summary, I'm wondering if there is a programmer here who
can work with me to come up with a solution - allowing me to
learn programming effectively from a blindness perspective.  If
you permit me, I'm willing to pass on your contact information to
the UCR CS faculty so that they can contact you for assistance
(especially when it comes to learning graphical information such
as math, hardware organization chart and so forth).  Thanks for
any assistance on this matter.
Sincerely,
Joseph S.  Lee
University of California, Riverside
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