[program-java] Re: Java: Precedence

Hi:

I meant slapped down in a funny way.... More like the way Moe hits Curly.

Can't post code because of the rules governing such. That's why I try to write 
little snippets.

Jim

-----Original Message-----
From: program-java-bounce@xxxxxxxxxxxxx 
[mailto:program-java-bounce@xxxxxxxxxxxxx] On Behalf Of Sina Bahram
Sent: September 7, 2010 16:15
To: program-java@xxxxxxxxxxxxx
Subject: [program-java] Re: Java: Precedence

Jim,

My appologies, no slap down intended. Sorry, was probably far too Socratic in 
my response.

Care to post the whole code?

Take care,
Sina

-----Original Message-----
From: program-java-bounce@xxxxxxxxxxxxx 
[mailto:program-java-bounce@xxxxxxxxxxxxx] On Behalf Of Corbett, James
Sent: Tuesday, September 07, 2010 3:53 PM
To: 'program-java@xxxxxxxxxxxxx'
Subject: [program-java] Re: Java: Precedence

Hi:

Obviously zero. ...Ok, the reason I ask was because in this piece of code that 
I've inherited x for lack of a better name is used in at least 30 places in the 
class and the class level x is declared as transient. I'm trying to figure this 
mess out and thought I would ask the initial question with out the slap down.

Jim

-----Original Message-----
From: program-java-bounce@xxxxxxxxxxxxx 
[mailto:program-java-bounce@xxxxxxxxxxxxx] On Behalf Of Sina Bahram
Sent: September 7, 2010 15:19
To: program-java@xxxxxxxxxxxxx
Subject: [program-java] Re: Java: Precedence

Jim,

You should be able to answer this question yourself based on first principles.

Let's examine what you have.

You have a method, and in there you declare a variable named x. absolutely 
nothing else matters, even a million other definitions of x in a million other 
scopes, because the next line returns x, and the x in the immediate scope is 
the variable you just defined; thus, 11 is returned.

Also, don't do x=0 when defining your variable. if you want to assign a value 
to x, then do it in your constructor. Furthermore, x is an int, which means it 
defaults to 0.

What if we change that line to "return this.x;"? Can you tell me what value is 
returned?

Take care,
Sina

________________________________

From: program-java-bounce@xxxxxxxxxxxxx 
[mailto:program-java-bounce@xxxxxxxxxxxxx] On Behalf Of Corbett, James
Sent: Tuesday, September 07, 2010 2:21 PM
To: 'program-java@xxxxxxxxxxxxx'
Subject: [program-java] Java: Precedence


Hello all:

I know y'all say don't do that but let's just pretend.

If a member is declared private to the class such as

Public Class MYClass {

Private int x = 0;

Public MYClass() {

}

Public int getX () {
        int x = 11;
        return x;
}

}

What would you expect to have returned as a value of .getX()?

Jim


James M. Corbett

Programmer / Analyst |
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