RE: How do you think about Oracle's EC2/S3?

There is a difference between trusting encryption to a private dropbox and
trusting high availability and ongoing 24 by 7 security to a cloud. For the
former, you are not discharging the only copy you have to the ether and
hoping, and you can limit the duration of exposure of the encrypted files.
For the latter you should not be discharging the only copy you have to the
ether (but many do), and of course highly available systems are also highly
available to be attacked.

Now did I write that you should trust either? Read carefully. Without
knowing exactly what you are trusting to a dropbox or what information you
plan to trust to a cloud implementation that would be imprudent.
But there is definitely a lower threshold for trusting a dropbox than for
trusting a cloud with objects of the same value. One is transient, the other
is sustained.

Regards,

mwf

-----Original Message-----
From: oracle-l-bounce@xxxxxxxxxxxxx [mailto:oracle-l-bounce@xxxxxxxxxxxxx]
On Behalf Of Leyi Zhang (Kamus)
Sent: Friday, May 06, 2011 11:44 AM
To: Goulet, Richard
Cc: oracle_l
Subject: Re: How do you think about Oracle's EC2/S3?

Yes, I always know there is risk for data if we put them in the cloud, but
this is the issue we keep on challenging the CLOUD these years, and I
believe the cloud provider is trying hardly to dispel our concerns about
this.

If we can't trust cloud provider, eg Amazon S3, how can we trust that we can
safely put the private docs in dropbox?

--
Kamus <kamusis@xxxxxxxxx>

Visit my blog for more : http://www.dbform.com Join ACOUG:
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On Fri, May 6, 2011 at 8:15 PM, Goulet, Richard <Richard.Goulet@xxxxxxxxxxx>
wrote:
> Leyi,
>
>        Call me old fashioned if you want, but having worked in an 
> outsource shop I think doing something like this for anyone puts their 
> data at risk.  Outsource or cloud provider shops are not the most 
> stable in terms of employee turnover and they have no idea of what is 
> going out the door with each employee, nor do they appear to care.  
> Add to that the decrease in cost for x86 Intel platforms and Linux and 
> a entry level shop would do well to have their own equipment with 
> Oracle SE One or Standard edition if they wanted.  They might, though, 
> find it more cost effective to just install a Linux server with 
> PostgreSql and call it done.  No long term commitments that are or 
> could become overly expensive.
>
>
> Dick Goulet
> Senior Oracle DBA/NA Team Leader
>
>
> -----Original Message-----
> From: oracle-l-bounce@xxxxxxxxxxxxx
> [mailto:oracle-l-bounce@xxxxxxxxxxxxx] On Behalf Of Leyi Zhang (Kamus)
> Sent: Friday, May 06, 2011 6:14 AM
> To: oracle_l
> Subject: How do you think about Oracle's EC2/S3?
>
> Hi lists
>
> I'm personally using Amazon EC2/S3 for testing, and I know Dropbox is 
> totally depend on Amazon S3, and Quora also use EC2 and S3 heavily.
>
> So what do you guys think if Oracle can release a product/service 
> based on their Elastic Cloud Platform (for example Exalogic+Exadata) ?
> If using this service, we customer will not need to pay for software 
> license anymore, just like how we using Amazon EC2/S3, we only need to 
> pay for the CPU/Mem/Storage we actually used.
> Do you guys think this is an win-win idea for the Entry level/Midrange 
> enterprise customer and Oracle?
>
> --
> Kamus <kamusis@xxxxxxxxx>
>
> Visit my blog for more : http://www.dbform.com Join ACOUG: 
> http://www.acoug.org
> --
> http://www.freelists.org/webpage/oracle-l
>
>
>
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