Re: Hi,

the enterprise service bus has a database adapter.  you point it at a table, 
and tell it to poll for changes to that table.  you configure another adapter 
to insert that record into another database via another database adaptor.
   
  I don't have to code the scheduling mechanism, the insert...select..., the 
transformation between record structures from source to target, etc.  I 
configure stuff.  semantics maybe.
   
  some would say middleware adds complexity (now we have middleware involved).  
many places already use middleware, and are comfortable with it, so using it to 
solve this problem is a no-brainer for them.  you configure through a wizard 
two adapters, one for the source, the other at the target, and than the polling 
begins.. when a new record is found, it is pushed to the target.
   
  the polling (other than the interval) is a black box to the developer, the 
insert/transformation is also a black box of sorts.
   
  oracle posts an example here:
  
http://download.oracle.com/docs/cd/B31017_01/integrate.1013/b28212/usingendtoend.htm#CIHBBCGB
   
  
this example though is a file to a database using the file adapter (at the 
source), and a db adapter at the target.  for this example, dbas would write 
SQL*Loader or external table insert..select, they would write a file system 
polling mechanism, and they would call their script whenever the file showed 
up.  there is nothing wrong with that.  this is another approach that is less 
coding than that IMHO.  In this SQL Server to Oracle scenario, instead of file 
adaptor to db adaptor, you would have db adaptor to db adaptor.
   
  I shouldn't comment on the relative ease of development.  It depends on the 
skill set of the team.  but if you need real time integration, and don't want 
to code the polling mechanism, and the insert, use middleware adapters that 
already have this logic in place for simple gui configuration.
   
  just another approach to integration that fits certain use cases.  not bulk 
data movement really in my opinion, but folks use middleware to move thousands 
of messages a second from system to system, where a pure DBA would only 
consider db links/replication technology.
   
  just another opinion on an approach that may be applicable.  isn't real-time 
integration the thing now?  (Streams, SOA, EDA, etc.)
   
  Job
  
Alexander Fatkulin <afatkulin@xxxxxxxxx> wrote:
  Job,

> With the development tools in the middleware space, I can do this
> integration quite quickly from SQL Server to Oracle without requiring any
> DBA intervention and without coding.

Setting up TG is not a rocket since also... What coding do you mean?

> For real-time integration, this may be the ideal approach, instead of
> coding/scheduling the insert...select * from table where timestamp >
> last_time_i_checked.

Checking the timestamps is not the only approach. I don't see how any
middleware can make this easier (besides adding another layer of
complexity)?

On 7/16/07, Job Miller wrote:
> The ODBC Generic Gateway is free with the database. The Transparent Gateway
> for SQL Server is an add on option to the database that you may or may not
> need, depending on whether you can benefit from the capabilities the
> transparent gateway for SQL server provides.
>
> Dare I suggest middleware approaches to db-to-db integration on a dba
> mailing list?
> With the development tools in the middleware space, I can do this
> integration quite quickly from SQL Server to Oracle without requiring any
> DBA intervention and without coding.
>
> For real-time integration, this may be the ideal approach, instead of
> coding/scheduling the insert...select * from table where timestamp >
> last_time_i_checked.
>
> For bulk transfer/ETL, it may not be, but for consistent incremental
> changes, it may be.
>
> Job
>
>
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-- 
Alex Fatkulin,
The Pythian Group,
http://www.pythian.com/blogs/author/alexf/


       
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