[opendtv] Re: Highfield unveils vision for Freeview's future

Makes no sense? I've also proposed just recording everything of some selected set of channels. And Bob's proposal was only for 2 full streams. At 8.6 GB / hour you could record about 29 hours of 2 full streams on a 500GB drive. And I ordered one of those myself yesterday for $140.93, including shipping.


If you wanted only what Bob proposed you could get your whole week 24/7 for less than $900. Though since 99% of TV is useless to me I prefer to use the online guides and program my computers to only get the things of interest to me, just like I would not try to download the entire Internet. But storage cost is indeed trending towards free. It's just our usage and expectations trend upwards along with that.

- Tom



John Willkie wrote:
Record everthing?  Next to nothing?

Let me see, an ATSC transport stream is 8.7 gb per hout.  So, if you have 10
transport streams, recording everything uses up 87 gb of disk space in an
hour.

Why, that's only 2 terabytes a day for the ota DTV channels I can receive
over the air.  Then, add in a few hundred cable and satellite channels, and
I'm sure it won't be any more than 30 terabytes a day.  And, if you are away
from home for a day and couldn't watch all that content, you'd only need to
double your storage.  When one thinks of such large data bases, one
generally tends to think of redundancy and RAID arrays.

I just shopped for a new 400 gb hard drive, bob.  It only costs $139.  So,
to record a whole week OF EVERTHING would only cost me $24,325.  I just
can't wait until hard drives are 1/10th current price, and that will only
cost $2,432.

In other words, your concept MAKES NO SENSE, bob.

Of course, if you were to remove duplicated programming, eliminate
commercials, and prioritize based on what you've watched before and your
expressed interests, that might fit into a Tivo-like box.  But, that
wouldn't be recording everything.

Here's also something to keep in mind: the target.  People only live 8,760
or so hours per year, and about 1/3 of that is taken up by sleeping, and
perhaps 1/4 by working.  That means 7/12th of the time, people can't watch
TV.

I suspect that people can't watch 'much more' than 2 tv programs
simultaneously.  That means there is about 5,110 hours per year that the
average person COULD watch TV, without counting driving time, family time,
etc.  So, your system would store in a day about the number of hours of
television programming that a person could watch in a year.

This is absurd, Bob.  But, the economics will only improve, as disk drives
get cheaper.  That said, ti will be absurd for many, many years.  Might work
in an area where there is only one channel.

John Willkie

P.S.  That's the trick!  Store everything to HD-DVR or Blue-Ray!  It would
only take about a dozen or more drives continually recording, and those
disks are so cheap!



----- Original Message ----- From: "Bob Miller" <robmxa@xxxxxxxxx>
To: <opendtv@xxxxxxxxxxxxx>
Sent: Thursday, April 19, 2007 8:47 AM
Subject: [opendtv] Re: Highfield unveils vision for Freeview's future



We were promoting this idea in 2000. Record everything in fact. The
premise was that storage devices would cost close to zero by now. The
viewer would chose what they did not want to see recorded. Our "Hockey
Puck" receiver was designed to record all new content being broadcast
from 12 virtual channels delivered over two 6 MHz channels.

Bob Miller

On 4/19/07, Manfredi, Albert E <albert.e.manfredi@xxxxxxxxxx> wrote:

This vision of Freeview future includes a PVR/Internet TV hybrid STB,
for catch-up video on demand. Should be readily doable.

Bert

-----------------------------------------------------------
http://www.dtg.org.uk/news/news.php?class=countries&subclass=0&id=2376

Highfield unveils vision for Freeview's future

BBC future media and technology director Ashley Highfield says it is
"critical that Freeview evolves as a compelling and competitive
alternative to cable and satellite". That means free-to-air channels in
high definition-now the subject of a heated debate between public
services broadcasters and regulator Ofcom over future use of liberated
spectrum. But Highfield told a conference in Cannes that Freeview also
needed to offer on-demand content, "both a catch-up service, and access
to back-catalogue and archive programming".

In a wide-ranging speech Highfield also disclosed that the BBC was
working on an Apple Mac-compatible version of its web-based iPlayer
seven-day catch-up TV service, as well as launching a pilot opening up
the BBC's vast archive to web users.

"Getting our BBC iPlayer seven-day catch-up TV service and our archive
pilot out on to the web is one thing, but clearly the biggest available
audience is sat in front of the television. Like many others, we've been
busy building a bridge between our on-demand content aspirations and our
audiences' lounge-bound televisions," said Highfield.

"As Britain enters the endgame of analogue switchover, we have a
four-year-long opportunity to achieve a step-change in the services
which we deliver on Freeview, and to evolve and future-proof Freeview
with additional advanced interactive and digital functionality.

"We've just completed a technical trial to test some of the technologies
around, pushing 50 hours of BBC programming per week automatically to
digital video recorders on Freeview.

"It's a simple catch-up service that could become the entry-point for
audiences to on-demand for the first time. Its advantage over a PVR is
that you don't have to remember to record your favourite BBC programmes,
and that at any one moment, in addition to all the linear channels,
there is always a freshly-prepared up-to-date carousel of 50 hours of
on-demand programmes."

Highfield said while 'push-VOD' had its attractions it would not allow
"any viewer to access any BBC programme ever broadcast via their
television". That required an internet connection and new hybrid set-top
box, combining broadcast TV with the internet. "Hybrid boxes are a part
of the future, as important-if not more so-than standard PVRs," said
Highfield.

"In a hybrid environment you can really start to mix and match, using
the best of both worlds linear scheduled TV via digital broadcast for
new programming on the one hand, and deep archive via IP on the other.
Their worlds may be converging, but they're not in competition. The BBC
will deliver content and applications via broadcast and IP, merging them
into a seamless audience experience."

Lovelace Consulting 19.04.2007


----------------------------------------------------------------------
You can UNSUBSCRIBE from the OpenDTV list in two ways:

- Using the UNSUBSCRIBE command in your user configuration settings at

FreeLists.org

- By sending a message to: opendtv-request@xxxxxxxxxxxxx with the word

unsubscribe in the subject line.



----------------------------------------------------------------------
You can UNSUBSCRIBE from the OpenDTV list in two ways:

- Using the UNSUBSCRIBE command in your user configuration settings at

FreeLists.org

- By sending a message to: opendtv-request@xxxxxxxxxxxxx with the word

unsubscribe in the subject line.





































































































































































































----------------------------------------------------------------------
You can UNSUBSCRIBE from the OpenDTV list in two ways:

- Using the UNSUBSCRIBE command in your user configuration settings at FreeLists.org
- By sending a message to: opendtv-request@xxxxxxxxxxxxx with the word 
unsubscribe in the subject line.



--
Tom Barry                  trbarry@xxxxxxxxxxx  



----------------------------------------------------------------------
You can UNSUBSCRIBE from the OpenDTV list in two ways:

- Using the UNSUBSCRIBE command in your user configuration settings at FreeLists.org
- By sending a message to: opendtv-request@xxxxxxxxxxxxx with the word 
unsubscribe in the subject line.

Other related posts: