[nvda] Re: observations with the latest snapshot

Hi,

what about designing a sort of "keyboard manager" like in jaws? Then everyone could pick the keys they wanted.

HTH!
----- Original Message ----- From: "James Teh" <jamie@xxxxxxxxxxx>
To: <nvda@xxxxxxxxxxxxx>
Sent: Wednesday, June 04, 2008 10:38 PM
Subject: [nvda] Re: observations with the latest snapshot


Gene wrote:
Referring to synthesizer commands, Chris wrote in part:
This can be done
on the fly by nvda+control up arrow to increase, down arrow to
decrease, and left and right arrow to move in between the various
options such as voice, speed, etc.
This needs to be changed. There is no reasonable way to implement these
commands.
This is always very subjective. While I'm happy to consider changing keystrokes, there are reasons I'm not happy with these suggestions; see below.

Even if one uses the caps lock for the NVDA key the
combination of control caps lock is very uncomfortable and unnatural.
I actually have no trouble at all with control+capsLock, but having said this, I have a rather insane ability to manage all sorts of bizarre key combinations.

I would recommend assigning a combination
like alt shift for these kinds of commands and eliminating use of the
control key, leaving the simple alt plus shift plus arrow keys.
While you could argue that this is prioritising principles over convenience and useability, I think it is very important to try to use the NVDA key or the numpad (which is also associated with NVDA) for all screen reader functions. This makes it much easier for a user to understand which functions are implemented by the screen reader and which are implemented by the operating system and/or the application. There are cases where this is blurry (e.g. table navigation, which really should be part of the application/operating system itself but isn't), but changing speech parameters is definitely specific to the screen reader.

If the left control is
used, one is, once again, faced with the unpleasant task of holding the
numpad insert key with the right hand while simultaneously working with
the arrow keys with the same hand.
This is how I do this on a desktop keyboard and it doesn't seem to cause me any problems.

On my notebook (which is my primary machine), pressing these key combinations is actually a total nuisance. However, that's my fault for being strange and refusing to use an NVDA laptop keyboard layout. :)

Further feedback on this is certainly welcome. If we can come up with something that suits the majority of users better, that is great.

Jamie

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