Re: JAWS--good product--potential problem

This can be true, I find too that stopping speech does not necessarily lave
you where you think it is, generally Jaws is a few lines behind what is
being read. Sometimes I also go to line-by-line because it is faster
skipping over lengthy URLs as in reading down a list of Google results.

It should also be remembered though that sighted people have repetitive
strain syndrome from mousing, many of which functions could be more
effectively and physically more efficiently using keystroke alternatives. It
might well be that keyboard and Jaws users are, in fact healthier than mouse
users. There is a useful research project. Wonder if there is a government
grant in that? Now wouldn't that be something, just imagine the headlines.

"Blind persons more cost efficient to employ due to reduced work related
injury costs." In addition it is noted that they also result in reduced
photocopy costs, reduced electrical consumption and monitors last for ever!
<GRIN>

Dale Leavens, Cochrane Ontario
dleavens@xxxxxxx
     Home of the Polar Bear Express!
----- Original Message -----
From: "David Poehlman" <poehlman1@xxxxxxxxxxx>
To: <jfw@xxxxxxxxxxxxx>
Sent: Saturday, December 20, 2003 10:17 AM
Subject: Re: JAWS--good product--potential problem


Dale, While this is true, you must admit that it is cumbersom to use this
technique for navigation especially if you are doing research and on some
sistems, the forward and back during say all don't really work all that
well.

----- Original Message -----
From: "Dale Leavens" <dleavens@xxxxxxx>
To: <jfw@xxxxxxxxxxxxx>
Sent: Friday, December 19, 2003 10:57 PM
Subject: Re: JAWS--good product--potential problem


Well, there is the say-all sequence, it does not speak blank lines and does
not require a lot of repetitive use.

Dale Leavens, Cochrane Ontario
dleavens@xxxxxxx
     Home of the Polar Bear Express!
----- Original Message -----
From: "Tusing" <ptusing@xxxxxxxxxxxxx>
To: <jfw@xxxxxxxxxxxxx>
Sent: Friday, December 19, 2003 8:51 PM
Subject: JAWS--good product--potential problem


Greetings,
Although I do appreciate the effort behind and the great value of using
JAWS:
I  am  hearing from a growing--but  not scientific-polled group of  people
who
are reporting problems.
Their  issue which I do not wish to become my  issue  or  your issue is due
to stress or repeat motion strain on the hands due to the  increased number
of  keystrokes we get to  use as years  go by.
Being fair, we do  have Internet  keystrokes which work to a certain
extent:  however, the inability to "remove" totally blank  lines from the
web page reading experience has  such  people abandoning 5.
Very few people keyboard constantly as we screen reader users  do as our
software is keyboard driven and the  increased risk of carpel tunnel
syndrome is always there.
Why can't F S give us a toggle for "lessening" the  number of  totally blank
lines since the Internet keystrokes although O K--certainly are not 100%.
Why can't we "choose"   to turn  "off"   totally blank lines  on some  or
all web sites?
After all,  if JAWS can encounter text then one can surely program to locate
(and  hopefully) remove totally blank lines.
Repeat use damage can ruin a career.
Thank you.




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