[Ilugc] how to call it? :-) This might help u decide what to call it :D

  • From: schalla@xxxxxxxxxxxxxx (schalla)
  • Date: Mon, 07 Oct 2002 14:06:56 +0000

--------------060709090403090801050407
Content-Type: text/plain; charset=us-ascii; format=flowed
Content-Transfer-Encoding: 7bit

We cant call the GNU +  Linux as only Linux cause Linux contains only 
the kernel nothing else... other than the kernel all other components we 
find are of
GNU>>


An excerpt from the texts of RMS:

There really is a Linux, and these people are using it, but it is not 
the operating system. Linux is the kernel: the program in the system 
that allocates the machine's resources to the other programs that you 
run. The kernel is an essential part of an operating system, but useless 
by itself; it can only function in the context of a complete operating 
system. Linux is normally used in a combination with the GNU operating 
system: the whole system is basically GNU, with Linux functioning as its 
kernel.

Many users are not fully aware of the distinction between the kernel, 
which is Linux, and the whole system, which they also call ``Linux''. 
The ambiguous use of the name doesn't promote understanding. These users 
often think that Linus Torvalds developed the whole operating system in 
1991, with a bit of help.

Programmers generally know that Linux is a kernel. But since they have 
generally heard the whole system called ``Linux'' as well, they often 
envisage a history that would justify naming the whole system after the 
kernel. For example, many believe that once Linus Torvalds finished 
writing Linux, the kernel, its users looked around for other free 
software to go with it, and found that (for no particular reason) most 
everything necessary to make a Unix-like system was already available. 
What they found was no accident--it was the GNU system.

If we tried to measure the GNU Project's contribution in this way, what 
would we conclude? One CD-ROM vendor found that in their ``Linux 
distribution'', GHU Software was the largest single contingent, around 
28% of the total source code, and this included some of the essential 
major components without which there could be no system. Linux itself 
was about 3%. So if you were going to pick a name for the system based 
on who wrote the programs in the system, the most appropriate single 
choice would be ``GNU''.

The GNU Project's aim was to develop a complete free Unix-like system: GNU.

We use Linux-based GNU systems today for most of our work, and we hope 
you use them too. But please don't confuse the public by using the name 
``Linux'' ambiguously. Linux is the kernel, one of the essential major 
components of the system. The system as a whole is more or less the GNU 
system, with Linux added. When you're talking about this combination, 
please call it ``GNU/Linux''.


Shobhan Challa

Roopa K wrote:

hi,

thanx a lottttt for the replies...(for my posting "Linux CDs")

first i'd like to apologize for not calling GNU/Linux by its proper 
name - calling it as Linux is more of laziness than lack of 
acknowledgement of GNU's contribution. if everybody knows that Linux = 
GNU + Linux kernel, then we can stop calling it GNU/Linux.  we can 
call Linux kernel as Linux kernel and GNU softwares+Linux kernel as 
Linux; instead of asking everybody to call it GNU/Linux. But Stallman 
wudn't like it :-) but we clamor for freedom of thought... so i think 
we can 'freely' call it by any name :-)) .... please mail me your 
thoughts and opinions ....

yes, definitely, without GNU, Linux would have remained just an 
excellent student project.

one small thought on all this. (dunno if it is right.... plz don't 
bomb my mailbox....). Without the contributions of innumerable 
scientists who lived and died before Einstein, Einstein would have 
achieved nothing. He wud have been forced to discover everything from 
structure of atom to gravity to everything first, before he can even 
think about quantum physics or relativity or whatever. he wudn't even 
have had pen and paper to write his theory. but do we call it as:
"kepler/galileo/newton/jim/carry/.../mom/dad/bohr/einstein's theory of 
relativity"?

i didn't mean to be rude... hope you get the point though... plz tell 
me what u think.

i went home for a few days (coz of gandhi-jayanthi etc)... so i cudn't 
reply the mails that i got from the members of this group (the mails 
that i got directly). i'm sorry - i'll reply soon. thanx a lot to 
everybody....

regards,
roopa


------------------------------------------------------------------------
Do you Yahoo!?
New DSL Internet Access 
<http://rd.yahoo.com/evt=1207/*http://sbc.yahoo.com/> from SBC & Yahoo! 



--------------060709090403090801050407
Content-Type: text/html; charset=us-ascii
Content-Transfer-Encoding: 7bit

<!DOCTYPE html PUBLIC "-//W3C//DTD HTML 4.01 Transitional//EN">
<html>
<head>
  <title></title>
</head>
<body>
<font face="Helvetica, Arial, sans-serif" size="-1">We cant call the GNU
+ &nbsp;Linux as only Linux cause Linux contains only the kernel nothing else...
other than the kernel all other components we find are of <br>
GNU&gt;&gt;<br>
<br>
<br>
An excerpt from the texts of <b>RMS</b>:<br>
<br>
</font>
<p><font face="Helvetica, Arial, sans-serif" size="-1">  There really is
a Linux, and these people are using it, but it is not the operating system.
 Linux is the kernel: the program in the system that allocates the machine's
resources to the other programs that you run.  The kernel is an essential
part of an operating system, but useless by itself; it can only function
in the context of a complete operating system.  Linux is normally used in
a combination with the GNU operating system: the whole system is basically
GNU, with Linux functioning as its kernel.  </font></p>
<p><font face="Helvetica, Arial, sans-serif" size="-1">  Many users are not
fully aware of the distinction between the kernel, which is Linux, and the
whole system, which they also call ``Linux''. The ambiguous use of the name
doesn't promote understanding.  These users often think that Linus Torvalds
developed the whole operating system in 1991, with a bit of help.  </font></p>
<p><font face="Helvetica, Arial, sans-serif" size="-1"> Programmers generally
know that Linux is a kernel.  But since they have generally heard the whole
system called ``Linux'' as well, they often envisage a history that would
justify naming the whole system after the kernel.  For example, many believe
that once Linus Torvalds finished writing Linux, the kernel, its users looked
around for other free software to go with it, and found that (for no particular
reason) most everything necessary to make a Unix-like system was already 
available. 
 What they found was no accident--it was the GNU system.</font>  </p>
<p><font face="Helvetica, Arial, sans-serif" size="-1">  If we tried to measure
the GNU Project's contribution in this way, what would we conclude?  One
CD-ROM vendor found that in their ``Linux distribution'', GHU Software was
the largest single contingent, around 28% of the total source code, and this
included some of the essential major components without which there could
be no system.  Linux itself was about 3%.  So if you were going to pick a
name for the system based on who wrote the programs in the system, the most
appropriate single choice would be ``GNU''.  </font></p>
<font face="Helvetica, Arial, sans-serif" size="-1">The GNU Project's aim
was to develop <em>a complete free Unix-like system</em>: GNU.  </font><br>
<p><font face="Helvetica, Arial, sans-serif" size="-1">  We use Linux-based
GNU systems today for most of our work, and we hope you use them too.  But
please don't confuse the public by using the name ``Linux'' ambiguously.
 Linux is the kernel, one of the essential major components of the system.
 The system as a whole is more or less the GNU system, with Linux added.
 When you're talking about this combination, please call it ``GNU/Linux''. 
 </font></p>
<br>
<font face="Helvetica, Arial, sans-serif" size="-1">Shobhan Challa</font><br>
<br>
Roopa K wrote:<br>
<blockquote type="cite"
 cite="mid20021004090453.31412.qmail@xxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxx">
  <p>hi,</p>
 
  <p>thanx a lottttt for the replies...(for my posting "Linux CDs")</p>
 
  <p>first i'd like to apologize for not calling GNU/Linux by its proper
name - calling it as Linux is more of laziness than lack of acknowledgement
of GNU's contribution. if everybody knows that Linux = GNU + Linux kernel,
then we can stop calling it GNU/Linux.&nbsp; we can call Linux kernel as Linux
kernel and GNU softwares+Linux kernel as Linux; instead of asking everybody
to call it GNU/Linux. But Stallman wudn't like it :-) but we clamor for freedom
of thought... so i think we can 'freely' call it by any name :-)) .... please
mail me your thoughts and opinions ....</p>
 
  <p>yes, definitely, without GNU, Linux would have remained just an excellent
student project. </p>
 
  <p>one small thought on all this. (dunno if it is right.... plz don't bomb
my mailbox....). Without the contributions of innumerable scientists who
lived and died before Einstein, Einstein would have achieved nothing. He
wud have been forced to discover everything from structure of atom to gravity
to everything first, before he can even think about quantum physics or 
relativity
or whatever. he wudn't even have had pen and paper to write his theory. but
do we call it as: <br>
"kepler/galileo/newton/jim/carry/.../mom/dad/bohr/einstein's theory of 
relativity"?
  </p>
 
  <p>i didn't mean to be rude... hope you get the point though... plz tell
me what u think.</p>
 
  <p>i went home for a few days (coz of gandhi-jayanthi etc)... so i cudn't
reply the mails that i got from the members of this group (the mails that
i got directly). i'm sorry - i'll reply soon. thanx a lot to everybody....</p>
 
  <p>regards,<br>
roopa</p>
  <p><br>
  </p>
  <hr size="1">Do you Yahoo!?<br>
 New <a href="http://rd.yahoo.com/evt=1207/*http://sbc.yahoo.com/";>DSL Internet
Access</a> from SBC &amp; Yahoo! </blockquote>
<br>
</body>
</html>

--------------060709090403090801050407--


Other related posts: