[haiku-commits] Re: r41065 - haiku/trunk/src/apps/showimage

Stephan Aßmus <superstippi@xxxxxx> wrote:
> Am 21.03.2011 13:14, schrieb Axel Dörfler:
> > superstippi@xxxxxx wrote:
> >>   * Added appropriate work arounds for bugs in the Interface Kit
> >>     concerning the hiding of tool-tips, and a bug in the
> > > app_server
> >>     concerning the invalidation of unhidden views...
> > Is it really needed to waste your time like this?
[...]
> To be honest, I feel a bit upset about your mail. I hope it's ok to
> mention it and explain why: The basic problem is that I somehow cannot
> believe that you think I am not aware of the problems you mention. So
> as
> a result it feels like you don't trust my judgement of how I could
> make
> the best use of my time.

That's certainly not the conversation I wanted to trigger, but yes, I
obviously don't follow your judgement, or else I wouldn't have made
that comment.
It costs time to understand a problem well enough to be able to develop
a work-around for it in the first place, but unless you don't have the
ability to fix the underlying bug, it simply makes no sense to do so.
You just hid the bug, and made it less accessible and urgent for anyone
with the time to look into the problem. That's not helping anyone.

I probably wouldn't have mentioned it if I had realized that you
actually assigned the tickets to yourself, but I also wouldn't have
mentioned it if you hadn't already plastered Web+ and some other things
(LaunchBox?) with work-arounds for bugs in the tool tip code. The
underlying bug still has not been fixed to this day, and I think this
is just a poor result of those work arounds.
It takes time to put the work arounds in the code, and it takes time to
identify the work arounds, and remove them again later, and since they
hide a rather subtle and specific bug, they make fixing the bug a lot
less likely (unless you do it yourself). Chances are that work arounds
are forgotten in the code, and cause issues later on.
Work arounds are a bad coding practice, and should only be applied
rarely, and for a good reason.

> That's not even talking about the demotivating
> effect of such comments. Please consider the implications of your
> mail
> and how it was supposed to make me feel.

It's criticism, it's not meant to make you feel good :-) Of course I
could have worded it more carefully and nicer, but I consider you being
someone who can take criticism, but maybe I found a bad time.

Bye,
   Axel.


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