[hahs_63-68] Re: ironman

Richard,

 

I will try to answer your questions in some sort of sequence to make it make
sense.

 

We take our own bikes. Most airlines will accept them as a special luggage
request, and as long as you are within your luggage limit do not charge any
excess luggage fee. We normally put the bikes in a 'body bag', then put that
into a bike box, purchased for free from a bike shop. Handlebars usually go
sideways, pedals off, seat off, front wheel off, tyres deflated. Lots of
bubble wrap around breakable bits like lights, derailleur  and such. It all
fits in the bag, together with the tools and Jenan's saddle bags (pannier
bags).

 

No camping gear. See why later. We only carry about 20-22kg between us, and
the bikes as luggage are usually about 18kg when you include the tools etc.

 

We carry one pannier bag each on as hand luggage. Plus helmet.

 

Only usually book the first night. We usually assemble the bikes in the
airport and ride out of the airport. After that we cycle each day until we
are satisfied we have done enough - 70 to 120km, depending on where we are
and what there is to look at. Then we hassle for accommodation - farm stay,
hotel, pension, private house, B&B, whatever. Good way to meet the locals.
Usually wherever we stay does some sort of breakfast the next morning, and
we stop at a market somewhere to get fresh fruit or cheese or whatever for
lunch.

 

We don't so a lot of special training before a trip, but are normally fit
enough to do those sort of distances every day anyway.

 

Usually we follow a river system, Europe has lots of cycle paths beside the
rivers, separate to the roads, sometimes gravel, often bitumen. We use
touring bikes rather than mtn bikes. This next trip through the Balkans we
expect to be on country roads a lot more than usual, but the motorists in
Europe are usually a lot more cycle friendly than here.

 

We don't bother carrying the gear for blogging, but a close friend has set
up an excellent website that he also blogs on - loads of really good advice
for first-time cycle tourers in Europe especially.
http://pedallingeurope.com/ 

 

Used to hang onto trucks as a kid in Camden, following the coal trucks into
town. Until  I came off one day, in Yr 9, I think. Lost lots of skin and
fur. Stopped me from riding to Mick Christopher's at Batemans Bay over Xmas
hols.

 

That's enough yap yap for now. Ask me more if you want, but within the next
three weeks.

 

Cheers to all,

Des

 

From: hahs_63-68-bounce@xxxxxxxxxxxxx
[mailto:hahs_63-68-bounce@xxxxxxxxxxxxx] On Behalf Of ricchap@xxxxxxxxxxx
Sent: Thursday, 19 April 2012 10:22 PM
To: hahs_63-68@xxxxxxxxxxxxx
Subject: [hahs_63-68] ironman

 

Geoffrey Graham, Des Cannon,

Geoff. Terrific, mate. 12hr 32m 23s. An improvement of 19m from Busselton.
Improved in each of the 3 legs.

I note the cycle leg improved 2m in 6hr. It seems that is the "rate
determining step". I guess that would be where you would be putting most
effort in training now. The wind must play havoc with times in that leg. I
imagine finding time for endurance training of that magnitude would not be
easy.

How did you perform in your age division?

I presume you will be travelling to Hawaii. Do you get any assistance with
flights or accommodation? Is the family going too?

What I would really like to know is what emotions do you go through at
different stages? Do you have a race plan that prevents you from deep pain?
Do you ever stop with intent to retire, then recover and battle on?

What does it feel like the next day? How long does it take to get over a
triathlon?

One thing I will advise, don't keep setting yourself goals. You've already
proven yourself. There aren't many humans on the planet that have achieved
what you have. You're entitled now to sit back and write a book. You've
earnt the right to go on walk-a-thons, you know.

Des, while I'm in this vein. I have been fascinated with your European
summer bicycle excursions, but never got around to ask.

If it was from the point of view of someone who had just finished their
formal studying and wanted to bicycle around overseas, what grass-roots
preparation would you recommend?

If you can run a sub-3 hour marathon, then training and fitness are
essential.

Is it best to organize a group of like-minded people?

What considerations are there when selecting a country?

Do you arrange through the internet for accommodation for the first few
nights? Have you teed up a bike (with modifications) to collect upon
arrival?

What equipment is essential? What do you look out for when selecting camping
spots?

  In other words, can you arrive overseas and then realize that there was
something you should have considered before you left?

Could motor scooters be used in lieu of bikes?

Have you written a book?

Do you hang onto the back of trucks when going uphill?

Shut up Richard. Yap yap yap.

Well done fellas,

Richard

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