[geocentrism] Re: (no subject)

Actually Pauls question is far more complicated from my view. In any case what 
is the sidereal day for the moon? 

If HC is correct then the stars will have a sidereal period close to 28 days. 
The instantaneous disruption of uncreating the earth in an instant will cause 
the moon to fly off in many different spirals around the sun according to which 
point of its orbit it was released. However it would most probably maintain its 
rotation, and so the sidereal day on the moon would be still 28 days. give or 
take. 

But my imagination is wont to consider what is the sidereal period today if GC 
is correct. Though the moons rotation would be 24 hours in keeping with a 24 
hour orbit, I pose it would still maintain a sidereal day of 28 earth days 
because the stars motions around the world maintains the same relative motions.

If HC is boxed in, so are we. There is as we have said a thousand times no 
method in this universe for us to distinguish which is moving and which is not 
in relation to each other. 

I had hypothesised months back that both EMR and or a flywheel stability would 
give us a static platform to make observations... But this is not the case if 
we resort to a rotating aether, which is the only way we can explain the 
geostationary satellite. 

God has us stumped. boxed in..  

Philip. 


----- Original Message ----- 
  From: Paul Deema 
  To: Geocentrism@xxxxxxxxxxxxx 
  Sent: Saturday, December 15, 2007 9:36 PM
  Subject: (no subject)


  Allen D

  I asked the question -

  "What will be the Moon's sidereal period subsequent to the Earth vanishing at 
Full Moon".

  Here is your 'definitive' statement offered in answer to that question -

  " If the moon is still be moving the way it did before the earth's 
disappearance then it will see exactly the same things the same way it did 
before the earths disappearance."

  If I understand you correctly, your statement could be rendered more 
succinctly by - 

  "If the Moon's motion subsequent to the event is unchanged, then its view 
will be unchanged."

  First, it does not answer the question which sought the magnitude of the 
sidereal period. Second, it is incorrect in that the Earth will no longer be in 
view. Third, it supposes the suspension of the laws of physics in unnecessarily 
anticipating unchanged motion on the part of the Moon upon the tragic loss of 
its primary. Fourth, it is essentially a null statement of the form "If nothing 
has changed then nothing is changed".

  The complete text of your reply was -

  1. I did make a difinitive statment!? 

  2. I have never been to the moon and observer it’s sidereal period and 
neither have you or anyone else for that matter! Thus, any other answer to your 
question would be based on assumptions.........!?

  Taking 2. and leaving aside the annoying contradiction that this is both a 
statement and a question, I observe the assumption that neither I nor anyone 
else has been to the Moon and observed its sidereal period. I personally don't 
have the problem with assumption (together with 'theory', 'believe' or 'belief' 
and 'faith' among others that are routinely and narrowly used by 
fundamentalists) that you do (as witnessed by the concluding sentence) but on 
what grounds and in the face of overwhelming evidence to the contrary do you 
make this assumption? (Rhetorical question!)

  The point is that the Moon's sidereal period has been known for centuries and 
could be determined by you to a tolerable level of accuracy from your own back 
yard armed with little more than your eyes, a clock, a little patience and 
perseverance and a pencil and paper. The level of confidence in the accuracy of 
your answer would be superior to that attending your determination of the 
height of a tree in your neighbourhood by the use of a crude theodolite and the 
principle of proportionality. In case it was missed, it is not necessary to 
climb a tree with a ruler in order to determine its height just as it is not 
necessary to journey to the Moon with scientific paraphernalia to determine its 
sidereal period. To insist otherwise is to engage in sophistry.

  Far from the definitive statement you suggest, I suggest that it is an 
equivocating collection of mealy mouthed weasel words.

  So then, I'll put the question again. Given the long known and generally 
accepted value for the Moon's sidereal period of approximately 27.322 earth 
mean solar days and the universality of the laws of physics, what change would 
you predict in this value were the Earth to vanish at the time of the Full Moon?

  Paul D

  PS As a concession, you need not have the Earth depart this realm at Full 
Moon -- any time you choose is acceptable.

  Paul Deema <paul_deema@xxxxxxxxxxx> wrote: 

  Allen D 

  So essentially you lack the courage to make a definitive statement. 

  Paul D 



  ----- Original Message ----
  From: Allen Daves <allendaves@xxxxxxxxxxxxxx>
  To: geocentrism@xxxxxxxxxxxxx
  Sent: Friday, 14 December, 2007 4:31:02 PM
  Subject: [geocentrism] Re: Rotation of camera


  Paul, 

  1. I say things the way i do to get a certain response . 

  2. the answer to your question is " If the moon is still be moving the way it 
did before the earth's disapearance then it will see exactly the same things 
the same way it did before the earths disappearance."

  Paul Deema <paul_deema@xxxxxxxxxxx> wrote: 

  Allen D
  Comments in this <colour>. 

  Paul D 




  ----- Original Message ----
  From: Allen Daves <allendaves@xxxxxxxxxxxxxx>
  To: geocentrism@xxxxxxxxxxxxx
  Sent: Friday, 14 December, 2007 3:24:22 PM
  Subject: [geocentrism] Re: Rotation of camera


  Paul, 

  I am Qoting Regner with my comments in blue:...I think we have found a source 
of some misunderstandings here...Sidereal means "with respect to the stars". No 
misunderstaning .<Then why the prevarication about determining sidereal 
periods?>.You sit on the Moon, look in a particular direction and see a star.
  The rotation of the Moon on it's axis, cause the stars to seem to
  rotate around the pole of that axis (the star trails).
  The stars will pass by your field of view. Right. 

  If the moon is still be moving the way it did before the earth's disapearance 
then it will see exactly the same things the same way it did before the earths 
disappearance...? <Is this a question or a statement?> 

  Rotation and gravitation are not one and the same things nor are they 
dependent upon each other. <I'm not aware that anyone has suggested that they 
are.> Gravity is and can only be used as a force for the vectors in your 
question. <I didn't ask for vectors.> However, a Gravity feild does not define 
what is and is not a rotation? <Is this a question or a statement?> and <I'm 
not aware that anyone has suggested that they are.> ...What are you trying to 
get at..? <I'm not trying to 'get at' anything. I asked a simple question in 
the hope of receiving a simple answer. No prevarication, no muddying of the 
waters, no obfuscation, no superfluous explanations, no eel-like manoeuvres -- 
a simple answer to the question "What will be the Moon's sidereal period 
subsequent to the Earth vanishing at Full Moon".>



  Regner Trampedach <art@xxxxxxxxxx> wrote: 

  Quoting Allen Daves :

  > 
  > If the earth "vanishish" then how do you define a change in sidereal
  > period? For that matter how could you define a sidereal period at all?....
  > 
  You stare out in your particular direction until that particular
  star comes back to the same position. The time that took, is the
  sidereal period of the Moon.

  That star (any star) is your reference point, external to the Moon,
  that enables you to directly measure the rotation.

  The same, of course, works for the Earth, or any celestial object.

  - Regner


  > Read comments below....
  > 
  > Paul Deema wrote:
  > 
  > Allen D
  > No Allen -- no black dots, no brown circles, no shaft, no 'shaft
  > rotation.png'. The Earth, the Moon, the Moon's sidereal period. Go!
  > Paul D
  > 
  > I’m not sure i understand your question, but look at the 
attached
  > diagram. If the (earth) vanishes, the (moon) will still rotate around that
  > same "dimensionless" point& axis that lay outside of the moon (brown circle)
  > at whatever rate it was before. The axis and common point do not have to lay
  > in/on a physical body. (I.e. a barycenter) thus "dimensionless" = no 
physical
  > form nessisary to be real, although it gets it's meaning, location and
  > deffintion from the condition and relationships of physical forms.
  > 
  > Assumptions about gravity or the center of the universe do not define a
  > rotation either way?..The/any changes in force and gravitational influence,
  > hold equaly true for the shaft. If the nuclear and molecular bonds ( glue...
  > akin to gravity in the universe) in the shaft sudenly disapear then the 
shaft
  > will explode...?
  > 
  > Paul Deema wrote: 
  > 
  > Allen D
  > Knowledgeable of your love of mind experiments ... just kidding |[:-). All
  > the same I have one for you which concerns rotation of the Moon.
  > The Moon has a sidereal period of approximately 27.322 mean solar days. At
  > full moon the Earth vanishes. Will its sidereal period change and if so by
  > (roughly) how much?
  > Paul D




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