[g2i2008] Re: Ride(s)

I did a similar ride in the Snowys a few years ago in heat and witnessed a very 
fit (training for ironman) bloke lose the power of speech from dehydration - he 
was given a magnesium supplement and recovered enough to finish.  It was a hard 
ride (200km with a 20km climb, a 15km climb and two 10km climbs) and would have 
been in early 30s. For what it is worth, I was using an Endura electrolyte 
replacement product (cant remember exact name) which I have always found good 
on long rides (one bottle of water, one of endura). I think it is important to 
try things out ahead of time because your system might react unfavourably 
(nothing worse than extreme flatulence when riding in a group).


-----Original Message-----
From: g2i2008-bounce@xxxxxxxxxxxxx [mailto:g2i2008-bounce@xxxxxxxxxxxxx] On 
Behalf Of marktcaporn@xxxxxxxxxxxxxxx
Sent: Friday, 1 February 2008 10:51 PM
To: g2i2008@xxxxxxxxxxxxx
Subject: [g2i2008] Re: Ride(s)

Didn't mean to scare you.Though I did read a letter published in Cycling 
Australia by a rider who had convulsions on the the return trip to Melb after a 
very hot Snowy Mountain 3 peaks ride.  Fortunately his girlfriend was driving 
and he had no long term problems.  He claimed to have had electrolyte 
supplements along the ride and wanted to warn others on the potential hazzards 
of exercise in extreme heat .

Mark



> DRIVER, Ian <Ian.DRIVER@xxxxxxxxxxxxxxx> wrote:
>
> Right. You're starting to scare me now. I just wanted to ride my bike.
> Now I have to be concerned about dying.
>
>
>
> The bus seats are looking very comfy just now. I could have a couple
> of beers. Play some Nintendo. Listen to music.
>
>
>
> After my experience on Monday I will be taking my camping fold up
> toilet seat on the ride. Just got to work out some straps for the back.
>
>
>
> Ian Driver
> A/Manager
> School Financial Services
> 3237 0720
>
>
>
> ________________________________
>
> From: g2i2008-bounce@xxxxxxxxxxxxx
> [mailto:g2i2008-bounce@xxxxxxxxxxxxx]
> On Behalf Of Tim Stephens
> Sent: Wednesday, January 30, 2008 9:20 PM
> To: g2i2008@xxxxxxxxxxxxx
> Subject: [g2i2008] Re: Ride(s)
>
>
>
> Hi guys,
>
>
>
> Mark is on the mark with the requirements for salt during exercise -
> you can see this effect if your sweat dries on your skin with only
> salt crystals left over! A lot of sports drinks such as Gatorade or
> powerade DO have lots of salts and sugar but the type of salt is often
> ignored by drink manufacturers. Whether this is via poor research or -
> more probably - to maintain profit margins, most of these popular
> drinks have the wrong salt balance.
>
>
>
> Don't quote me on the exact ratios needed but you need more than just
> 'table salt' (Sodium Chloride, NaCl) to fulfill requirements. A good
> balance of Potassium, magnesium and other trace salts is very
> important to maintaining correct cellular osmotic potential. If your
> cells loose their salts, then they lose their ability to retain water
> and many critical cell functions start to malfunction. Magnesium and
> potassium are critical to maintain correct neuro-muscular synapse
> function (the connections between your brain, nervous system and
> ultimately muscles) hence why correctly formulated drinks will have a variety 
> of salts.
>
>
>
> What I usually do is put together a mix of dextrose and a small amount
> of glucose with endura powder and that suffices for most intense
> activity. This combination worked well last year for Grafton.
>
>
>
> You'll have to find your preferred combination but that may be a good
> start for most people!
>
>
>
> I think a lot of people also ignore protein requirements for endurance
> athletes - and yes, that includes EVERYONE on this list. After a long
> ride, sure you have to stock up on carbs but your body will be
> breaking down protein AS WELL as sugar. You need to repair your
> muscles too and two good eggs right after will fulfill that. I try to
> steer clear of protein powders as apart from 'catabolising' your bank
> balance, the protein quality is always compared to eggs with eggs
> always coming out on top.
>
>
>
> Anyway, enough typing, thanks for the input Mark, Martin.
>
>
>
> ******Are there any other suggestions for drinks / recovery foods??
> *****
>
>
>
> Cheers,
>
>
>
> Tim
>
>
>
> ________________________________
>
> From: g2i2008-bounce@xxxxxxxxxxxxx
> [mailto:g2i2008-bounce@xxxxxxxxxxxxx]
> On Behalf Of Martin Tame
> Sent: Wednesday, 30 January 2008 8:25 PM
> To: g2i2008@xxxxxxxxxxxxx
> Subject: [g2i2008] Re: Ride(s)
>
>
>
> On the quantity question. it may be an interesting exercise to weigh
> yourselves before our next session and again after.
>
>
>
> It's normal that you would vary slightly, but if there is a big drop
> you should be concerned.
>
>
>
> Similarly if there was a significant increase then hyponatraemia may
> be a concern.
>
>
>
>
>
> Otherwise, congratulations to all - a good ride that should give
> everyone plenty of confidence.
>
> ________________________________
>
> From: g2i2008-bounce@xxxxxxxxxxxxx on behalf of
> marktcaporn@xxxxxxxxxxxxxxx
> Sent: Wed 30/01/2008 17:55
> To: g2i2008@xxxxxxxxxxxxx
> Subject: [g2i2008] Re: Ride(s)
>
> I dont normally get into discussions outside my speciality of medicine
> and sports nutrition certainly was not covered in lectures either
> undergrad or post grad but I certainly agree with Tim.
>
>  A few other things to consider it will be hot so we will sweat alot
> and for the unacclimatised to heat this can be huge ( prob 1l an hour
> ) and with large quantities of sodium so you need to drink a balanced
> electrolyte solution to replace not only water loss but sodium loss.
> Simply drinking large quantities of water is not suitable and
> potentially dangerous.  Hyponatraemia or low blood sodium results in
> neurologic and cardiac problems and is potentially fatal if extreme.
> There are many cases of siezures in hyponatraemic athletes.
>
> Acclimatisation results in larger sweat volumes,  up to 2l an hr, but
> much lower sodium losses.
>
> The need for replacement needs to be tempered with the problems
> encountered as a result of  inappropriate consumption.  This can be in
> terms of composition ( sorry Ian I think you may have been victim to
> this - from my enquiry dont have Magnesium while we ride ) or quantity.
>
> Quantity is easy - a little, often.
>
> Composition is harder - I would recommend a commercial product made up
> in the advised concentration.  Ideal is a balance of
> carbohydrate/sugar for energy - too high a concentration slows
> absorption & too little and you risk bonking.  Electrolytes in high
> concentration cause abdominal pains and diarrhoea.
>
> The reason for a commercial product is they have the money to do
> testing on the formulation.  If they cause problems then people will
> not buy them, so even if they dont want too its a commercial reality
> they have to spend time and money on the formulation.  Find a bar and
> a liquid you like.
>
> I'm sure professor Tim will have a further comment and I look forward
> too it.  If I have got some of my quantities incorrect sorry,  but the
> same principles stand.  You need carbs and electrolytes to get through
> a big ride in the heat.
>
> I am interested in more hill climb rides
>
> Mark
>
>
>
> > tim.stephens@xxxxxxxxxxxxxxx wrote:
> >
> >
> > Hi Everyone,
> >
> > Hope you all had a good time on Sunday for our Mt Mee ride. The
> > climb hopefully gave everyone a good impression of the Gibraltar
> > range for Grafton next month.
> >
> > Couple of things that came out of the ride:
> >
> > Food consumption.
> > Riding 80km is different to riding 120km and constant food intake is
> > a must. Carbohydrate is depleated very quickly. While you can
> > replenish your supply after our usual 80km bay ride, anything over
> > that distance and you run the risk of a sugar low.
> >
> > Best advice is to eat a little and eat often. Mix your favourite
> energy
> > bars with gels and water every 30 minutes without fail. It will be
> > hot so keep your fluids up constantly. The first 100 or so will go
> > very quickly but the trick is to keep the energy going for the next
> > 100km
> of
> > short climbs. Ignore the temptation to power up the rolling hills
> > and instead resort to an easy gear to keep the cadence high and
> > maintain sugar supply in favour for burning fat.
> >
> > Pacing up the hill.
> > As far as I'm aware, everyone went at their own speed up the climb
> which
> > was fantastic. Like it or not, we will break into smaller groups.
> > Wait at the top and regroup into our original fast/slow bunches.
> > There will be a feed station at the bottom to take on water and food
> > and another
> at
> > the top. From memory, Rene found a spot half way up to park the bus
> and
> > offer supplies to those in need so if that could be done again, it
> would
> > be great. The climb should take about an hour.
> >
> > I'll be doing the Mt. Mee circuit on a weekly basis right up until
> > Grafton so let me know if anyone wants to join in!
> >
> > Cheers,
> >
> > Tim


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