RE: Migration advice desired

  • From: "Lara, Greg" <GLara@xxxxxxx>
  • To: "'[ExchangeList]'" <exchangelist@xxxxxxxxxxxxx>
  • Date: Wed, 15 Sep 2004 13:12:06 -0400

Thank you Al, Mike. Al, 21 servers is correct; some sites are without their
own server currently.

Since I'm also the network folks (and glad to cooperate :) and our MRTG
indicates that generally we've got only moderate usage on the hub site T1s,
I am of the opinion that the specific traffic characteristics of Outlook
will help me determine whether we'll be pushing our current envelope. To
this end, that document Mike referenced will be very helpful.


Thanks again, guys.

Greg Lara
IT Department
Anti-Defamation League
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-----Original Message-----
From: Michael B. Smith [mailto:michael@xxxxxxxxxx] 
Sent: Wednesday, September 15, 2004 12:08 PM
To: [ExchangeList]
Subject: [exchangelist] RE: Migration advice desired

http://www.MSExchange.org/

I would add that in an Exchange 2003/Windows 2003/Outlook 2003
environment, buffer packing can come into play which tends to reduce
overall network traffic. CliNetTraf.doc, on the microsoft downloads
site, goes into network requirements in detail and how they are affected
by various versions of these pieces of software. 

-----Original Message-----
From: Mulnick, Al [mailto:Al.Mulnick@xxxxxxxxxx] 
Sent: Wednesday, September 15, 2004 11:55 AM
To: [ExchangeList]
Subject: [exchangelist] RE: Migration advice desired

http://www.MSExchange.org/

I'm going to assume 29 servers vs. 21 else there's a quizzical look on
my face as I type this ;)

Greg, RPC/HTTP is not designed to save bandwidth.  If anything, since it
encapsulates RPC it could be more traffic.  The saving grace is that
it's
HTTP(S) and therefore can be sent into networks via well-known entry
ways.
It's possible that it could be less, but not likely.

Cached mode is designed to produce a better user experience only.  It is
not designed to save bandwidth nor prevent network traffic.  If
anything, it has the potential to produce more traffic since you have to
download every message regardless of wanting it or not. Online mode
doesn't have to download every message, but rather the header
information is displayed to the client (depending on the view chosen by
the client; by default it's going to download every message you look at
since it puts it in that crazy view pane).

The trick to putting Outlook across a WAN is to know what your AVAILABLE
bandwidth is vs. your total possible as well as figuring out how to make
the servers faster than the requests so that when a request comes in,
there is as little wait time at the server to service the request as
possible.  That means you have a lower total roundtrip for
request/response and your client gets a better experience in terms of
performance.

In your case, cached mode/RPC/HTTP(S) might be helpful if the clients
are allowed to use an internet connection to the server and are not
restricted/crowded on that internet connection (obviously it's an
ecosystem so your Exchange server network has to have enough bandwidth
as well).

My advice?  I'd check with the network folks and find out available,
peak, and average bandwidth utilization today and try to project what my
usage scenarios are going to be.  I'm not one who likes to deploy
servers in a decentralized manner for control purposes, so I would want
to do everything I could to get to your end goal of 5 servers in hub
sites.  Saying that, I've done just that, but you have to do your
homework.

Feel free to ping me off-line if you have any questions I can help with.

Al   

-----Original Message-----
From: Lara, Greg [mailto:GLara@xxxxxxx]
Sent: Tuesday, September 14, 2004 11:33 AM
To: [ExchangeList]
Subject: [exchangelist] Migration advice desired

http://www.MSExchange.org/

I've been in the planning stages of a migration project (Exchange 5.5 to
2003) for quite a while now. I've thought a lot about my org's
infrastructure and have produced detailed plans and diagrams explaining
the whys and wherefores for my boss and co-workers. There's some
reticence being expressed at the viability of the plan, so I wanted to
run it by some of my peers.

In summary, we've got 21 Exchange servers, distributed amongst 29 sites,
that support about 500 users. The WAN consists of a point-to-point VPN
connected over full T1's and broadband (minimum bandwidth of 768k). All
clients are running Outlook 2002 in MAPI mode. The plan is to
consolidate those 21 5.5 servers into 5 2003 servers, which will be
placed in regionally central "hub" sites. Clients in sites that
currently don't have an Exchange server connect to their server over the
WAN; clients that will be losing a server will do the same. The average
number of clients on the consolidated hub servers will be about 85, with
anywhere from 40 to 70 of those clients located at remote sites.

The concern is that client "performance" will be significantly
diminished, particularly for those losing a local server. Clients that
currently connect to remote servers sometimes experience  delays, the
source of which aren't not always easy to diagnose. There is also a
concern that the T1 at the hub sites won't be adequate for both local
use in addition to VPN and Outlook client traffic. I agree and feel that
may need to go with multiplexed T1s in those locations.

I know of companies who have consolidated hundreds of users into single
remote servers, but they tend to have huge pipes that can accommodate
the extra traffic.

So, the big questions are: Will we save on client access bandwidth by
using RPC over HTTP? Does anyone reading this have experience with
remote client access over WAN links? If so, can you offer feedback on
the client experience? Any other thoughts or suggestions?

Thanks all.


Greg Lara

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-----Original Message-----
From: Periyasamy, Raj [mailto:Raj.Periyasamy@xxxxxxxxxxxx]
Sent: Tuesday, September 14, 2004 9:07 AM
To: [ExchangeList]
Subject: [exchangelist] RE: RPC over HTTPS and Outlook 2003

http://www.MSExchange.org/

Mustafa,
I hope you have configured your Outlook correctly for RPC Over HTTP.
Before you test the RPC over HTTP across the firewall, try to test it
within the LAN. Follow the steps below to create the profile, and test
this configuration in LAN. Make sure the Outlook is using only HTTPS and
not TCP/IP to connect to Exchange server. You can check this by
Control+right clicking on the Outlook icon in the task bar, and
selecting Connection status. Let me know if this works first before
proceeding further.


On the Exchange Server Settings page, do the following steps:
a.      In the Microsoft Exchange Server box, type the name of your
back-end Exchange server where your mailbox resides.
b.      Select the check box next to Use Cached Exchange Mode (optional,
recommended).
c.      In the User Name box, type the user name.
d.      Click More Settings.
e.      On the Connection tab, in the Exchange over the Internet pane,
select the Connect to my Exchange mailbox using HTTP check box.
f.      Click Exchange Proxy Settings.

On the Exchange Proxy Settings page, under Connections Settings, do the
following steps: 

a.      Enter the fully qualified domain name (FQDN) of the RPC proxy
server in the Use this URL to connect to my proxy server for Exchange
box.
b.      Select the Connect using SSL only check box.
c.      Next, select the Mutually authenticate the session when
connecting with SSL check box.
d.      Enter the FQDN of the RPC proxy server in the Principle name for
proxy server box. Use the format: msstd:FQDN of RPC Proxy Server.
e.      As an optional step, you can configure Outlook 2003 to connect
to your Exchange server using RPC over HTTP by default by selecting the
check box next to On fast networks, connect to Exchange using HTTP
first, then connect using TCP/IP. 


Regards,

Raj



-----Original Message-----
From: Mustafa Cicek [mailto:mbcicek@xxxxxxxxx]
Sent: Tuesday, September 14, 2004 9:36 AM
To: [ExchangeList]
Subject: [exchangelist] RPC over HTTPS and Outlook 2003

http://www.MSExchange.org/

Hi!

I think, I configured all (on server and client) for RPC over HTTPS
correctly.
Unfortunately, Outlook 2003 cannot connect to my Exchange Server 2003. 
It tries to connect over TCP 135 (RCP Port Mapper). I expected that it
tries over HTTP/HTTPS connections. I logged this behaviour per Ethereal
tool on my Outlook client computer.

I have the following network configuration for Exchange Services:
INTERNET <> NETSCREEN FIREWALL 1 <> ISA Server 2004 <> NETSCREEN
FIREWALL 2 <> INTERNAL NETWORK with Front-End-Excahneg +
Back-End-Exchange + Global Catalog.

Outlook Webb Access over HTTPS works very well. I have the same
Certificate and the same Common Name for RPC connections.
I tested https://owa.intra.exchtest.net/rpc successfull (403.2 error).

My Outlook client computer has Windows XP with SP2. I uses a proxy from
client network, but NO proxy script on Internet Explorer, only proxy
ports and address.

I think that is a problem from Outlook 2003?
Can you give me any tipp please!

Thanks
Mustafa

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