[bct] Re: Another idea about recorders

  • From: "Neal Ewers" <neal.ewers@xxxxxxxxxxxxxx>
  • To: <blindcooltech@xxxxxxxxxxxxx>
  • Date: Wed, 15 Mar 2006 11:54:14 -0600

Mike, you said,
"Wow Neal, I have to think about this: The noise floor doesn't change,
right? It's just that you drop the volume of the recorded material
relative to the constant noise floor with the change seeming to bring up
the noise floor?"

That is correct.  And you managed to say it in fewer words than I did
too.  The time you really notice this is when the recording becomes more
quiet than other parts.  The noise floor has been, in essence, brought
up and thus, with less signal, you can hear the noise floor more.

Neal




-----Original Message-----
From: blindcooltech-bounce@xxxxxxxxxxxxx
[mailto:blindcooltech-bounce@xxxxxxxxxxxxx] On Behalf Of Mike
Sent: Monday, March 13, 2006 9:26 PM
To: blindcooltech@xxxxxxxxxxxxx
Subject: [bct] Re: Another idea about recorders


Wow Neal, I have to think about this: The noise floor doesn't change,
right? It's just that you drop the volume of the recorded material
relative to the constant noise floor with the change seeming to bring up
the noise floor?

I tried to record some Chinese drummers out in front of a restaurant in
New York City with the limiter on. It pumped so bad I discarded the
recording. But then again, I think the limiter helped when I recorded
the subway which can be extremely loud. The bass cut really helped too.
Mike

-----Original Message-----
From: blindcooltech-bounce@xxxxxxxxxxxxx
[mailto:blindcooltech-bounce@xxxxxxxxxxxxx]On Behalf Of Neal Ewers
Sent: Monday, March 13, 2006 9:47 AM
To: blindcooltech@xxxxxxxxxxxxx
Subject: [bct] Re: Another idea about recorders


Actually, applying a limiter or compressor may give you more noise,
because you are in a round about way raising the noise floor noise along
with the low volume speech sounds.

Neal



-----Original Message-----
From: blindcooltech-bounce@xxxxxxxxxxxxx
[mailto:blindcooltech-bounce@xxxxxxxxxxxxx] On Behalf Of Brent Harding
Sent: Friday, March 10, 2006 9:50 PM
To: blindcooltech@xxxxxxxxxxxxx
Subject: [bct] Re: Another idea about recorders


Wouldn't applying compression squash out most of the noise you get? You
would have to apply it in an editor. I think Goldwave's hiss reduction
works OK for wav files that originally came from mpeg files recorded off
my TV

tuner card. Considering that the source is really digitized analog cable

once it's on the hard drive, it doesn't sound too bad if run through the

goldwave stuff. I say the local channels versus cable networks sound a
little worse, but none are great.

----- Original Message -----
From: "Neal Ewers" <neal.ewers@xxxxxxxxxxxxxx>
To: <blindcooltech@xxxxxxxxxxxxx>
Sent: Friday, March 10, 2006 1:17 PM
Subject: [bct] Re: Another idea about recorders


> Pam, recording with the internal mike does result in some rather poor 
> quality.  However, with the proper external mike, it is quite nice. It

> still has more floor noise or additional hiss than I would like, but 
> it is much better with an external mike.  This is especially true if 
> you are using a headset mike.  In this way you are much closer to the 
> mike and your voice will mask out a good deal of the background sound.
>
> Neal
>
>
>
> -----Original Message-----
> From: blindcooltech-bounce@xxxxxxxxxxxxx
> [mailto:blindcooltech-bounce@xxxxxxxxxxxxx] On Behalf Of Pam Quinn
> Sent: Friday, March 10, 2006 1:17 PM
> To: blindcooltech@xxxxxxxxxxxxx
> Subject: [bct] Re: Another idea about recorders
>
>
> And why is it that the recording quality both with the Pacmate and the

> MPower is so poor I wonder? Even at the highest quality settings, 
> MPower recordings have a crackling sound in the background. It's not 
> the bitrate that's the problem, and for as expensive as those machines

> are, you'd think they could at least have the recording quality of a 
> laptop--otherwise, why bother?
>
> Pam
>
>
>
>
>
>
>







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