blind_html Fwd: Fred's Head Companion - American Printing House for the Blind

  • From: Nimer Jaber <nimerjaber1@xxxxxxxxx>
  • To: blind_html <blind_html@xxxxxxxxxxxxx>
  • Date: Wed, 17 Jun 2009 08:55:10 -0400

Hello,

Please take a look at the last three articles, or at least these are
the ones that interest me.

Thanks
Nimer J

---------- Forwarded message ----------
From: Fred's Head from APH <fredshead@xxxxxxx>
Date: Wed, 17 Jun 2009 12:08:06 +0000
Subject: Fred's Head Companion - American Printing House for the Blind
To: nimerjaber1@xxxxxxxxx

Fred's Head from APH

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Setting the Stage for Tactile Understanding: "Making Tactile Pictures Make
Sense"

Posted: 16 Jun 2009 11:45 AM PDT
http://feedproxy.google.com/~r/FredsHeadCompanion/~3/A-TFRuso6Uw/setting-stage-for-tactile-understanding.html




This set of tangible items and activities assists young tactile readers in
making the transition from the exploration of real objects to the
interpretation of two-dimensional representations, both in thermoformed
formats and simple raised-line illustrations. A 3-dimensional house model
aids with advanced understanding of scale and perspective. Includes:


Large Print Guidebook (Braille Guidebook available separately)

12 real objects

12 thermoformed cards depicting real objects

12 raised-line cards depicting the real objects

12 black-line masters of the real objects

1 activity sorting tray with Veltex backing

3 black tray divider cards

1 three-dimensional house model

20 tactile correct/incorrect house matching cards

1 package of Crayola Model Magic

1 package of Wikki-Stix

Carrying case



Recommended ages: 5 years and up.


WARNING: Choking Hazard -- Small Parts. Not intended for children ages 5
and under without adult supervision.



Complete Kit:

Catalog Number: 1-08853-00



Optional Item:



Braille Guidebook:

Catalog Number: 5-08853-00



Replacement Item:



Large Print Guidebook:

Catalog Number: 7-08853-00

Click this link to purchase Setting the Stage for Tactile Understanding
Kit: Making Tactile Pictures Make Sense.



American Printing House for the Blind, Inc.

1839 Frankfort Avenue

Mailing Address: P.O. Box 6085

Louisville, Kentucky 40206-0085

Toll Free: 800-223-1839

Phone: 502-895-2405

Fax: 502-899-2274

E-mail: info@xxxxxxx

Web site: http://www.aph.org

APH Shopping Home: http://shop.aph.org



///////////////////////////////////////////
Explore The World With Teaching Touch

Posted: 16 Jun 2009 11:13 AM PDT
http://feedproxy.google.com/~r/FredsHeadCompanion/~3/hkXgErd-71I/explore-world-with-teaching-touch.html




Teaching Touch helps parents or teachers encourage young children (ages
4-7) who are blind to  become active explorers and readers of tactile
graphics. Teaching Touch uses real stories to bring important points to
life. Various skills that contribute to  exploration and appreciation of
tactile graphics are addressed.
These include:


tracking

searching

verbal description

use of symbols



Teaching Touch includes a separate booklet that introduces the use of
exercise sheets to promote  tactile tracking, scanning, and comparison.

Teaching Touch Kit:

Catalog Number: 1-08861-00



Replacement Large Print Manual:

Catalog Number: 7-08861-00



Optional Braille Manual:

Catalog Number: 5-08861-00

Click this link to purchase the Teaching Touch Kit.



American Printing House for the Blind, Inc.

1839 Frankfort Avenue

Mailing Address: P.O. Box 6085

Louisville, Kentucky 40206-0085

Toll Free: 800-223-1839

Phone: 502-895-2405

Fax: 502-899-2274

E-mail: info@xxxxxxx

Web site: http://www.aph.org

APH Shopping Home: http://shop.aph.org



///////////////////////////////////////////
The Braille Connection: Braille Reading Program For Newly Blinded Print
Readers

Posted: 16 Jun 2009 10:55 AM PDT
http://feedproxy.google.com/~r/FredsHeadCompanion/~3/xyEJAx8SsBw/braille-connection-braille-reading.html



Message: Can you supply a list of curriculum materials to use for teaching
braille to adolescents who are beginning braille users?

location: Maryland


Braille Connection is designed to aid students in making the transition
from print to braille by leading them through several levels of
instruction. The program begins by helping students to develop skills in
tactual discrimination. It then goes on to teach Grade 1 Braille which
corresponds letter-for-letter with print. Finally, Braille Connection
introduces Grade 2 Braille, which is the standard form of braille used in
publications such as books and magazines. Developed by APH and the National
Federation of the Blind (NFB).


Braille Connection is designed to be used under the supervision of a
qualified braille teacher, and may be used for instruction in a variety of
settings. This includes rehabilitation agencies in which clients work
regularly with a consultant; at home where students work under the
supervision of a teacher or consultant--either in person, by mail, or by
phone; and in schools where the students work directly with a teacher.



Braille Connection:



Print Kit:

Catalog Number: 7-11100-00



Braille Kit:

Catalog Number: 5-11100-00



Items Available Separately:



Teacher's Edition:



Print:

Catalog Number: 7-11101-00



Braille:

Catalog Number: 5-11101-00



Student Workbook:



Uncontracted Braille:

Catalog Number: 5-11103-00



Contracted Braille:

Catalog Number: 5-11104-00



Student Practice Book:



Uncontracted Braille:


Catalog Number: 5-11105-00



Contracted Braille:

Catalog Number: 5-11106-00



Mentoring Manual:



Print:

Catalog Number: 7-11102-00



Braille:

Catalog Number: 5-11102-00



Chart of Braille Contractions:

Catalog Number: 5-17110-00



Related Items:



Braille in Brief:

Catalog Number: 5-17100-00

Click this link to purchase the Braille Connection Kit.



American Printing House for the Blind, Inc.

1839 Frankfort Avenue

Mailing Address: P.O. Box 6085

Louisville, Kentucky 40206-0085

Toll Free: 800-223-1839

Phone: 502-895-2405

Fax: 502-899-2274

E-mail: info@xxxxxxx

Web site: http://www.aph.org

APH Shopping Home: http://shop.aph.org



///////////////////////////////////////////
Patterns: The Primary Braille Spelling and English Program

Posted: 16 Jun 2009 09:41 AM PDT
http://feedproxy.google.com/~r/FredsHeadCompanion/~3/FjnKVUUB6kU/patterns-primary-braille-spelling-and.html


Teach complete spelling and language skills to primary grade students who
will use braille as their main writing medium with this companion program
to Patterns: Reading Program.


Patterns: Spelling and English is composed of textbooks, posttests,
worksheets, and teacher's editions in print and braille. When used with the
Reading Program, it provides a whole language approach to teaching.
Addresses the problems of braille users who must master the braille code as
well as learn to communicate in print.


Level A corresponds to the Kindergarten, Preprimer, and Primer Levels of
Patterns: Reading.

Level B corresponds with the First Reader Level of Patterns: Reading.

Level C corresponds to the Second Reader Level of Patterns: Reading.

Level D corresponds with the Third Reader Level of Patterns: Reading.


Spelling and English: Level A (Green Lettering):

Print Teacher's Kit, Level A (complete kit):

Catalog Number: 6-78362-00



Braille Teacher's Kit, Level A (complete kit):

Catalog Number: 6-78363-00



Level A items sold separately:



Texts, Level A (braille only, 3 titles in one volume): all the words you
can write and spell, All about me, All Around City and Farm:

Catalog Number: 6-78366-00



Print Teacher's Edition, Level A:

Catalog Number: 8-78364-00



Braille Teacher's Edition, Level A (9 volumes):

Catalog Number: 6-78365-00



Worksheets, Level A (braille only, unbound):

Catalog Number: 6-78367-00



Posttest, Level A (braille only, 1 vol.):

Catalog Number: 6-78370-00



Posttest, Print Teacher's Edition, Level A:

Catalog Number: 8-78368-00



Posttest, Braille Teacher's Edition, Level A:

Catalog Number: 6-78369-00

Click this link to purchase Patterns: Primary Braille Spelling and English
Program: Level A.

Spelling and English: Level B (Purple Lettering):

Print Teacher's Kit, Level B (complete kit):

Catalog Number: 6-78371-00



Braille Teacher's Kit, Level B (complete kit):

Catalog Number: 6-78372-00



Level B items sold separately:



Text, Level B (braille only, 2 vol.): Building Blocks

Catalog Number: 6-78375-00



Print Teacher's Edition, Level B:

Catalog Number: 8-78373-00





Braille Teacher's Edition, Level B (8 vol.):

Catalog Number: 6-78374-00



Worksheets, Level B (braille only, unbound):

Catalog Number: 6-78376-00



Posttest, Level B (braille only, 1 vol.):

Catalog Number: 6-78379-00



Posttest, Print Teacher's Edition, Level B:

Catalog Number: 8-78377-00



Posttest, Braille Teacher's Edition, Level B (1 vol.):

Catalog Number: 6-78378-00

Click this link to purchase Patterns: Primary Braille Spelling and English
Program: Level B.

Spelling and English: Level C (Blue Lettering):

Print Teacher's Kit, Level C (complete kit):

Catalog Number: 6-78380-00



Braille Teacher's Kit, Level C (complete kit):

Catalog Number: 6-78381-00



Level C items sold separately



Text, Level C (braille only, 2 vol.): Communicating:

Catalog Number: 6-78384-00



Print Teacher's Edition, Level C:

Catalog Number: 8-78382-00



Braille Teacher's Edition, Level C (8 vol.):

Catalog Number: 6-78383-00



Worksheets, Level C (braille only, unbound):

Catalog Number: 6-78385-00



Posttest, Level C (braille only, 1 vol.):

Catalog Number: 6-78388-00



Posttest, Print Teacher's Edition, Level C:

Catalog Number: 8-78386-00



Posttest, Braille Teacher's Edition, Level C (1 vol.):

Catalog Number: 6-78387-00

Click this link to purchase Patterns: Primary Braille Spelling and English
Program: Level C.

Spelling and English: Level D (Red Lettering):

Print Teacher's Kit, Level D (complete kit):

Catalog Number: 6-78389-00



Braille Teacher's Kit, Level D (complete kit):

Catalog Number: 6-78390-00



Level D items sold separately:



Text and Glossary, Level D (braille only): Digging Deeper:

Catalog Number: 6-78393-00



Print Teacher's Edition, Level D:

Catalog Number: 8-78391-00



Braille Teacher's Edition, Level D:

Catalog Number: 6-78392-00


Worksheets, Level D (braille only): 6-78394-00 -- $30.00
Posttest, Level D (braille only):

Catalog Number: 6-78397-00


Posttest, Print Teacher's Edition, Level D: 8-78395-00 -- $6.00
Posttest, Braille Teacher's Edition, Level D:

Catalog Number: 6-78396-00

Click this link to purchase Patterns: Primary Braille Spelling and English
Program: Level D.

American Printing House for the Blind, Inc.

1839 Frankfort Avenue

Mailing Address: P.O. Box 6085

Louisville, Kentucky 40206-0085

Toll Free: 800-223-1839

Phone: 502-895-2405

Fax: 502-899-2274

E-mail: info@xxxxxxx

Web site: http://www.aph.org

APH Shopping Home: http://shop.aph.org



///////////////////////////////////////////
Patterns: Reading Program Library Series

Posted: 16 Jun 2009 08:33 AM PDT
http://feedproxy.google.com/~r/FredsHeadCompanion/~3/Tz8cxRkZjrg/patterns-reading-program-library-series.html


This series is designed for students who have completed the corresponding
levels of Patterns: Reading Program.



Library Series Preprimer Level (Blue): Complete Kit (24 braille books):

Catalog Number: 6-78300-00

Click this link to purchase Patterns: Reading Program Library Series:
Preprimer Level (Blue) Complete Kit.



Library Series Primer Level (Green): Complete Kit (27 braille books):

Catalog Number: 6-78310-00

Click this link to purchase Patterns: Reading Program Library Series:
Primer Level (Green) Complete Kit.



Library Series First Reader Level (Yellow): Complete Kit (23 braille books):

Catalog Number: 6-78320-00

Click this link to purchase Patterns: Reading Program Library Series: 1st
Reader Level (Yellow) Complete Kit.



Library Series Second Reader Level (Brown): Complete Kit (23 braille books):

Catalog Number: 6-78330-00

Click this link to purchase Patterns: Reading Program Library Series: 2nd
Reader Level (Brown) Complete Kit.



Optional Items:



Print Edition of Preprimer Pupil's Books (contains the print text for the
above 24 books): 8-78301-00



Print Edition of Primer Pupil Books (contains the print text for the above
27 books): 8-78302-00



Replacement Items:



Preprimer Level Notes for Teachers:

Catalog Number: 8-78300-00



Primer Level Notes for Teachers:

Catalog Number: 8-78310-00



Library Series First Reader Notes for Teachers:

Catalog Number: 8-78320-00


Library Series Second Reader Notes for Teachers: 8-78330-00 -- $6.00
Library Series Third Reader Notes for Teachers:

Catalog Number: 8-78340-00



American Printing House for the Blind, Inc.

1839 Frankfort Avenue

Mailing Address: P.O. Box 6085

Louisville, Kentucky 40206-0085

Toll Free: 800-223-1839

Phone: 502-895-2405

Fax: 502-899-2274

E-mail: info@xxxxxxx

Web site: http://www.aph.org

APH Shopping Home: http://shop.aph.org



///////////////////////////////////////////
How to Tie a Necktie and Keep It Out of Your Food

Posted: 16 Jun 2009 06:31 AM PDT
http://feedproxy.google.com/~r/FredsHeadCompanion/~3/6MdqY8b1SD4/how-to-tie-necktie-and-keep-it-out-of.html


There comes a day in every man's life when he has to step out of his jeans
and t-shirt and into a suit and tie. Whatever the occasion that's brought
you to this historic moment, you may feel a little tied up in knots over
the mechanics of tying a necktie. It's really quite easy. All you're
lacking is experience and the only way to gain experience is to take the
matter in hand.


So let's start by learning the four classic knots. They are the
Four-in-Hand, Windsor, Half-Windsor and Bow-Tie knot. If you're pressed for
time as you're reading this article and need to know one knot in a hurry,
choose the Four-in-Hand. It's the simplest of the bunch.


The Four in Hand:
It's simple. It's stylish. And it can be tied in seven simple motions.


Flip up your shirt collar, button the collar button, and drape the tie
around your neck. Let the wide end of the tie hang down your right side (on
the left if you are left-handed) with the tie's back -- the part with the
seam and stitching--against your chest. Pull down on the wide end of the
tie until the tip of the narrow end falls level with fourth shirt button
counting down from your collar (it's the button just above your navel).
This will help you achieve a pleasing length when the knot is tied.

Cross the wide end (from here onward called "A") over the narrow end ("B").

Fold A over and under B. The seam of A should now be pointing away from
your body.

Bring A over B again.

Pull A up and through the loop around your neck.

With a free finger, feel for the knot that the cross-overs have created.
Loosen the front of the knot with your index finger and bring A down
through this secondary loop.

Remove your finger and tighten the knot by holding B and sliding the knot
up to your collar.

Flip your shirt collar down and check the hang of the tie: Does it feel
like it is falling straight down your chest and abdomen or does it curl in
a little? If it curls or twists, turn the knot until the tie lays flat.
Finally, check the length. The tip should rest at the top-edge of your
waistband. If it falls far short or long of this mark, untie the knot and
try again.


The Four-in-Hand knot will suffice for most any need. Yet there are a few
other knots you may want to try depending on your mood and the occasion.
The Windsor and Half-Windsor knots are considered the mark of high-style,
though both have fallen out of fashion (the finished knot is quite large in
comparison to the Four-in-Hand). Due to the size of the finished knots,
you'll want to save the Windsors for use with your silk neckties (use the
Four-in-Hand knot with silk, woolen and knit ties).


The Windsor:
For supreme sophistication. This is the knot made famous by the Duke of
Windsor. Looks best when worn with a shirt with a spread collar.


Flip up your shirt collar, button the collar button, and drape the tie
around your neck.The tie's back -- the side with the seam and
stitching--should face your chest.

  Moving from left to right, cross the wide end of the tie (A) over the
narrow end  (B).

Bring A up through the loop between the collar and tie and let it fall down
and over this loop.

Moving from right to left, fold A over B and continue (from outside in) up
and over the loop. The tie's back will be facing away from you.

Bring A across the front from left to right.

Bring A up through the loop and let it fall over the loop. The tie's back
is facing you.

Loosen the front of the knot with your index finger and bring A down
through the knot in front.

Using both hands--one to slide the knot upward, the other to gently pull
down on B--tighten and adjust the knot until it's snug in the collar and
the tie falls flat against your chest.



The Half-Windsor:
Though minus one twist and turn, this modified Windsor is still a handful.


Flip up your shirt collar, button the collar button, and drape the tie
around your neck.The tie's back -- the side with the seam and
stitching--should face your chest.

Cross the wide end of the tie ("A") over the narrow end ("B").

Bring A around and behind B so that the tie's back is facing away from you.

Bring A up and down over the loop--the tie back is again facing away from
you.

Cross A over B from left to right.

Bring A up through the loop.

Bring A down through the knot in front.

Use both hands to tighten and adjust the knot until it's snug in the collar
and the tie falls flat.



Bow-tie:
Bow-ties are most often associated with pleated shirts, tuxedo and tails.
But a well-tied bow-tie can offer a playful break from the norm. The most
noticeable difference between a bow-tie and standard necktie is the
former's shape. The bow-tie has a thin band of material with two identical
tips. Moving out from the middle of the tie, the material widens to a
bulb-like shape for about two inches
and then narrows again for the last inch.


Want to make a statement? Here are the steps for tying a bow-tie. It gets
tricky at Step 4. But after you've mastered this knot, you'll have earned a
well-deserved bow.


Drape the bow-tie around your neck so that the left end (A) is longer than
the right (B).

Cross A, left to right, over B.

Bring A up and through the loop.

Double B over itself. Do this by folding B in half at the mid-point of
wide "bulb." The cut-end of B is pointing to your right.

Let A fall over the loop and folded end of B you're holding.

Holding everything in place, fold A over itself. Its tailored end should be
pointing left. Slide folded A through the smaller loop behind the folded B.
You'll have to be persistent at finding that inner loop.

Adjust the tie by gentle tugging at the tailored ends of A and B and by
straightening the center knot.


Is Wider Better?
Is the tie you're thinking of buying going to be in style years or even
months from now? It's a fair question. To play it safe, purchase ties that
are around 3  inches wide. As far as length, most standard neckties are
from 52 to 58 inches long. The length of the tie you'll need depends on
your height and whether you'll be using a Windsor knot which requires more
material to tie than, say, a Four-in-Hand. Now comes the question of style,
color and pattern.

The choice, of course, is all your own. Many men choose ties based on the
type of environment in which they work. For conservative office
environments (such  as a bank, law firm or insurance agency) you'll
probably want a tie with more muted colors and a less flashy design. You
may also want to choose a tie with more conservative colors and patterns to
wear to more formal occassions, such as weddings and funerals.

If you're looking for a tie to wear for an occasional night out on the
town, or in a more relaxed office environment, choose a tie that matches
your unique personality and style.

Ready to Buy a Tie?
You'll find ties at any shopping mall, men's store and even on some online
retailers. If you have concerns about the pattern, colors or style of a
specific tie, ask a sighted friend to accompany you on your tie-shopping
excursion. Or ask the store clerk for advice--most will be more than happy
to help.


A top-quality silk tie can cost hundreds of dollars. Lesser quality but
functional ties can be had for as little as $10.


Here are some tips from Tieguys.com , an on-line retailer, to help you
determine whether the tie you're about to buy is a good deal or not.



Is there a Bar Tack? On the seam-side of the tie, feel around the area
where the two sides join together to form an inverted V. Most quality ties
have a stitch joining the back flaps. This is called the bar tack, and it
helps the tie maintain its shape.


Is there a Slip Stitch? If you can, open up the tie as far as possible and
feel for a single, long thread. This thread is called the slip stitch and
gives added resilience to the tie. The fact that the tie can move along
this thread means that it won't rip when it's being wrapped tightly around
your neck, and that it will, when removed, return to its original shape.
Pull the slip stitch, and the tie should gather. In all likelihood, if you
find a a slip stitch, you've found a quality tie.


Are there three pieces of fabric? Take the tie in your hand and run your
finger down its length. You should find three separate pieces of fabric
stitched together, not two, as with most commercial ties. This construction
is used to help the tie conform easily to the neck.




The Care and Feeding of your Cravat:
A quality tie is an investment. Follow these simple suggestions for keeping
your ties in mint condition.


First, when removing your tie, don't just yank the tie from its knot.
Loosen the knot and remove the tie by reversing the steps you followed when
tying it. This creates opposite tension and can help ease out any creases
you may have created in the fabric when you tied the knot. If your tie is
heavily creased, line up the two tips and roll the tie around your finger.
Slip it off your finger and let it sit rolled up over night. Hang the tie
up in the morning and the creases should disappear.


Send your ties to the dry-cleaners only if you're in a pinch to have a
difficult stain removed. The chemicals and pressing used in dry cleaning
can damage the tie's fibers and luster. Most water spots can be removed
simply by daubing the tie with a napkin or soft cloth.


Here are some sites that show you how to tie a necktie with style.  Knots
such as the Windsor, Half Windsor, Pratt, Four in Hand and Bow tie.  You
can also learn the history of ties and how to keep your ties clean!




http://www.mckinnonsc.vic.edu.au/school/ties/ties.htm

http://www.tie-a-tie.net

http://www.scoutdb.org/h2tat/

http://jobsearch.about.com/cs/interviews/a/tieatie.htm

http://www.tieguys.com/information/tie-tie.shtml

http://www.askmen.com/fashion/how_to/11_how_to.html

http://www.tieking.com.au/category21_1.htm

http://www.tieanecktie.com

http://www.boardroomties.com/how-to-tie-a-tie.html
http://www.krawattenknoten.info/kra...en/tieknot.html


Keep Your Tie Out of Your Food


Now that you've tied your tie, let me share another tip with you. Are you
tired of your neck tie falling into your food or blowing up into your face
during windy weather? Look no further! These100% Silk Neckties are known
for their "Patent Pending" modified designer label in which they have
incorporated button-holes into the weaving process during the manufacturing
of their 100% Silk Custom Neckties (Printed and Woven). This allows the
wearer an easy way to attach a quality silk tie to a button on their shirt.


Ingenious. I have been known to solve this problem with a piece of Scotch
tape formed into a loop. Click this link to visit the ConformaTies web
site: http://www.conformaties.com/StoreFront.bok.



///////////////////////////////////////////
USB Guitar and Lessons

Posted: 16 Jun 2009 06:18 AM PDT
http://feedproxy.google.com/~r/FredsHeadCompanion/~3/DwtasFNm1yQ/usb-guitar.html


This instrument might look like a top-notch electric guitar featuring a
maple neck, solid body, single-coil pickups with 5-way switching, chrome
machine heads and a vintage whammy bar - and that's because it is. But it's
also an ingenious USB-friendly axe that allows you to transform your
computer into an amp, effects rack and recording system without any
additional hardware.


This Strat-style guitar comes with software that lets you jam along with
your favourite music files. You can even slow tracks down or speed them up
for learning and practising - ideal if you're into shredding metal or
plodding pop. There's also a multi-track recording/editing function, so you
can record your wicked riffing, two-handed tap-offs and sweeping arpeggios
(or something like that) on the spot. NOTE: This software has not been
tested with screen reading technology and may not be compatible with all
screen readers.


The included software can recreate countless combo sounds, from tube to
transistor, soft to distorted, warm to edgy. No wall of speakers or
mile-long pedal deck required. And if you're worried about the neighbours
(how very un-rock 'n' roll) you can listen to your plucking genius via
headphones. Can also be used with any traditional guitar amplifier.



Click this link to purchase the iAxe USB Guitar
from Firebox.com.

Guitar4Blind.com


OK, now that you have the USB Guitar, how are you going to learn to play
it? Through the internet, naturally!


This site is designed to teach visually impaired people guitar. It is
optimized to be accessed with the assistance of the JAWS for Windows Screen
Reading program and other screen readers. The site was developed by Bob
Craypoe in the US and tested by Terry Hopwood-Jackson in the UK.



Click this link to learn to play guitar:
http://www.craypoe.com/guitar/index.html.



///////////////////////////////////////////
Welcome Students to Battery University

Posted: 16 Jun 2009 06:04 AM PDT
http://feedproxy.google.com/~r/FredsHeadCompanion/~3/rnPzHdL71L4/welcome-students-to-battery-university.html


Almost all of us have either a cell phone, MP3 player, digital camera,
magnification device or notetaker. We usually don't give a lot of thought
to the batteries that run these devices. The batteries runs down, we plug
them into the wall, they recharge and we use them again until they run down
once more.


Did you know that there's a right way and a wrong way to recharge some
batteries? Not knowing how to properly charge batteries can dramatically
reduce the lifetime of your batteries,making your favorite device useless
within a few weeks.


To learn about rechargeable batteries and how to use them, head
to BatteryUniversity.com. It is a comprehensive web guide to rechargeable
batteries where you can learn the basics of battery types (nickel-cadmium,
lithium-ion etc), how they work and how to properly charge, discharge,
store and recycle each type to get the most out of them.



Click this link, class is starting at http://www.batteryuniversity.com.

This site is based on a book called Batteries in a Portable World.



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Thanks

Other related posts: