[bksvol-discuss] Re: scanning trade paperbacks

Well, if you are getting good scans from mass-market paperbacks, why spend money for the trades if you don't have to? I have gotten a scan or two that was pretty good with a mass-market paperback, but those were ones that I bought new. I have tried some I bought used though, and they were not so good. I haven't done any on K1000, yet, but with OSCAR and OpenBook, my general experience was that the mass-market ones did not come out as well as the trade versions or as well as hardcovers. But as I said, those were mostly used, and I have heard that the cheap paperbacks yellow as they age, which causes the print-quality to deteriorate. I think it has to do with not being printed on acid-free paper or something.

Besides, the last two hardcovers I got from Amazon resellers, the prices for the books were less than it cost to ship them - about six dollars in total for each. These were both books that came out earlier this year. So if I can get hardcovers at that price, I am going to buy them. On the other side, one good thing about paperbacks of all kinds is that you can get them totally flat; whereas with hardcovers, no matter how hard I try, I cannot seem to get them totally flat against the glass. After scanning three so far with K1000, and having the junk character issue I mentioned, I may consider paperbacks for future purchases, even with some of the excellent prices on hardcovers I have been getting lately.

----- Original Message ----- From: "Scott Blanks" <scottsjb@xxxxxxxxx>
To: <bksvol-discuss@xxxxxxxxxxxxx>
Sent: Sunday, September 03, 2006 9:22 PM
Subject: [bksvol-discuss] Re: scanning trade paperbacks



Hi Evan,

Yeah, the consensus seems to be that buying the trade editions new is the wiser purchase. I'll definitely keep that in mind. Curious though about one thing you said. When you say that the trades are of a higher quality, does that translate to when you scan the book, or are you strictly talking about the quality of the paper? Because, for the most part, the mass market books I've scanned have come out near perfect without any effort on my part to tweak scanning settings.

Scott


----- Original Message ----- From: "Evan Reese" <mentat1@xxxxxxxxxxxxxx>
To: <bksvol-discuss@xxxxxxxxxxxxx>
Sent: Sunday, September 03, 2006 9:03 PM
Subject: [bksvol-discuss] Re: scanning trade paperbacks



Scott, I have bought trade paperbacks new, but not used. I haven't encountered the spine shattering experience you mentioned. But I can see that older ones might do that if the glue dries out. I prefer buying them new trade paperbacks instead of mass-market paperbacks because they are of higher-quality than mass-market paperbacks.

----- Original Message ----- From: "Scott Blanks" <scottsjb@xxxxxxxxx>
To: <bksvol-discuss@xxxxxxxxxxxxx>
Sent: Sunday, September 03, 2006 8:35 PM
Subject: [bksvol-discuss] scanning trade paperbacks



Hey everyone,

Hope you've all enjoyed a restful Labor Day weekend so far. I want to know people's experiences scanning trade paperbacks. Just in case you aren't familiar with the term, these are the larger and more expensive paperbacks. About a year and a half ago, when I was just really getting into scanning for Bookshare, I purchased a paperback off Amazon. I did this not knowing one paperback from another, just assuming that I would have more luck with one of these than a hardcover book, and also of course not wanting to pay the extra bucks for a hardbound book. Well, when the novel arrived on my doorstep, I found that when opened, and with spine bent back, the book was too large for my scanner. Since I hate the idea of scanning one page at a time when I can use my scanning software to conquer two at a pop, the book has sat untouched all this time. I should send it to Bookshare, but my abilities of procrastination are often legendary.

Now, yesterday I was in a used bookstore and found a trade paperback that looked smaller than my first attempt. Excitedly, I took it home, and wanting to confirm my guess, I began to bend the book back. The spine promptly broke. Yes, broke. The book is literally in two pieces now, and I think that keeping it together enough for scanning might be tedious. Yes, I know this all sounds picky, but I've been spoiled by the mass market paperbacks. They can be bent open enough so you don't even have to hold the book down on the scanner, and they are never too big.

So, I suppose the questions I'm leading up to are: Do you all tend to use the trade paperbacks? Are my experiences unique, or is this fairly typical? Being able to scan the trades would open up a lot more possibilities for scannning. If you scan the trades, how do you flatten out the book without shattering the spine? Or again, was that occurrence more singular than common?

Thanks,
Scott


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