[bksvol-discuss] Re: proofreading questions

Hi Cindy,
Thanks so much for the explanation. When I was proofing a book that had this in it, using JAWS, every time one of these appeared, it sounded as if there was a question mark there. It drove me crazy, and I really loved the book! As I cursored through the word (instead of reading it) the character after the letter did not sound with JAWS. That's how I knew that it wasn't American English. I figured that the OCR did it because there was a different font wich the software didn't know how to handle. Anyway, it was easy to fix. With a phrase like "John's house' for example, I would copy the letter n and then the non-sounding character, put it in the find and replace's find, then put the normal apostrophe and letter n in the replace box. That would take care of all the n's in my file. Have a great day!
Marty

-----Original Message----- From: Cindy
Sent: Friday, July 27, 2012 9:50 PM
To: bksvol-discuss@xxxxxxxxxxxxx
Subject: [bksvol-discuss] Re: proofreading questions

Marty, the penultimate is the net-to-last (I didn't know what it was either until my husband used it and explained to me. For example, the letter Y is the penultimate letter of the alphabet. In John's case, the apostrophe that should be between the letter n and the letter s is actually above the letter n. I know no of no way to change it except by deleting it where it is and placing it where it belongs, but I can't imagine that it's a big problem for readers, unless it is a problem for Braille readers or people who read by listening.






--- On Fri, 7/27/12, Martha Rafter <mlhr@xxxxxxx> wrote:

From: Martha Rafter <mlhr@xxxxxxx>
Subject: [bksvol-discuss] Re: proofreading questions
To: bksvol-discuss@xxxxxxxxxxxxx
Date: Friday, July 27, 2012, 10:10 AM
Hi John,
  I'm not really sure about the term penultimate, but
following this thread reminds me of something I came across
a while ago.  While proofing I kept coming across
something that was not American English in a book that was
written in American english.  To me with my JAWS, the
word sounded as if there was a question mark after it.
Anyway, this is what I did:
  As I came across each of these characters, I copied
them, then opened 'find and replace,' pasted the character
in the find box and put what I knew it was supposed to be in
the replace.  I then did a 'replace all.'  I did
this in my initial read-through each time I found one.
I sure hope that this makes sense.  If it doesn't, ask
again and I will try again.
Marty

-----Original Message----- From: Cindy
Sent: Thursday, July 26, 2012 11:18 PM
To: bksvol-discuss@xxxxxxxxxxxxx
Subject: [bksvol-discuss] Re: proofreading questions

I wonder if it's necessary to re-place that apostrophe that
is over the penultimate letter rather than after it, where
it belongs. That is something someone who listens or uses
Braille to rad will have to say; to a sighted person it's
very clear what it is.
Cindy



--- On Thu, 7/26/12, Judy s. <cherryjam@xxxxxxxxxxxxxxxx>
wrote:

From: Judy s. <cherryjam@xxxxxxxxxxxxxxxx>
Subject: [bksvol-discuss] Re: proofreading questions
To: bksvol-discuss@xxxxxxxxxxxxx
Date: Thursday, July 26, 2012, 6:03 PM






   Hi John,



   I can answer the bit about
books.google.com. It's unlikely that you
   would want to change your page breaks in
the  scanned version .rtf
   to match the Google copy.  Your
edition is probably a totally
   different edition than the one that is on
google books.  I run into
   this all the time. Books can have 20 or 30
different editions, or
   even more, and the pagination will be
different on each edition.



   The missing dash problem could have from a
whole bunch of causes.  I
   don't have a fix for you as a proofreader
to handle that easily,
   unless there is a specific consistent
pattern you can use to do a
   'search and replace' for the missing em
dashes. One idea from the
   pattern you are seeing  is to just do
a search for space space and
   then replace each of these that appear to
be a missing em dash with
   a hyphen hypen, Someone else here may have
a better idea, though.



   I'm also a sighted volunteer with
limitations that don't allow me to
   manipulate a print book. There are a few
of us in that boat that are
   volunteers here.  I use google book
and amazon peek both when
   available, and when I can't get an answer
I need there or from the
   person who scanned the book I ask on the
list if someone can find
   the book and scan the page and send it to
me.



   Hope that helps,



   Judy s.



   On 7/26/2012 7:06 PM, John Simpson
     wrote:










       I have several questions
about the book that I am

   currently proofing.
             First
off, words that are followed by an "'s" have the

   apostrsphe
             over
the penultimate letter (e.g. Martin̓s). While this is
             not a
showstopper,
             it does
require a fair amount of corrections. I guess my

   question is what
             causes
this kind of construction? Is it a function of the
             scan
volunteer, the
             scanner
hardware, or the OCR software?

       Secondly, I have gone to
books.google.com to take
             a look
at this book.
             My
question here is whether Google has a fair

   representation of the book. I
             know
that all but one page are present, but within the
             first
several chapters,
             the
page breaks in the scanned version .rtf are not in the
             same
place as they
             are in
Google's copy. I certainly don't want to have to go
             through
the entire
             book
changing pagination based on Google. I do have a hold
             at my
local library
             for the
print copy that will help answer this question.
             Any
other advice would
             be
greatly appreciated.

       The third question is that
in the scanned version
             that I
have from

   BookShare there are frequent instances of
two spaces,
             rather
than one. The
             sense
of the book is that there should be a comma where
             the
first space is.

   However, when looking at the Google
version, this

   separator is an m dash

   surrounded by spaces.  All of these
dashes have been

   removed. Again, my

   question is whether this is a function of
the scan

   volunteer the scanner

   hardware or the OCR software. Again, I do
not wish to go
             through
the entire
             print
book looking for dashes that I need to replace, or
             even to
do a find on
             two
spaces and see if the meeting indicates a dash.

       I am a sighted volunteer
with physical limitations
             that do
not allow me
             to
manipulate a print book. While I don't mind getting

   occasional assistance to
             go to a
specific page to verify my proofreading, I'm not
             able to
scan a print
             book
and compare my scan to the BookShare .rtf version.
             If the
Google

   representation is accurate relative to the
print book, I
             will be
happy to use that
             as a
resource wherever possible.

       Thanks for any and all
suggestions.

       John Simpson











To unsubscribe from this list send a blank Email to
bksvol-discuss-request@xxxxxxxxxxxxx
put the word 'unsubscribe' by itself in the subject
line.  To get a list of available commands, put the
word 'help' by itself in the subject line.

To unsubscribe from this list send a blank Email to
bksvol-discuss-request@xxxxxxxxxxxxx
put the word 'unsubscribe' by itself in the subject
line.  To get a list of available commands, put the
word 'help' by itself in the subject line.


To unsubscribe from this list send a blank Email to
bksvol-discuss-request@xxxxxxxxxxxxx
put the word 'unsubscribe' by itself in the subject line. To get a list of available commands, put the word 'help' by itself in the subject line.

To unsubscribe from this list send a blank Email to
bksvol-discuss-request@xxxxxxxxxxxxx
put the word 'unsubscribe' by itself in the subject line.  To get a list of 
available commands, put the word 'help' by itself in the subject line.

Other related posts: