[bksvol-discuss] The Catcher in the Rye

You know, after reading this book for the second time, as a college 
graduate, smile, I still am not too impressed with it.

Guess it is just one of those books that I just won't like.

Shelley L. Rhodes and Judson, guiding golden
juddysbuddy@xxxxxxxxxxxx
Guide Dogs For the Blind Inc.
Graduate Advisory Council
www.guidedogs.com

The vision must be followed by the venture. It is not enough to
stare up the steps - we must step up the stairs.

      -- Vance Havner
----- Original Message ----- 
From: "Shelley L. Rhodes" <juddysbuddy@xxxxxxxxxxxx>
To: <bksvol-discuss@xxxxxxxxxxxxx>
Cc: <bookshare-discuss@xxxxxxxxxxxxx>
Sent: Tuesday, April 12, 2005 11:38 PM
Subject: [bksvol-discuss] Replacement submitted


Replacement for
The Catcher in the Rye
by J.D. Salinger

This is a revamped replacement copy for the one in the collection.

The validator should note, that there is a new long synopsis, but the old
short one works, and that this book SHOULD not be marked adult as it is used
in many high school literature courses, and since high schoolers can't see
adult marked books, well you see my logic.

From the Book Jacket:
Anyone who has read J. D. Salinger's New Yorker stories - particularly A
Perfect Day for Bananafish, Uncle Wiggily in Connecticut, The Laughing Man,
and For Esme - With Love and Squalor, will not be surprised by the fact that
his first novel is full of children.

The hero-narrator of THE CATCHER IN THE RYE is an ancient child of sixteen,
a native New Yorker named Holden Caulfield. Through circumstances that tend
to preclude adult, secondhand description, he leaves his prep school in
Pennsylvania and goes underground in New York City for three days.

The boy himself is at once too simple and too complex for us to make any
final comment about him or his story. Perhaps the safest thing we can say
about Holden is that he was born in the world not just strongly attracted to
beauty but, almost, hopelessly impaled on it.

There are many voices in this novel: children's voices, adult voices,
underground voices-but Holden's voice is the
most eloquent of all. Transcending his own vernacular, yet remaining
marvelously faithful to it, he issues a perfectly articulated cry of mixed
pain and pleasure. However, like most lovers and clowns and poets of the
higher orders, he keeps most of the pain to, and for, himself. The pleasure
he gives away, or sets aside, with all his heart. It is there for the reader
who can handle it to keep.

J. D. Salinger was born in New York City in 1919 and attended Manhattan
public schools, a military academy in Pennsylvania and three colleges (no
degrees). "A happy tourist's year in Europe," he writes, "when I was
eighteen and nineteen. In the Army from '42 to '46, most of the time with
the Fourth Division.

"I've been writing since I was fifteen or so. My short stones have appeared
in a number of magazines over me last ten years, mostly - and most happily -
in The New Yorker. I worked on THE CATCHER IN THE RYE, on and off, for ten
years."

Shelley L. Rhodes and Judson, guiding golden
juddysbuddy@xxxxxxxxxxxx
Guide Dogs For the Blind Inc.
Graduate Advisory Council
www.guidedogs.com

The vision must be followed by the venture. It is not enough to
stare up the steps - we must step up the stairs.

      -- Vance Havner





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