[bksvol-discuss] Re: OK, gang, got a weird one!

I don't think it was universal. Germanic script, even though using a Roman
alphabet, was significantly different. English, even though it was a
Germanic language itself, used a Latinate script as a hangover from the Norman
conquest. Also, that s instead of an f was not really an s. It looked very
similar to an s and I imagine that might have something to do with it being
changed, but if you could see it you would be able to tell it from an s. I did
not make a habit of looking at antiquated English scripts before I lost my
eyesight, so I don't remember about the u and v, but I would suspect that that
u was not quite a u either. That could be settled, though, by someone with
eyesight just taking a look at it and telling us.

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[bksvol-discuss] Re: OK, gang, got a weird one!   
Date: 
7/13/2009 3:50:29 PM Eastern Daylight Time  
From: 
kimfri11@xxxxxxxxxxx  
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bksvol-discuss@xxxxxxxxxxxxx  
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Hi, gang, Just a comment from Kim here. During the seventeenth century, the
word "wave" would be spelled W-A-u-e. I also noticed that in the eighteenth
century, the letter S would be written with a letter F. Apparently what
happened with old Spanish affected Early modern English as well. H'mm! I wonder
if this orthography was universal throughout western Europe? Regards, Kim
aka Ellinder.

----------------------------------------------------------------------------
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From: bksvol-discuss-bounce@xxxxxxxxxxxxx
[mailto:bksvol-discuss-bounce@xxxxxxxxxxxxx] On Behalf Of Donna Goodin
Sent: Monday, July 13, 2009 11:09 AM
To: bksvol-discuss@xxxxxxxxxxxxx
Subject: [bksvol-discuss] OK, gang, got a weird one!

Hi all, 

I’m working on The Lady in Blue by Javier Sierra.  At the end of the book
is a document written in old Spanish.  Some of the “abnormalities” are
standard
orthographic conventions of the period, things like using the letter u
where in modern Spanish there would be a V.  others are the result of the font. 
So, for instance,  the letter S looks like an F.  This also is typical of
period texts.  My question: Should I correct/modernize it, or should I leave
it?  One option would be to correct font issues, but leave the period
orthography intact.   There is an English translation following the Spanish
text. 

I appreciate any input. 

Thanks,

Donna

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