[bksvol-discuss] Re: Interesting K1000 Problem

Thanks, Kellie, it definitely wasn't Spanish, French, German, Italian, 
Portuguese, or a few other languages which, while I don't speak them, I can 
usually recognize by the sound.  I have been on Earth so long now, that I can 
hardly remember my native language anymore, and perhaps the voice just didn't 
do it justice enough to jog my fading memories.

I decided, per Jake's suggestion, to try the ViaVoice, at least for reading, 
while using Kate for messages.  I agree that the inflection is strange, but I 
still like the sound of those voices.  I don't see an inflection adjustment in 
these settings, which - even though turning it down might make the voice 
flatter - might also make it a little less
odd-sounding.  Also, moving the pitch much outside the initial range of the 
source person makes it worse, and actually sounds more creepy.

  ----- Original Message ----- 
  From: Kellie Hartmann 
  To: bksvol-discuss@xxxxxxxxxxxxx 
  Sent: Tuesday, August 15, 2006 7:18 AM
  Subject: [bksvol-discuss] Re: Interesting K1000 Problem


  Hi Evan,
  Hmm, don't you recognize Vulcan when you hear it? Kurzweil is just trying to 
address you in your native tongue... <lol!>

  Seriously, I'm 99.9 percent sure that your problem with slowness is being 
caused by the Neospeak engine--Paul and Kate. The voices that take little 
pieces of recorded human speech and put them together are called concatenated 
speech, and they are extremely demanding of processor power and memory, so they 
may cause you to be using all your ram plus some of its cache. A friend and I 
once tried to do some research on this kind of speech and how it's made, and we 
discovered that in order to really grasp it you'd need one P.H.D. in 
linguistics and another in software engineering.  Between her IT certificate 
and my one semester of intro to linguistics we gleaned a vague idea of the 
process. <lol>

  So far I don't much care for the concatenated speech because of the extremely 
weird inflection. They sound like a real person, but like a really creepily 
strange real person. <lol> I'm being forced to adapt though--I have a Bible 
research program that speaks, and my choices for using it are Neospeech or 
Microsoft speech. I loathe MS Speech, referring to it as Microsoft sprak, 
(sprak is the Dutch word for speech, and pronounced correctly it sounds more 
like a Klingon expression of disgust than anything else.)

  So there's the boring linguistics lesson combined with personal rant for the 
day. Happy reading with whatever speech you prefer, not to mention braille, 
zoomtext, etc,
  Kellie

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