[astronews] IAAS Monthly Astronomy Newsletter

  • From: Burness Ansell <ki0ar@xxxxxxxxx>
  • To: Astronomy Newsletter <astronews@xxxxxxxxxxxxx>
  • Date: Sun, 31 Aug 2008 13:57:26 -0700 (PDT)

IAAS Monthly Astronomy Newsletter
September 2008

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The International Association for Astronomical Studies provides this newsletter 
as a service for interested persons in the Denver Metro area. The astronomical 
data presented here is not only useful in Colorado but in other parts of the 
world as well.

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This newsletter is published on the World Wide Web at 
http://www.ki0ar.com/astro.html - The Home of KI0AR - and is received 
nationally and internationally. A MS Word formatted downloadable version of the 
newsletter is at http://www.ki0ar.com/current_nl.doc.

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An Open Invitation - For amateur radio and scanner enthusiasts, when in the 
Denver metro area, please join the Colorado Astronomy Net on the Rocky Mountain 
Radio League (http://rmrl.hamradios.com/) repeater on a frequency of 146.94 MHz 
on Tuesday nights at 7 P.M. local time.

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Special Notice to Denver, CO area residents and visitors to the area: The 
Plains Conservation Center in Aurora hosts Full Moon Walks every month weather 
permitting on or near the night of the full Moon. Visit 
http://www.plainsconservationcenter.org for more information and directions.

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Excerpts from JPL mission updates are provided as a public service as part of 
the JPL Solar System Ambassador / NASA Outreach program.

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In This Newsletter...

* The Moon
* The Planets
* Astronomical Events
* Planetary/Lunar Exploration Missions
* Web Sites of Interest
* Acknowledgments and References
* Subscription Information

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New Feature - The Month At-A-Glance at http://www.ki0ar.com/ataglance.html 
I've added a link to a calendar displaying the daily astronomical events. 
Comments appreciated.

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The Moon

Phases:
* New Moon on the 29th.
* First Quarter Moon on the 7th.
* Full Moon on the 15th.
* Last Quarter Moon on the 22nd.

* Apogee on the 7th, 251,167 mi. from Earth.
* Perigee on the 19th, 229,215 mi. from Earth.

Moon/Planet Pairs:
* The Moon passes 5 deg. south of Venus on the 1st.
* The Moon passes 3 deg. south of Mercury on the 1st.
* The Moon passes 5 deg. south of Mars on the 2nd.
* The Moon passes 0.3 deg. south of Antares on the 6th.
* The Moon passes 3 deg. south of Jupiter on the 9th.
* Mercury passes 4 deg. south of Venus on the 11th.
* Venus passes 0.3 deg. north of Mars on the 11th.
* Mercury passes 3 deg. south of Mars on the 12th.
* The Moon passes 0.8 deg. north of Neptune on the 12th.
* The Moon passes 4 deg. north of Uranus on the 15th.
* Venus passes 3 deg. north of Spica on the 18th.
* Mercury passes 4 deg. south of Mars on the 19th.
* The Moon passes 1 deg. north of the Pleiades on the 19th.
* Mars passes 2 deg. north of Spica on the 23rd.
* The Moon passes 5 deg. south of Saturn on the 27th.
* The Moon passes 5 deg. south of Mars on the 30th.

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The Planets & Dwarf Planets
Planetary Reports generated by "TheSky" software. 
(http://www.ki0ar.com/planrpts.html) These reports provide predicted data for 
the planets for the first of each month for the current year. The rise and set 
times for the Sun and the Moon for each day of the month are also included in 
the reports.
(All times are local unless otherwise noted.)

* Planetary Highlights for September - Planets abound in the early twilight 
hours soon after sunset early in the month. Mercury and Mars make brief 
appearances and are in conjunction with Venus on the 11th. Jupiter still 
dominates the southern sky all evening and Uranus and Neptune rise as the inner 
planets set. The Earth reaches Autumnal equinox.

* Mercury - Is at greatest eastern elongation (27 deg. above the western 
horizon) on the 10th. Mercury sets at 8:23 p.m. on the 1st and about 6:48 p.m. 
by month's end. Look for Mercury low in the west soon after sunset. Mercury is 
in the constellation of Virgo shining at magnitude 0.2.

* Venus - Can be found low in the west soon after sunset. Keep an eye on Venus 
during the first 2 weeks of September as Venus, Mars and Mercury close in on 
each other for an interesting conjunction on the 11th. Venus sets at 8:28 p.m. 
on the 1st and about 7:56 p.m. by month's end. Venus is in the constellation of 
Virgo shining at magnitude -3.8.

* Earth - The Autumnal equinox occurs at 11:44 a.m. on the 22nd.

* Mars - Is still visible in the evening sky after sunset. Mars sets at 8:39 
p.m. on the 1st and about 7:28 p.m. by month's end. Mars is in the 
constellation of Virgo shining at magnitude 1.7.

* Jupiter - Can be found in the southern sky soon after sunset. Jupiter sets at 
1:53 a.m. on the 1st and about 11:53 p.m. by month's end. Jupiter is in the 
constellation of Sagittarius shining at magnitude -2.4.

* Saturn - Is in conjunction with the Sun on the 3rd. Saturn is not visible 
until late in the month when it returns to the morning sky. Saturn rises about 
4:59 a.m. by month's end. Saturn is in the constellation of Leo shining at 
magnitude 1.0 on the 30th.

* Uranus - Is at opposition on the 12th, rising as the Sun sets. Uranus is at 
its best and brightest for the year. Uranus rises at 7:53 p.m. on the 1st and 
about 4:39 p.m. by month's end. Uranus is in the constellation of Aquarius 
shining at magnitude 5.7.

* Neptune - Rises at 6:39 p.m. on the 1st and about 4:39 p.m. by month's end. 
Neptune is in the constellation of Capricornus shining at magnitude 7.8.

Dwarf Planets

* Ceres – Rises at 2:25 a.m. on the 1st and about 1:29 a.m. by month’s end. 
Ceres is in the constellation of Cancer shining at magnitude 8.8.

* Pluto - Sets at 1:13 a.m. on the 1st and about 11:11 p.m. by month's end. 
Pluto shines at magnitude 14.0 in the constellation of Sagittarius. As always, 
good luck at spotting this one, a large telescope and very dark skies will be 
needed.

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Astronomical Events

Meteor Showers
* No significant meteor shower activity this month, but you can expect to see 
from 1 to 4 meteors per hour early in the month.

* For more information about Meteor Showers, visit Gary Kronk's Meteor Showers 
Online web page at http://meteorshowersonline.com/.

Comets
* Comet C/2007 W1 (Boattini) is now visible from late evening through the rest 
of the night. Comet Boattini is located in the constellation of Pisces this 
month, but you'll need to view this comet under dark skies as the Moon will 
interfere with this 10th magnitude object.

* For information, orbital elements and ephemerides on observable comets visit 
the Observable Comets page from the Harvard-Smithsonian Center for Astrophysics 
(http://cfa-www.harvard.edu/iau/Ephemerides/Comets/index.html).

* For more information about Comets, visit Gary Kronk's Cometography.com web 
page at http://cometography.com/.

Eclipses
* No eclipse activity this month.

Occultations
* Information on various occultations can be found at 
http://lunar-occultations.com/iota/iotandx.htm , the International Occultation 
Timing Association's (IOTA) web site.

Asteroids (From west to east)
* Parthenope is in the constellation of Capricornus.
* Vesta is in the constellation of Cetus.
* Metis is in the constellation of Cetus.
* Pallas is in the constellation of Lepus.

* Information about the Minor Planets can be found at 
http://www.minorplanetobserver.com the Minor Planet Observer web site.

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Planetary/Lunar Exploration Missions
(Excerpts from recent mission updates)

* Cassini - August 14, 2008
Cassini Pinpoints Source of Jets on Saturn's Moon Enceladus

"PASADENA, Calif. -- In a feat of interplanetary sharpshooting, NASA's Cassini 
spacecraft has pinpointed precisely where the icy jets erupt from the surface 
of Saturn's geologically active moon Enceladus. 

New carefully targeted pictures reveal exquisite details in the prominent south 
polar "tiger stripe" fractures from which the jets emanate. The images show the 
fractures are about 300 meters (980 feet) deep, with V-shaped inner walls. The 
outer flanks of some of the fractures show extensive deposits of fine material. 
Finely fractured terrain littered with blocks of ice tens of meters in size and 
larger (the size of small houses) surround the fractures. 

"This is the mother lode for us," said Carolyn Porco, Cassini imaging team 
leader at the Space Science Institute, Boulder, Colo. "A place that may 
ultimately reveal just exactly what kind of environment -- habitable or not -- 
we have within this tortured little moon." 

One highly anticipated result of this flyby was finding the location within the 
fractures from which the jets blast icy particles, water vapor and trace 
organics into space. Scientists are now studying the nature and intensity of 
this process on Enceladus, and its effects on surrounding terrain. This 
information, coupled with observations by Cassini's other instruments, may 
answer the question of whether reservoirs of liquid water exist beneath the 
surface."

Cassini Imaging Team's website - http://ciclops.org.

For the latest mission status reports, visit 
http://saturn.jpl.nasa.gov/home/index.cfm. The speed and location of the 
spacecraft can be viewed on the "Present Position" web page.
(http://saturn.jpl.nasa.gov/operations/present-position.cfm)

* New Horizons - No new news since July 29, 2008
The PI's Perspective: Journeying Beyond Saturn

"As avid followers of New Horizons know, our spacecraft has been mostly 
hibernating since February, and will continue to so do until Sept. 2, when we 
will wake it to begin its second annual checkout. Many of you will also recall 
that New Horizons passed the orbit of Saturn in early June. New Horizons is the 
first spacecraft to venture this far (a billion kilometers from the Sun!) since 
the last of the Voyagers accomplished the same milestone in the summer of 1981. 
We are now nearly 96 million kilometers (60 million miles) beyond Saturn, and 
will cross the orbit of Uranus – about 2 billion kilometers from the Sun – in 
March 2011."

New Horizons gallery http://pluto.jhuapl.edu/gallery/sciencePhotos/.

For more information on the New Horizons mission - the first mission to the 
ninth planet - visit the New Horizons home page: http://pluto.jhuapl.edu/.

* Dawn - No new news since December 18, 2007
NASA's Dawn Spacecraft Begins Interplanetary Cruise Phase

"NASA's Dawn spacecraft has successfully completed the initial checkout phase 
of the mission and begun its interplanetary cruise phase, which is highlighted 
by nearly continuous thrusting of its ion propulsion system. Dawn is on an 
8-year, 3-billion mile journey to asteroid Vesta and dwarf planet Ceres."

For more information on the Dawn mission, visit the Dawn home page: 
http://www.nasa.gov/mission_pages/dawn/main/index.html.

* MESSENGER - August 4, 2008
Sharing the Wealth: MESSENGER Team Delivers Mercury Flyby 1 Data to Planetary 
Data System

"Data from MESSENGER’s first flyby of Mercury have been released to the public 
by the Planetary Data System (PDS), an organization that archives and 
distributes all of NASA’s planetary mission data.

“This delivery, while not the first for the MESSENGER mission, represents a 
significant milestone,” says MESSENGER Mission Archive Coordinator Alan Mick, 
of the Johns Hopkins University Applied Physics Laboratory. “We had delivered 
data from MESSENGER to the PDS before, but not Mercury data,” he says. “This 
delivery was particularly significant — the first MESSENGER flyby of Mercury 
was mankind’s return to this planet after an absence of over three decades. In 
this one flyby we imaged previously unseen areas of Mercury’s surface, greatly 
improved the resolution in areas already covered, and made observations of a 
kind that had never been made before.”

Calibrated data from three of the probe’s science instruments — the 
Magnetometer (MAG), the Mercury Atmospheric and Surface Composition 
Spectrometer (MASCS), and the Mercury Dual Imaging System (MDIS) — are included 
in this release. “The science results from these instruments have already shed 
light on questions about Mercury that have lingered for more than three 
decades,” says MESSENGER Project Scientist Ralph McNutt of APL."

For more information on the MESSENGER mission, visit the MESSENGER home page: 
http://messenger.jhuapl.edu/.

* Pack Your Backpack
Calling all explorers! Tour JPL with our new Virtual Field Trip site. Stops 
include Mission Control and the Rover Lab. Your guided tour starts when you 
select a "face" that will be yours throughout the visit. Cool space images and 
souvenirs are all included in your visit.
+ http://virtualfieldtrip.jpl.nasa.gov/ 
* Past, Present, Future and Proposed JPL Missions - 
http://www.jpl.nasa.gov/missions.

* For special JPL programs and presentations in your area visit the JPL Solar 
System Ambassador web site at http://www2.jpl.nasa.gov/ambassador/index.html.

Mars Missions

* Mars Odyssey Orbiter - No new news since March 20, 2008
NASA Mission Finds New Clues to Guide Search for Life on Mars

"PASADENA, Calif. - NASA's Mars Odyssey orbiter has found evidence of salt 
deposits. These deposits point to places where water once was abundant and 
where evidence might exist of possible Martian life from the Red Planet's past.

A team led by Mikki Osterloo of the University of Hawaii, Honolulu, found 
approximately 200 places on southern Mars that show spectral characteristics 
consistent with chloride minerals. Chloride is part of many types of salt, such 
as sodium chloride or table salt. The sites range from about a square kilometer 
(0.4 square mile) to 25 times that size."

"A simulated fly-through using the newly assembled imagery is available online 
at http://www.nasa.gov/mission_pages/mars/missions/odyssey/20060313.html.

The fly-through plus tools for wandering across and zooming into the large 
image are at http://themis.asu.edu/.";

MARS ODYSSEY THEMIS IMAGES
Thermal Emission Imaging System (THEMIS) web site: (http://themis.asu.edu/)

August 18-22, 2008

* Tempe Terra (Released 18 August 2008)
 http://themis.asu.edu/zoom-20080818a

* Dunes (Released 19 August 2008)
 http://themis.asu.edu/zoom-20080819a

* Lycus Sulci (Released 20 August 2008)
 http://themis.asu.edu/zoom-20080820a

* Polar Layers (Released 21 August 2008)
 http://themis.asu.edu/zoom-20080821a

* Polar Erg (Released 22 August 2008)
 http://themis.asu.edu/zoom-20080822a

All of the THEMIS images are archived here:
http://themis.la.asu.edu/latest.html 

The Odyssey data are available through a new online access system established 
by the Planetary Data System at: http://starbrite.jpl.nasa.gov/pds/ 

Visit the Mars Odyssey Mission page at 
http://mars.jpl.nasa.gov/odyssey/index.html.

* Mars Exploration Rover Mission (Spirit and Opportunity) -
August 14, 2008

Spirit Status: Waiting Out the Winter - sol 1628-1634, August 01-07, 2008

"Spirit's battery levels are slowly edging upward, thanks to a slight decrease 
in atmospheric dust (Tau) and a gradual increase in sunlight as winter gives 
way to spring.

Early in the week, Spirit spent two Martian days carrying out contingency plans 
following a temporary delay in data transmission from Earth. Spirit implemented 
the so-called "runout" portion of an earlier master sequence on sols 1628 and 
1629 (Aug. 1-2, 2008). Subsequent relays of new instructions from Earth on sols 
1629 and 1632 (Aug. 2 and Aug. 5, 2008) went off without a hitch.

Spirit remains healthy, with all subsystems performing as expected as of sol 
1630 (Aug. 3, 2008)."

Opportunity Status: Opportunity Eyes Challenges Ahead - sol 1614-1620, August 
8-14, 2008

"Opportunity faces several challenges on the way out of "Victoria Crater" but 
continues to make steady progress. The first of these is a traverse of 
approximately 10 meters (30 feet, a little longer than a double-decker bus) 
across a sandy, 17-degree slope. Opportunity is more than halfway through that 
part of the journey. The next is a drive across 30 to 50 meters (100 to 160 
feet), depending on the route taken, of rocky outcrop. The final leg of the 
climb will require Opportunity to cross the ripple surrounding the alcove known 
as "Duck Bay."

Because Opportunity is facing the threat of a drive-motor failure on the left 
front wheel, the engineering team has been working on pseudo-"Mars time" for 
the past week to take advantage of extra drive opportunities.

Opportunity remains healthy, with all subsystems performing as expected as of 
the downlink of information from NASA's Odyssey orbiter on sol 1620 (Aug. 14, 
2008)."

Landing sites link - http://marsoweb.nas.nasa.gov/landingsites/ 
Visit the Mars Exploration Rover page at
 http://marsrovers.jpl.nasa.gov/home/index.html.

* Mars Reconnaissance Orbiter Mission - No new news since July 16, 2008
NASA Spacecraft Shows Diverse, Wet Environments on Ancient Mars

"WASHINGTON -- Two studies based on data from NASA's Mars Reconnaissance 
Orbiter have revealed that the Red Planet once hosted vast lakes, flowing 
rivers and a variety of other wet environments that had the potential to 
support life. 

One study, published in the July 17 issue of Nature, shows that vast regions of 
the ancient highlands of Mars, which cover about half the planet, contain clay 
minerals, which can form only in the presence of water. Volcanic lavas buried 
the clay-rich regions during subsequent, drier periods of the planet's history, 
but impact craters later exposed them at thousands of locations across Mars. 
The data for the study derives from images taken by the Compact Reconnaissance 
Imaging Spectrometer for Mars, or CRISM, and other instruments on the orbiter. 

"The big surprise from these new results is how pervasive and long-lasting 
Mars' water was, and how diverse the wet environments were," said Scott 
Murchie, CRISM principal investigator at the Johns Hopkins University Applied 
Physics Laboratory in Laurel, Md."

MARS RECONNAISSANCE ORBITER HIRISE IMAGES
August 20, 2008

* Gullies and Bedrock Exposures in Impact Crater Wall
 http://hirise.lpl.arizona.edu/PSP_009155_1480

* Fresh Double-Layered Ejecta Crater 
 http://hirise.lpl.arizona.edu/PSP_009160_2350

* Cratered Cones in Isidis Planitia 
 http://hirise.lpl.arizona.edu/PSP_009177_1985

* Eroding Dunes in Chasma Boreale
 http://hirise.lpl.arizona.edu/PSP_009114_2645

All of the HiRISE images are archived here:
http://hirise.lpl.arizona.edu/.


More information about the MRO mission is available online at 
http://www.nasa.gov/mro.

* Phoenix Mars Lander Mission - August 29, 2008
NASA Phoenix Mission Conducting Extended Activities on Mars

"TUCSON, Ariz. -- NASA's Phoenix Mars Lander, having completed its 90-day 
primary mission, is continuing its science collection activities. Science and 
engineering teams are looking forward to at least another month of Martian 
exploration.

Due to the spacecraft's sufficient power and experiment capacity, NASA 
announced on July 31 that the mission would continue operations through Sept. 
30. Once the lander finishes collecting science data, the mission teams will 
continue the analysis of the measurements and observations.

"We have been successful beyond my wildest dreams, and we're not done yet 
learning from Mars about its secrets," said Peter Smith, Phoenix principal 
investigator from the University of Arizona, Tucson.

"We are still working to understand the properties and the history of the ice 
at our landing site on the northern plains of Mars. While the sun has begun to 
dip below the horizon, we still have power to continue our observations and 
experiments. And we're hoping to see a gradual change in the Martian weather in 
the next few weeks," he said."

Visit the Phoenix Mars Lander Mission pages at 
http://www.nasa.gov/mission_pages/phoenix/main/index.html.

* Mars Missions Status - New Mars missions are being planned to include several 
new rover and sample collection missions. Check out the Mars Missions web page: 
http://mars.jpl.nasa.gov/missions/ and the Mars Exploration page: 
http://marsprogram.jpl.nasa.gov/ 

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Links and Other Space News
(If you have a link you would like to recommend to our readers, please feel 
free to submit it.)

 

* "TheSky" Software - http://www.bisque.com 

* A Short Guide to Celestial Navigation - http://www.celnav.de/ 

* Astrogirl Homepage - http://www.astrogirl.org 

* Astronomical Lexicon - http://www.ki0ar.com/astrolex.html 
Many of the astronomical terms used in this newsletter are defined here.

* Astronomy Picture of the Day - http://antwrp.gsfc.nasa.gov/apod/astropix.html 

* Celestron Telescopes - http://www.celestron.com/c2/index.php - New beta 
website

* Cloudbait Observatory, Guffey Colorado - http://www.cloudbait.com - Submit 
your fireball reports here. Interesting, knowledgeable site.

* The Constellations and Their Stars - 
http://www.astro.wisc.edu/~dolan/constellations/constellations.html 
Good site for finding out more about the 88 constellations and their associated 
stars.

* Denver Astronomical Society - http://www.denverastrosociety.org 

* Distant Suns - http://www.distantsuns.com/ 
Desktop Astronomy package for PCs.

* Eric's Black Sun Eclipse website -
http://www.ericsblacksuneclipse.com 

* Groovy Adventures - http://www.groovyadventures.com 
Unique adventures and vacations including astronomy related vacations.

* JPL Solar System Ambassador Program -
http://www.jpl.nasa.gov/ambassador/front.html

* JPL Solar System - http://www.jpl.nasa.gov/solar_system/ 

* Meade Advanced Products Users Group - http://www.mapug-astronomy.net/ - 
Mapug-Astronomy Topical Archive & information resource, containing a massive 
335 page archive of discussions about Meade equipment, and much more: 
observatories, observing lists, permanent piers, equatorial wedges, remote 
operations, software, eyepieces, etc.

* My Stars Live - http://www.mystarslive.com/ 
Interactive Star Chart

* NASA Science News - http://science.nasa.gov/ 

* Northern Colorado Astronomical Society - http://ncastro.org/ 

* Sangre Stargazers - http://sangrestargazers.skymtn.com/ - New astronomy club 
in the Wet Mountain Valley of Custer County (about 45 miles due west of Pueblo, 
CO.)

* Sky and Space - http://www.skyandspace.com.au/public/home.ehtml 
Astronomy from Down Under - The Southern Hemisphere's first astronomy and space 
magazine.

* Skywatch Sightings from NASA - 
http://spaceflight.nasa.gov/realdata/sightings/ 
This site gives you the best times to watch the ISS pass over or near your 
location.

* Southern Colorado Astronomical Society - http://www.scasastronomy.info/

* Space.com - http://space.com 
Interesting space and astronomy articles.

* Space.com - Sky Watch Calendar -
http://www.space.com/spacewatch/sky_calendar.html 

* Spaceflight Now - http://spaceflightnow.com/ 

* "SpaceRef.com" - http://www.spaceref.com/ - SpaceRef's 21 news and reference 
web sites are designed to allow both the novice and specialist alike to explore 
outer space and Earth observation.
This site includes links to planetary updates such as Mercury Today, Venus 
Today, Earth Today, Moon Today, Mars Today, Jupiter Today, Saturn Today, Pluto 
Today, etc.

* Universe Today - http://www.universetoday.com 

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Acknowledgments and References

Much of the information in this newsletter is from "Astronomy Magazine" 
(Kalmbach Publishing), JPL mission status reports, the Internet, "Meteor 
Showers - A Descriptive Catalog" by Gary W. Kronk, Sky & Telescope web pages 
(S&T), and other astronomical sources that I have stashed on my book shelves.

The author will accept any suggestions, constructive criticisms, and 
corrections. Please feel free to send me any new links or articles to share as 
well. I will try to accommodate any reasonable requests. Please feel free to 
send questions, comments, criticisms, or donations to the email address listed 
below. Enjoy!

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Keep looking UP!
73 from KI0AR

Created by Burness F. Ansell, III
ki0ar@xxxxxxxxx

COO, Director of Aerospace Technologies, IAAS
JPL Solar System Ambassador, Colorado
Last modified: August 31, 2008


      
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IAAS Monthly Astronomy Newsletter\
September 2008\
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The International Association for Astronomical Studies provides this newsletter 
as a service for interested persons in the Denver Metro area. The astronomical 
data presented here is not only useful in Colorado but in other parts of the 
world as well.\
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This newsletter is published on the World Wide Web at 
{\field{\*\fldinst{HYPERLINK "http://www.ki0ar.com/astro.html"}}{\fldrslt 
\expnd0\expndtw0\kerning0
\ul http://www.ki0ar.com/astro.html}} - The Home of KI0AR - and is received 
nationally and internationally. A MS Word formatted downloadable version of the 
newsletter is at {\field{\*\fldinst{HYPERLINK 
"http://www.ki0ar.com/current_nl.doc"}}{\fldrslt \expnd0\expndtw0\kerning0
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An Open Invitation - For amateur radio and scanner enthusiasts, when in the 
Denver metro area, please join the Colorado Astronomy Net on the Rocky Mountain 
Radio League ({\field{\*\fldinst{HYPERLINK 
"http://rmrl.hamradios.com/"}}{\fldrslt \expnd0\expndtw0\kerning0
\ul http://rmrl.hamradios.com/}}) repeater on a frequency of 146.94 MHz on 
Tuesday nights at 7 P.M. local time.\
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Special Notice to Denver, CO area residents and visitors to the area: The 
Plains Conservation Center in Aurora hosts Full Moon Walks every month weather 
permitting on or near the night of the full Moon. Visit 
{\field{\*\fldinst{HYPERLINK 
"http://www.plainsconservationcenter.org"}}{\fldrslt \expnd0\expndtw0\kerning0
\ul http://www.plainsconservationcenter.org}} for more information and 
directions.\
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Excerpts from JPL mission updates are provided as a public service as part of 
the JPL Solar System Ambassador / NASA Outreach program.\
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In This Newsletter...\
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* The Moon\
* The Planets\
* Astronomical Events\
* Planetary/Lunar Exploration Missions\
* Web Sites of Interest\
* Acknowledgments and References\
* Subscription Information\
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New Feature - The Month At-A-Glance at {\field{\*\fldinst{HYPERLINK 
"http://www.ki0ar.com/ataglance.html"}}{\fldrslt \expnd0\expndtw0\kerning0
\ul http://www.ki0ar.com/ataglance.html}} \
I've added a link to a calendar displaying the daily astronomical events. 
Comments appreciated.\
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The Moon\
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Phases:\
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* New Moon on the 29th.\
* First Quarter Moon on the 7th.\
* Full Moon on the 15th.\
* Last Quarter Moon on the 22nd.\
\
* Apogee on the 7th, 251,167 mi. from Earth.\
* Perigee on the 19th, 229,215 mi. from Earth.\
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Moon/Planet Pairs:\
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* The Moon passes 5 deg. south of Venus on the 1st.\
* The Moon passes 3 deg. south of Mercury on the 1st.\
* The Moon passes 5 deg. south of Mars on the 2nd.\
* The Moon passes 0.3 deg. south of Antares on the 6th.\
* The Moon passes 3 deg. south of Jupiter on the 9th.\
* Mercury passes 4 deg. south of Venus on the 11th.\
* Venus passes 0.3 deg. north of Mars on the 11th.\
* Mercury passes 3 deg. south of Mars on the 12th.\
* The Moon passes 0.8 deg. north of Neptune on the 12th.\
* The Moon passes 4 deg. north of Uranus on the 15th.\
* Venus passes 3 deg. north of Spica on the 18th.\
* Mercury passes 4 deg. south of Mars on the 19th.\
* The Moon passes 1 deg. north of the Pleiades on the 19th.\
* Mars passes 2 deg. north of Spica on the 23rd.\
* The Moon passes 5 deg. south of Saturn on the 27th.\
* The Moon passes 5 deg. south of Mars on the 30th.\
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The Planets & Dwarf Planets\
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Planetary Reports generated by "TheSky" software. ({\field{\*\fldinst{HYPERLINK 
"http://www.ki0ar.com/planrpts.html"}}{\fldrslt \expnd0\expndtw0\kerning0
\ul http://www.ki0ar.com/planrpts.html}}) These reports provide predicted data 
for the planets for the first of each month for the current year. The rise and 
set times for the Sun and the Moon for each day of the month are also included 
in the reports.\
(All times are local unless otherwise noted.)\
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* 
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Planetary Highlights for September
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 - Planets abound in the early twilight hours soon after sunset early in the 
month. Mercury and Mars make brief appearances and are in conjunction with 
Venus on the 11th. Jupiter still dominates the southern sky all evening and 
Uranus and Neptune rise as the inner planets set. The Earth reaches Autumnal 
equinox.\
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* 
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Mercury
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 - Is at greatest eastern elongation (27 deg. above the western horizon) on the 
10th. Mercury sets at 8:23 p.m. on the 1st and about 6:48 p.m. by month's end. 
Look for Mercury low in the west soon after sunset. Mercury is in the 
constellation of Virgo shining at magnitude 0.2.\
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* 
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Venus
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 - Can be found low in the west soon after sunset. Keep an eye on Venus during 
the first 2 weeks of September as Venus, Mars and Mercury close in on each 
other for an interesting conjunction on the 11th. Venus sets at 8:28 p.m. on 
the 1st and about 7:56 p.m. by month's end. Venus is in the constellation of 
Virgo shining at magnitude -3.8.\
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* 
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Earth
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 - The Autumnal equinox occurs at 11:44 a.m. on the 22nd.\
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* 
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Mars
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 - Is still visible in the evening sky after sunset. Mars sets at 8:39 p.m. on 
the 1st and about 7:28 p.m. by month's end. Mars is in the constellation of 
Virgo shining at magnitude 1.7.\
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* 
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Jupiter
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 - Can be found in the southern sky soon after sunset. Jupiter sets at 1:53 
a.m. on the 1st and about 11:53 p.m. by month's end. Jupiter is in the 
constellation of Sagittarius shining at magnitude -2.4.\
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* 
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Saturn
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 - Is in conjunction with the Sun on the 3rd. Saturn is not visible until late 
in the month when it returns to the morning sky. Saturn rises about 4:59 a.m. 
by month's end. Saturn is in the constellation of Leo shining at magnitude 1.0 
on the 30th.\
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* 
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Uranus
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 - Is at opposition on the 12th, rising as the Sun sets. Uranus is at its best 
and brightest for the year. Uranus rises at 7:53 p.m. on the 1st and about 4:39 
p.m. by month's end. Uranus is in the constellation of Aquarius shining at 
magnitude 5.7.\
\
* 
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Neptune
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 - Rises at 6:39 p.m. on the 1st and about 4:39 p.m. by month's end. Neptune is 
in the constellation of Capricornus shining at magnitude 7.8.\
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Dwarf Planets\
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* 
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Ceres
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 \'96 Rises at 2:25 a.m. on the 1st and about \cf2 \expnd0\expndtw0\kerning0
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 a.m. by month\'92s end. Ceres is in the constellation of Cancer shining at 
magnitude 8.8.\
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* 
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Pluto
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 - Sets at 1:13 a.m. on the 1st and about 11:11 p.m. by month's end. Pluto 
shines at magnitude 14.0 in the constellation of Sagittarius. As always, good 
luck at spotting this one, a large telescope and very dark skies will be 
needed.\
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Astronomical Events\
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Meteor Showers\
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* No significant meteor shower activity this month, but you can expect to see 
from 1 to 4 meteors per hour early in the month.\
\
* For more information about Meteor Showers, visit Gary Kronk's Meteor Showers 
Online web page at {\field{\*\fldinst{HYPERLINK 
"http://meteorshowersonline.com/"}}{\fldrslt \expnd0\expndtw0\kerning0
\ul http://meteorshowersonline.com/}}.\
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Comets
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* Comet C/2007 W1 (Boattini) is now visible from late evening through the rest 
of the night. Comet Boattini is located in the constellation of Pisces this 
month, but you'll need to view this comet under dark skies as the Moon will 
interfere with this 10th magnitude object.\
\
* For information, orbital elements and ephemerides on observable comets visit 
the Observable Comets page from the Harvard-Smithsonian Center for Astrophysics 
({\field{\*\fldinst{HYPERLINK 
"http://cfa-www.harvard.edu/iau/Ephemerides/Comets/index.html"}}{\fldrslt 
\expnd0\expndtw0\kerning0
\ul http://cfa-www.harvard.edu/iau/Ephemerides/Comets/index.html}}).\
\
* For more information about Comets, visit Gary Kronk's Cometography.com web 
page at {\field{\*\fldinst{HYPERLINK "http://cometography.com/"}}{\fldrslt 
\expnd0\expndtw0\kerning0
\ul http://cometography.com/}}.\
\

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Eclipses
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* No eclipse activity this month.\
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Occultations
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* Information on various occultations can be found at 
{\field{\*\fldinst{HYPERLINK 
"http://lunar-occultations.com/iota/iotandx.htm"}}{\fldrslt 
\expnd0\expndtw0\kerning0
\ul http://lunar-occultations.com/iota/iotandx.htm}} , the International 
Occultation Timing Association's (IOTA) web site.\
\

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Asteroids
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 (From west to east)\
* 
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Parthenope
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 is in the constellation of Capricornus.\
* 
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Vesta
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 is in the constellation of Cetus.\
* 
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Metis
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 is in the constellation of Cetus.\
* 
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Pallas
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 is in the constellation of Lepus.\
\
* Information about the Minor Planets can be found at 
{\field{\*\fldinst{HYPERLINK "http://www.minorplanetobserver.com"}}{\fldrslt 
\expnd0\expndtw0\kerning0
\ul http://www.minorplanetobserver.com}} the Minor Planet Observer web site.\
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Planetary/Lunar Exploration Missions\
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(Excerpts from recent mission updates)\
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* 
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Cassini
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 - August 14, 2008\
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Cassini Pinpoints Source of Jets on Saturn's Moon Enceladus\
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"PASADENA, Calif. -- In a feat of interplanetary sharpshooting, NASA's Cassini 
spacecraft has pinpointed precisely where the icy jets erupt from the surface 
of Saturn's geologically active moon Enceladus. \
\
New carefully targeted pictures reveal exquisite details in the prominent south 
polar "tiger stripe" fractures from which the jets emanate. The images show the 
fractures are about 300 meters (980 feet) deep, with V-shaped inner walls. The 
outer flanks of some of the fractures show extensive deposits of fine material. 
Finely fractured terrain littered with blocks of ice tens of meters in size and 
larger (the size of small houses) surround the fractures. \
\
"This is the mother lode for us," said Carolyn Porco, Cassini imaging team 
leader at the Space Science Institute, Boulder, Colo. "A place that may 
ultimately reveal just exactly what kind of environment -- habitable or not -- 
we have within this tortured little moon." \
\
One highly anticipated result of this flyby was finding the location within the 
fractures from which the jets blast icy particles, water vapor and trace 
organics into space. Scientists are now studying the nature and intensity of 
this process on Enceladus, and its effects on surrounding terrain. This 
information, coupled with observations by Cassini's other instruments, may 
answer the question of whether reservoirs of liquid water exist beneath the 
surface."\
\
Cassini Imaging Team's website - {\field{\*\fldinst{HYPERLINK 
"http://ciclops.org"}}{\fldrslt \expnd0\expndtw0\kerning0
\ul http://ciclops.org}}.\
\
For the latest mission status reports, visit {\field{\*\fldinst{HYPERLINK 
"http://saturn.jpl.nasa.gov/home/index.cfm"}}{\fldrslt \expnd0\expndtw0\kerning0
\ul http://saturn.jpl.nasa.gov/home/index.cfm}}. The speed and location of the 
spacecraft can be viewed on the "Present Position" web page.\
({\field{\*\fldinst{HYPERLINK 
"http://saturn.jpl.nasa.gov/operations/present-position.cfm"}}{\fldrslt 
\expnd0\expndtw0\kerning0
\ul http://saturn.jpl.nasa.gov/operations/present-position.cfm}})\
\
* 
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New Horizons
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 - No new news since July 29, 2008\
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The PI's Perspective: Journeying Beyond Saturn\
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"As avid followers of New Horizons know, our spacecraft has been mostly 
hibernating since February, and will continue to so do until Sept. 2, when we 
will wake it to begin its second annual checkout. Many of you will also recall 
that New Horizons passed the orbit of Saturn in early June. New Horizons is the 
first spacecraft to venture this far (a billion kilometers from the Sun!) since 
the last of the Voyagers accomplished the same milestone in the summer of 1981. 
We are now nearly 96 million kilometers (60 million miles) beyond Saturn, and 
will cross the orbit of Uranus \'96 about 2 billion kilometers from the Sun 
\'96 in March 2011."\
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New Horizons gallery
\f1\b0 \expnd0\expndtw0\kerning0
 {\field{\*\fldinst{HYPERLINK 
"http://pluto.jhuapl.edu/gallery/sciencePhotos/"}}{\fldrslt 
\expnd0\expndtw0\kerning0
\ul http://pluto.jhuapl.edu/gallery/sciencePhotos/}}.\
\
For more information on the New Horizons mission - the first mission to the 
ninth planet - visit the New Horizons home page: {\field{\*\fldinst{HYPERLINK 
"http://pluto.jhuapl.edu/"}}{\fldrslt \expnd0\expndtw0\kerning0
\ul http://pluto.jhuapl.edu/}}.\
\
* 
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Dawn
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 - No new news since December 18, 2007\

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NASA's Dawn Spacecraft Begins Interplanetary Cruise Phase\
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"NASA's Dawn spacecraft has successfully completed the initial checkout phase 
of the mission and begun its interplanetary cruise phase, which is highlighted 
by nearly continuous thrusting of its ion propulsion system. Dawn is on an 
8-year, 3-billion mile journey to asteroid Vesta and dwarf planet Ceres."\
\
For more information on the Dawn mission, visit the Dawn home page: 
{\field{\*\fldinst{HYPERLINK 
"http://www.nasa.gov/mission_pages/dawn/main/index.html"}}{\fldrslt 
\expnd0\expndtw0\kerning0
\ul http://www.nasa.gov/mission_pages/dawn/main/index.html}}.\
\
* 
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MESSENGER
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 - August 4, 2008\
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Sharing the Wealth: MESSENGER Team Delivers Mercury Flyby 1 Data to Planetary 
Data System\
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"Data from MESSENGER\'92s first flyby of Mercury have been released to the 
public by the Planetary Data System (PDS), an organization that archives and 
distributes all of NASA\'92s planetary mission data.\
\
\'93This delivery, while not the first for the MESSENGER mission, represents a 
significant milestone,\'94 says MESSENGER Mission Archive Coordinator Alan 
Mick, of the Johns Hopkins University Applied Physics Laboratory. \'93We had 
delivered data from MESSENGER to the PDS before, but not Mercury data,\'94 he 
says. \'93This delivery was particularly significant \'97 the first MESSENGER 
flyby of Mercury was mankind\'92s return to this planet after an absence of 
over three decades. In this one flyby we imaged previously unseen areas of 
Mercury\'92s surface, greatly improved the resolution in areas already covered, 
and made observations of a kind that had never been made before.\'94\
\
Calibrated data from three of the probe\'92s science instruments \'97 the 
Magnetometer (MAG), the Mercury Atmospheric and Surface Composition 
Spectrometer (MASCS), and the Mercury Dual Imaging System (MDIS) \'97 are 
included in this release. \'93The science results from these instruments have 
already shed light on questions about Mercury that have lingered for more than 
three decades,\'94 says MESSENGER Project Scientist Ralph McNutt of APL."\
\
For more information on the MESSENGER mission, visit the MESSENGER home page: 
{\field{\*\fldinst{HYPERLINK "http://messenger.jhuapl.edu/"}}{\fldrslt 
\expnd0\expndtw0\kerning0
\ul http://messenger.jhuapl.edu/}}.\
\
* 
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Pack Your Backpack
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Calling all explorers! Tour JPL with our new Virtual Field Trip site. Stops 
include Mission Control and the Rover Lab. Your guided tour starts when you 
select a "face" that will be yours throughout the visit. Cool space images and 
souvenirs are all included in your visit.\
+ {\field{\*\fldinst{HYPERLINK 
"http://virtualfieldtrip.jpl.nasa.gov/"}}{\fldrslt \expnd0\expndtw0\kerning0
\ul http://virtualfieldtrip.jpl.nasa.gov/}} \
* Past, Present, Future and Proposed JPL Missions - 
{\field{\*\fldinst{HYPERLINK "http://www.jpl.nasa.gov/missions"}}{\fldrslt 
\expnd0\expndtw0\kerning0
\ul http://www.jpl.nasa.gov/missions}}.\
\
* For special JPL programs and presentations in your area visit the JPL Solar 
System Ambassador web site at {\field{\*\fldinst{HYPERLINK 
"http://www2.jpl.nasa.gov/ambassador/index.html"}}{\fldrslt 
\expnd0\expndtw0\kerning0
\ul http://www2.jpl.nasa.gov/ambassador/index.html}}.\
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Mars Missions\
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* 
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Mars Odyssey Orbiter
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 - No new news since March 20, 2008\
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NASA Mission Finds New Clues to Guide Search for Life on Mars\
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\f1\b0 \cf0 \expnd0\expndtw0\kerning0
\
"PASADENA, Calif. - NASA's Mars Odyssey orbiter has found evidence of salt 
deposits. These deposits point to places where water once was abundant and 
where evidence might exist of possible Martian life from the Red Planet's past.\
\
A team led by Mikki Osterloo of the University of Hawaii, Honolulu, found 
approximately 200 places on southern Mars that show spectral characteristics 
consistent with chloride minerals. Chloride is part of many types of salt, such 
as sodium chloride or table salt. The sites range from about a square kilometer 
(0.4 square mile) to 25 times that size."\
\
"A simulated fly-through using the newly assembled imagery is available online 
at {\field{\*\fldinst{HYPERLINK 
"http://www.nasa.gov/mission_pages/mars/missions/odyssey/20060313.html"}}{\fldrslt
 \expnd0\expndtw0\kerning0
\ul http://www.nasa.gov/mission_pages/mars/missions/odyssey/20060313.html}}.\
\
The fly-through plus tools for wandering across and zooming into the large 
image are at {\field{\*\fldinst{HYPERLINK "http://themis.asu.edu/"}}{\fldrslt 
\expnd0\expndtw0\kerning0
\ul http://themis.asu.edu/}}."\
\
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\f0\b \cf0 \expnd0\expndtw0\kerning0
MARS ODYSSEY THEMIS IMAGES\
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\f1\b0 \cf0 \expnd0\expndtw0\kerning0
Thermal Emission Imaging System (THEMIS) web site: 
({\field{\*\fldinst{HYPERLINK "http://themis.asu.edu/"}}{\fldrslt 
\expnd0\expndtw0\kerning0
\ul http://themis.asu.edu/}})\
\
\pard\tx560\tx1120\tx1680\tx2240\tx2800\tx3360\tx3920\tx4480\tx5040\tx5600\tx6160\tx6720\pardeftab720\ql\qnatural\pardirnatural

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August 18-22, 2008\
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\f1\b0 \cf0 \expnd0\expndtw0\kerning0
\
* Tempe Terra (Released 18 August 2008)\
 {\field{\*\fldinst{HYPERLINK "http://themis.asu.edu/zoom-20080818a"}}{\fldrslt 
\cf4 \expnd0\expndtw0\kerning0
\ul \ulc4 http://themis.asu.edu/zoom-20080818a}}\
\
* Dunes (Released 19 August 2008)\
 {\field{\*\fldinst{HYPERLINK "http://themis.asu.edu/zoom-20080819a"}}{\fldrslt 
\cf4 \expnd0\expndtw0\kerning0
\ul \ulc4 http://themis.asu.edu/zoom-20080819a}}\
\
* Lycus Sulci (Released 20 August 2008)\
 {\field{\*\fldinst{HYPERLINK "http://themis.asu.edu/zoom-20080820a"}}{\fldrslt 
\cf4 \expnd0\expndtw0\kerning0
\ul \ulc4 http://themis.asu.edu/zoom-20080820a}}\
\
* Polar Layers (Released 21 August 2008)\
 {\field{\*\fldinst{HYPERLINK "http://themis.asu.edu/zoom-20080821a"}}{\fldrslt 
\cf4 \expnd0\expndtw0\kerning0
\ul \ulc4 http://themis.asu.edu/zoom-20080821a}}\
\
* Polar Erg (Released 22 August 2008)\
 {\field{\*\fldinst{HYPERLINK "http://themis.asu.edu/zoom-20080822a"}}{\fldrslt 
\cf4 \expnd0\expndtw0\kerning0
\ul \ulc4 http://themis.asu.edu/zoom-20080822a}}\
\
\pard\tx560\tx1120\tx1680\tx2240\tx2800\tx3360\tx3920\tx4480\tx5040\tx5600\tx6160\tx6720\pardeftab720\ql\qnatural\pardirnatural

\f0\b \cf0 \expnd0\expndtw0\kerning0
All of the THEMIS
\f1\b0 \expnd0\expndtw0\kerning0
 images are archived here:\
\pard\tx560\tx1120\tx1680\tx2240\tx2800\tx3360\tx3920\tx4480\tx5040\tx5600\tx6160\tx6720\pardeftab720\ql\qnatural\pardirnatural
{\field{\*\fldinst{HYPERLINK "http://themis.la.asu.edu/latest.html"}}{\fldrslt 
\cf0 \expnd0\expndtw0\kerning0
\ul \ulc0 http://themis.la.asu.edu/latest.html}} \
\
The Odyssey data are available through a new online access system established 
by the Planetary Data System at: {\field{\*\fldinst{HYPERLINK 
"http://starbrite.jpl.nasa.gov/pds/"}}{\fldrslt \expnd0\expndtw0\kerning0
\ul http://starbrite.jpl.nasa.gov/pds/}} \
\
Visit the Mars Odyssey Mission page at {\field{\*\fldinst{HYPERLINK 
"http://mars.jpl.nasa.gov/odyssey/index.html"}}{\fldrslt 
\expnd0\expndtw0\kerning0
\ul http://mars.jpl.nasa.gov/odyssey/index.html}}.\
\
* 
\f0\b \expnd0\expndtw0\kerning0
Mars Exploration Rover Mission
\f1\b0 \expnd0\expndtw0\kerning0
 (Spirit and Opportunity) -\
August 14, 2008\
\
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\f0\b \cf0 \expnd0\expndtw0\kerning0
Spirit Status: Waiting Out the Winter
\f1\b0 \expnd0\expndtw0\kerning0
 - 
\f2\i \expnd0\expndtw0\kerning0
sol 1628-1634, August 01-07, 2008
\f1\i0 \expnd0\expndtw0\kerning0
\
\
"Spirit's battery levels are slowly edging upward, thanks to a slight decrease 
in atmospheric dust (Tau) and a gradual increase in sunlight as winter gives 
way to spring.\
\
Early in the week, Spirit spent two Martian days carrying out contingency plans 
following a temporary delay in data transmission from Earth. Spirit implemented 
the so-called "runout" portion of an earlier master sequence on sols 1628 and 
1629 (Aug. 1-2, 2008). Subsequent relays of new instructions from Earth on sols 
1629 and 1632 (Aug. 2 and Aug. 5, 2008) went off without a hitch.\
\
Spirit remains healthy, with all subsystems performing as expected as of sol 
1630 (Aug. 3, 2008)."\
\

\f0\b \expnd0\expndtw0\kerning0
Opportunity Status: Opportunity Eyes Challenges Ahead
\f1\b0 \expnd0\expndtw0\kerning0
 - 
\f2\i \expnd0\expndtw0\kerning0
sol 1614-1620, August 8-14, 2008
\f1\i0 \expnd0\expndtw0\kerning0
\
\
"Opportunity faces several challenges on the way out of "Victoria Crater" but 
continues to make steady progress. The first of these is a traverse of 
approximately 10 meters (30 feet, a little longer than a double-decker bus) 
across a sandy, 17-degree slope. Opportunity is more than halfway through that 
part of the journey. The next is a drive across 30 to 50 meters (100 to 160 
feet), depending on the route taken, of rocky outcrop. The final leg of the 
climb will require Opportunity to cross the ripple surrounding the alcove known 
as "Duck Bay."\
\
Because Opportunity is facing the threat of a drive-motor failure on the left 
front wheel, the engineering team has been working on pseudo-"Mars time" for 
the past week to take advantage of extra drive opportunities.\
\
Opportunity remains healthy, with all subsystems performing as expected as of 
the downlink of information from NASA's Odyssey orbiter on sol 1620 (Aug. 14, 
2008)."\
\
Landing sites link - {\field{\*\fldinst{HYPERLINK 
"http://marsoweb.nas.nasa.gov/landingsites/"}}{\fldrslt 
\expnd0\expndtw0\kerning0
\ul http://marsoweb.nas.nasa.gov/landingsites/}} \
Visit the Mars Exploration Rover page at\
 {\field{\*\fldinst{HYPERLINK 
"http://marsrovers.jpl.nasa.gov/home/index.html"}}{\fldrslt 
\expnd0\expndtw0\kerning0
\ul http://marsrovers.jpl.nasa.gov/home/index.html}}.\
\
* 
\f0\b \expnd0\expndtw0\kerning0
Mars Reconnaissance Orbiter Mission
\f1\b0 \expnd0\expndtw0\kerning0
 - No new news since July 16, 2008\

\f0\b \expnd0\expndtw0\kerning0
NASA Spacecraft Shows Diverse, Wet Environments on Ancient Mars\
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\
"WASHINGTON -- Two studies based on data from NASA's Mars Reconnaissance 
Orbiter have revealed that the Red Planet once hosted vast lakes, flowing 
rivers and a variety of other wet environments that had the potential to 
support life. \
\
One study, published in the July 17 issue of Nature, shows that vast regions of 
the ancient highlands of Mars, which cover about half the planet, contain clay 
minerals, which can form only in the presence of water. Volcanic lavas buried 
the clay-rich regions during subsequent, drier periods of the planet's history, 
but impact craters later exposed them at thousands of locations across Mars. 
The data for the study derives from images taken by the Compact Reconnaissance 
Imaging Spectrometer for Mars, or CRISM, and other instruments on the orbiter. \
\
"The big surprise from these new results is how pervasive and long-lasting 
Mars' water was, and how diverse the wet environments were," said Scott 
Murchie, CRISM principal investigator at the Johns Hopkins University Applied 
Physics Laboratory in Laurel, Md."\
\
\pard\tx560\tx1120\tx1680\tx2240\tx2800\tx3360\tx3920\tx4480\tx5040\tx5600\tx6160\tx6720\pardeftab720\ql\qnatural\pardirnatural

\f0\b \cf0 \expnd0\expndtw0\kerning0
MARS RECONNAISSANCE ORBITER HIRISE IMAGES\
\pard\tx560\tx1120\tx1680\tx2240\tx2800\tx3360\tx3920\tx4480\tx5040\tx5600\tx6160\tx6720\pardeftab720\ql\qnatural\pardirnatural

\f1\b0 \cf0 \expnd0\expndtw0\kerning0
August 20, 2008\
\
* Gullies and Bedrock Exposures in Impact Crater Wall\
 {\field{\*\fldinst{HYPERLINK 
"http://hirise.lpl.arizona.edu/PSP_009155_1480"}}{\fldrslt \cf4 
\expnd0\expndtw0\kerning0
\ul \ulc4 http://hirise.lpl.arizona.edu/PSP_009155_1480}}\
\
* Fresh Double-Layered Ejecta Crater \
 {\field{\*\fldinst{HYPERLINK 
"http://hirise.lpl.arizona.edu/PSP_009160_2350"}}{\fldrslt \cf4 
\expnd0\expndtw0\kerning0
\ul \ulc4 http://hirise.lpl.arizona.edu/PSP_009160_2350}}\
\
* Cratered Cones in Isidis Planitia \
 {\field{\*\fldinst{HYPERLINK 
"http://hirise.lpl.arizona.edu/PSP_009177_1985"}}{\fldrslt \cf4 
\expnd0\expndtw0\kerning0
\ul \ulc4 http://hirise.lpl.arizona.edu/PSP_009177_1985}}\
\
* Eroding Dunes in Chasma Boreale\
 {\field{\*\fldinst{HYPERLINK 
"http://hirise.lpl.arizona.edu/PSP_009114_2645"}}{\fldrslt \cf4 
\expnd0\expndtw0\kerning0
\ul \ulc4 http://hirise.lpl.arizona.edu/PSP_009114_2645}}\
\
All of the HiRISE images are archived here:\
\pard\tx560\tx1120\tx1680\tx2240\tx2800\tx3360\tx3920\tx4480\tx5040\tx5600\tx6160\tx6720\pardeftab720\ql\qnatural\pardirnatural
{\field{\*\fldinst{HYPERLINK "http://hirise.lpl.arizona.edu/"}}{\fldrslt \cf0 
\expnd0\expndtw0\kerning0
\ul \ulc0 http://hirise.lpl.arizona.edu/}}.\
\
\
More information about the MRO mission is available online at 
{\field{\*\fldinst{HYPERLINK "http://www.nasa.gov/mro"}}{\fldrslt 
\expnd0\expndtw0\kerning0
\ul http://www.nasa.gov/mro}}.\
\
* 
\f0\b \expnd0\expndtw0\kerning0
Phoenix Mars Lander Mission
\f1\b0 \expnd0\expndtw0\kerning0
 - August 29, 2008\
\pard\tx560\tx1120\tx1680\tx2240\tx2800\tx3360\tx3920\tx4480\tx5040\tx5600\tx6160\tx6720\pardeftab720\ql\qnatural\pardirnatural

\f0\b \cf0 \expnd0\expndtw0\kerning0
NASA Phoenix Mission Conducting Extended Activities on Mars\
\pard\tx560\tx1120\tx1680\tx2240\tx2800\tx3360\tx3920\tx4480\tx5040\tx5600\tx6160\tx6720\pardeftab720\ql\qnatural\pardirnatural

\f1\b0 \cf0 \expnd0\expndtw0\kerning0
\
"TUCSON, Ariz. -- NASA's Phoenix Mars Lander, having completed its 90-day 
primary mission, is continuing its science collection activities. Science and 
engineering teams are looking forward to at least another month of Martian 
exploration.\
\
Due to the spacecraft's sufficient power and experiment capacity, NASA 
announced on July 31 that the mission would continue operations through Sept. 
30. Once the lander finishes collecting science data, the mission teams will 
continue the analysis of the measurements and observations.\
\
"We have been successful beyond my wildest dreams, and we're not done yet 
learning from Mars about its secrets," said Peter Smith, Phoenix principal 
investigator from the University of Arizona, Tucson.\
\
"We are still working to understand the properties and the history of the ice 
at our landing site on the northern plains of Mars. While the sun has begun to 
dip below the horizon, we still have power to continue our observations and 
experiments. And we're hoping to see a gradual change in the Martian weather in 
the next few weeks," he said."\
\
Visit the Phoenix Mars Lander Mission pages at {\field{\*\fldinst{HYPERLINK 
"http://www.nasa.gov/mission_pages/phoenix/main/index.html"}}{\fldrslt 
\expnd0\expndtw0\kerning0
\ul http://www.nasa.gov/mission_pages/phoenix/main/index.html}}.\
\
* Mars Missions Status - New Mars missions are being planned to include several 
new rover and sample collection missions. Check out the Mars Missions web page: 
{\field{\*\fldinst{HYPERLINK "http://mars.jpl.nasa.gov/missions/"}}{\fldrslt 
\expnd0\expndtw0\kerning0
\ul http://mars.jpl.nasa.gov/missions/}} and the Mars Exploration page: 
{\field{\*\fldinst{HYPERLINK "http://marsprogram.jpl.nasa.gov/"}}{\fldrslt 
\expnd0\expndtw0\kerning0
\ul http://marsprogram.jpl.nasa.gov/}} \
\
-----------------------------------------------------------\
\
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\f0\b \cf0 \expnd0\expndtw0\kerning0
Links and Other Space News\
\pard\tx560\tx1120\tx1680\tx2240\tx2800\tx3360\tx3920\tx4480\tx5040\tx5600\tx6160\tx6720\pardeftab720\ql\qnatural\pardirnatural

\f1\b0 \cf0 \expnd0\expndtw0\kerning0
(If you have a link you would like to recommend to our readers, please feel 
free to submit it.)\
\
 \
\
* 
\f0\b \expnd0\expndtw0\kerning0
"TheSky" Software
\f1\b0 \expnd0\expndtw0\kerning0
 - {\field{\*\fldinst{HYPERLINK "http://www.bisque.com"}}{\fldrslt 
\expnd0\expndtw0\kerning0
\ul http://www.bisque.com}} \
\
* 
\f0\b \expnd0\expndtw0\kerning0
A Short Guide to Celestial
\f1\b0 \expnd0\expndtw0\kerning0
 Navigation - {\field{\*\fldinst{HYPERLINK "http://www.celnav.de/"}}{\fldrslt 
\expnd0\expndtw0\kerning0
\ul http://www.celnav.de/}} \
\
* 
\f0\b \expnd0\expndtw0\kerning0
Astrogirl Homepage
\f1\b0 \expnd0\expndtw0\kerning0
 - {\field{\*\fldinst{HYPERLINK "http://www.astrogirl.org"}}{\fldrslt 
\expnd0\expndtw0\kerning0
\ul http://www.astrogirl.org}} \
\
* 
\f0\b \expnd0\expndtw0\kerning0
Astronomical Lexicon
\f1\b0 \expnd0\expndtw0\kerning0
 - {\field{\*\fldinst{HYPERLINK "http://www.ki0ar.com/astrolex.html"}}{\fldrslt 
\expnd0\expndtw0\kerning0
\ul http://www.ki0ar.com/astrolex.html}} \
Many of the astronomical terms used in this newsletter are defined here.\
\
* 
\f0\b \expnd0\expndtw0\kerning0
Astronomy Picture of the Day
\f1\b0 \expnd0\expndtw0\kerning0
 - {\field{\*\fldinst{HYPERLINK 
"http://antwrp.gsfc.nasa.gov/apod/astropix.html"}}{\fldrslt 
\expnd0\expndtw0\kerning0
\ul http://antwrp.gsfc.nasa.gov/apod/astropix.html}} \
\
* 
\f0\b \expnd0\expndtw0\kerning0
Celestron Telescopes
\f1\b0 \expnd0\expndtw0\kerning0
 - {\field{\*\fldinst{HYPERLINK 
"http://www.celestron.com/c2/index.php"}}{\fldrslt \expnd0\expndtw0\kerning0
\ul http://www.celestron.com/c2/index.php}} - New beta website\
\
* 
\f0\b \expnd0\expndtw0\kerning0
Cloudbait Observatory
\f1\b0 \expnd0\expndtw0\kerning0
, Guffey Colorado - {\field{\*\fldinst{HYPERLINK 
"http://www.cloudbait.com"}}{\fldrslt \expnd0\expndtw0\kerning0
\ul http://www.cloudbait.com}} - Submit your fireball reports here. 
Interesting, knowledgeable site.\
\
* 
\f0\b \expnd0\expndtw0\kerning0
The Constellations and Their Stars
\f1\b0 \expnd0\expndtw0\kerning0
 - {\field{\*\fldinst{HYPERLINK 
"http://www.astro.wisc.edu/~dolan/constellations/constellations.html"}}{\fldrslt
 \expnd0\expndtw0\kerning0
\ul http://www.astro.wisc.edu/~dolan/constellations/constellations.html}} \
Good site for finding out more about the 88 constellations and their associated 
stars.\
\
* 
\f0\b \expnd0\expndtw0\kerning0
Denver Astronomical Society
\f1\b0 \expnd0\expndtw0\kerning0
 - {\field{\*\fldinst{HYPERLINK "http://www.denverastrosociety.org"}}{\fldrslt 
\expnd0\expndtw0\kerning0
\ul http://www.denverastrosociety.org}} \
\
* 
\f0\b \expnd0\expndtw0\kerning0
Distant Suns
\f1\b0 \expnd0\expndtw0\kerning0
 - {\field{\*\fldinst{HYPERLINK "http://www.distantsuns.com/"}}{\fldrslt 
\expnd0\expndtw0\kerning0
\ul http://www.distantsuns.com/}} \
Desktop Astronomy package for PCs.\
\
* 
\f0\b \expnd0\expndtw0\kerning0
Eric's Black Sun Eclipse website
\f1\b0 \expnd0\expndtw0\kerning0
 -\
\pard\tx560\tx1120\tx1680\tx2240\tx2800\tx3360\tx3920\tx4480\tx5040\tx5600\tx6160\tx6720\pardeftab720\ql\qnatural\pardirnatural
{\field{\*\fldinst{HYPERLINK "http://www.ericsblacksuneclipse.com"}}{\fldrslt 
\cf0 \expnd0\expndtw0\kerning0
\ul \ulc0 http://www.ericsblacksuneclipse.com}} \
\
* 
\f0\b \expnd0\expndtw0\kerning0
Groovy Adventures
\f1\b0 \expnd0\expndtw0\kerning0
 - {\field{\*\fldinst{HYPERLINK "http://www.groovyadventures.com"}}{\fldrslt 
\expnd0\expndtw0\kerning0
\ul http://www.groovyadventures.com}} \
Unique adventures and vacations including astronomy related vacations.\
\
* 
\f0\b \expnd0\expndtw0\kerning0
JPL Solar System Ambassador Program
\f1\b0 \expnd0\expndtw0\kerning0
 -\
\pard\tx560\tx1120\tx1680\tx2240\tx2800\tx3360\tx3920\tx4480\tx5040\tx5600\tx6160\tx6720\pardeftab720\ql\qnatural\pardirnatural
{\field{\*\fldinst{HYPERLINK 
"http://www.jpl.nasa.gov/ambassador/front.html"}}{\fldrslt \cf0 
\expnd0\expndtw0\kerning0
\ul \ulc0 http://www.jpl.nasa.gov/ambassador/front.html}}\
\
* JPL Solar System - {\field{\*\fldinst{HYPERLINK 
"http://www.jpl.nasa.gov/solar_system/"}}{\fldrslt \expnd0\expndtw0\kerning0
\ul http://www.jpl.nasa.gov/solar_system/}} \
\
* 
\f0\b \expnd0\expndtw0\kerning0
Meade Advanced Products Users Group
\f1\b0 \expnd0\expndtw0\kerning0
 - {\field{\*\fldinst{HYPERLINK "http://www.mapug-astronomy.net/"}}{\fldrslt 
\expnd0\expndtw0\kerning0
\ul http://www.mapug-astronomy.net/}} - Mapug-Astronomy Topical Archive & 
information resource, containing a massive 335 page archive of discussions 
about Meade equipment, and much more: observatories, observing lists, permanent 
piers, equatorial wedges, remote operations, software, eyepieces, etc.\
\
* 
\f0\b \expnd0\expndtw0\kerning0
My Stars Live
\f1\b0 \expnd0\expndtw0\kerning0
 - {\field{\*\fldinst{HYPERLINK "http://www.mystarslive.com/"}}{\fldrslt 
\expnd0\expndtw0\kerning0
\ul http://www.mystarslive.com/}} \
Interactive Star Chart\
\
* 
\f0\b \expnd0\expndtw0\kerning0
NASA Science News
\f1\b0 \expnd0\expndtw0\kerning0
 - {\field{\*\fldinst{HYPERLINK "http://science.nasa.gov/"}}{\fldrslt 
\expnd0\expndtw0\kerning0
\ul http://science.nasa.gov/}} \
\
* 
\f0\b \expnd0\expndtw0\kerning0
Northern Colorado Astronomical Society
\f1\b0 \expnd0\expndtw0\kerning0
 - {\field{\*\fldinst{HYPERLINK "http://ncastro.org/"}}{\fldrslt 
\expnd0\expndtw0\kerning0
\ul http://ncastro.org/}} \
\
* 
\f0\b \expnd0\expndtw0\kerning0
Sangre Stargazers
\f1\b0 \expnd0\expndtw0\kerning0
 - {\field{\*\fldinst{HYPERLINK 
"http://sangrestargazers.skymtn.com/"}}{\fldrslt \expnd0\expndtw0\kerning0
\ul http://sangrestargazers.skymtn.com/}} - New astronomy club in the Wet 
Mountain Valley of Custer County (about 45 miles due west of Pueblo, CO.)\
\
* 
\f0\b \expnd0\expndtw0\kerning0
Sky and Space
\f1\b0 \expnd0\expndtw0\kerning0
 - {\field{\*\fldinst{HYPERLINK 
"http://www.skyandspace.com.au/public/home.ehtml"}}{\fldrslt 
\expnd0\expndtw0\kerning0
\ul http://www.skyandspace.com.au/public/home.ehtml}} \
Astronomy from Down Under - The Southern Hemisphere's first astronomy and space 
magazine.\
\
* 
\f0\b \expnd0\expndtw0\kerning0
Skywatch Sightings from NASA
\f1\b0 \expnd0\expndtw0\kerning0
 - {\field{\*\fldinst{HYPERLINK 
"http://spaceflight.nasa.gov/realdata/sightings/"}}{\fldrslt 
\expnd0\expndtw0\kerning0
\ul http://spaceflight.nasa.gov/realdata/sightings/}} \
This site gives you the best times to watch the ISS pass over or near your 
location.\
\
* 
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Southern Colorado Astronomical Society
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 - {\field{\*\fldinst{HYPERLINK "http://www.scasastronomy.info/"}}{\fldrslt 
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\ul http://www.scasastronomy.info/}}\
\
* 
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Space.com
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 - {\field{\*\fldinst{HYPERLINK "http://space.com"}}{\fldrslt 
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\ul http://space.com}} \
Interesting space and astronomy articles.\
\
* 
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Space.com
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 - Sky Watch Calendar -\
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{\field{\*\fldinst{HYPERLINK 
"http://www.space.com/spacewatch/sky_calendar.html"}}{\fldrslt \cf0 
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\ul \ulc0 http://www.space.com/spacewatch/sky_calendar.html}} \
\
* 
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Spaceflight Now
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 - {\field{\*\fldinst{HYPERLINK "http://spaceflightnow.com/"}}{\fldrslt 
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\ul http://spaceflightnow.com/}} \
\
* 
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"SpaceRef.com"
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 - {\field{\*\fldinst{HYPERLINK "http://www.spaceref.com/"}}{\fldrslt 
\expnd0\expndtw0\kerning0
\ul http://www.spaceref.com/}} - SpaceRef's 21 news and reference web sites are 
designed to allow both the novice and specialist alike to explore outer space 
and Earth observation.\
This site includes links to planetary updates such as Mercury Today, Venus 
Today, Earth Today, Moon Today, Mars Today, Jupiter Today, Saturn Today, Pluto 
Today, etc.\
\
* 
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Universe Today
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 - {\field{\*\fldinst{HYPERLINK "http://www.universetoday.com"}}{\fldrslt 
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\ul http://www.universetoday.com}} \
\
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Acknowledgments and References\
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\
Much of the information in this newsletter is from "Astronomy Magazine" 
(Kalmbach Publishing), JPL mission status reports, the Internet, "Meteor 
Showers - A Descriptive Catalog" by Gary W. Kronk, Sky & Telescope web pages 
(S&T), and other astronomical sources that I have stashed on my book shelves.\
\
The author will accept any suggestions, constructive criticisms, and 
corrections. Please feel free to send me any new links or articles to share as 
well. I will try to accommodate any reasonable requests. Please feel free to 
send questions, comments, criticisms, or donations to the email address listed 
below. Enjoy!\
\
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Subscription Information\
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- Users can subscribe to your list by sending email to 
astronews-request@xxxxxxxxxxxxx with 'subscribe' in the Subject field OR by 
logging into the Web interface.\
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- Users can unsubscribe from the list by sending email to 
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- Email Newsletter archives -\
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- Full documentation of the online administration system is available at 
{\field{\*\fldinst{HYPERLINK "http://www.freelists.org/help/"}}{\fldrslt 
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Keep looking UP!\
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73 from KI0AR\
\
Created by Burness F. Ansell, III\
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{\field{\*\fldinst{HYPERLINK "mailto:ki0ar@xxxxxxxxx"}}{\fldrslt \cf0 
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\ul \ulc0 ki0ar@xxxxxxxxx}}\
\
COO, Director of Aerospace Technologies, IAAS\
JPL Solar System Ambassador, Colorado\
Last modified: August 31, 2008}

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