[accessibleimage] Re: SV: Re: Thermo-Pen and Draftsman

Just so you will know, I'm neither blind nor visually impaired.

By 3D, I assume that you are talking about something like the variable dot
height of a Tiger. Please correct me if I am wrong.

I look forward to seeing your list of questions, and am also interested in
your concept of converting non 3D embossers into 3D embossers. That sounds
to me like an almost insurmountable challenge.

My efforts in the bitmap-to-tactile conversion area so far have centered on
taking advantage of the 16 million colors in a typical bitmap image to
produce meaningful tactile graphics, as opposed to throwing away all except
255 shades of gray and then trying to produce meaningful tactile graphics.
The challenge isn't in coming up with a scheme to accomplish this. The
challenge is in coming up with a scheme that a blind user can handle
completely independent of sighted assistance. The jury is still out on
whether or not I will succeed in this endeavor.

By the way, any software that I write will probably be written using Java.
While I teach computer programming using Java, C++, and C#, my favorite
language is Java, so I tend to stick with it.

If I write something in Java that needs to be in C++, there is probably an
outstanding blind programmer somewhere in the world who would be willing to
port the code into C++.

Dick Baldwin

On Tue, Jan 17, 2012 at 4:44 PM, cpond <cpond@xxxxxxxxx> wrote:

>   Hi Dick, and thanks for replying.  I’m a hardware guy; studied biology
> and then electronics.  I use an optacon to read most diagrams and printed
> stuff.  Although I’ve studied C and C-plus plus and some assembler for
> certain microprocessors and such, I’m certainly no programmer.
>
> I have in mind a flow chart of questions which the tactile graphics
> software asks the user before making the printer roar.  I’ll send you the
> list of questions as soon as I can upload it, and it is a work in
> progress.  I look at the job of embossing tactile graphics as a blind
> reader and as a designer would and try to map this onto software, which is
> often too empirical and not “intuitive” or neurological enough.  By
> answering the questions which are in only a few cases as technical as pixel
> counts, the software has “a good idea” of how to emboss the graphics.  As
> much as possibel the labour-intensive work is reduced.
>
>
> I’m also working on a device which can draw realtime screen layouts or
> graphics in three-D.  Basically a three-D plotter which draws on the
> underside of an impressionable overlay, and the person feels the image
> topside.
>
> List coming...
>
> Charles Pond
> Ottawa Ontario, Canada
>   *From:* Richard Baldwin <baldwin@xxxxxxxxxxxxxxx>
> *Sent:* Tuesday, January 17, 2012 5:26 PM
> *To:* accessibleimage@xxxxxxxxxxxxx
> *Subject:* [accessibleimage] Re: SV: Re: Thermo-Pen and Draftsman
>
> I'm a software person, and am currently working on a program to make it
> more practical for blind users to create tactile graphics from bitmap
> files. What do you have in mind?
>
> Dick Baldwin
>
> On Tue, Jan 17, 2012 at 4:04 PM, cpond <cpond@xxxxxxxxx> wrote:
>
>>   It appears that the E.T.C.’s Phoenix has a good DPI of 25, but the
>> dots are not of varying heights
>>
>> Enabling Technologies Company also has/had a printer which would draw
>> graphics on mylar.
>>
>> As we all know, the ads which tell us that, with a few presses of a few
>> buttons we can emboss wonderful tactile graphics scanned in, are just
>> silly.  It takes a lot of hands-on editing to make up an embossable tactile
>> graphics file: clutter, labeling and textboxes, resising, moving objects,
>> making legends, etc etc.
>>
>> I can envision some software which would ease soe of this
>> labour-intensive loe work after the software asks some relevant questions
>> of the tactile designer.  If anyone on list is a software person, let’s
>> take it offf list and work together to somewhat more so automate the
>> process.
>>
>> Charles
>>   *From:* Lucia Hasty <lucia@xxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxx>
>> *Sent:* Tuesday, January 17, 2012 2:31 PM
>>  *To:* accessibleimage@xxxxxxxxxxxxx
>> *Subject:* [accessibleimage] Re: SV: Re: Thermo-Pen and Draftsman
>>
>>  Please keep us posted on your embosser kit, Charles.
>>
>> By the way, Enabling Technologies also sells the Thermo-Pen, as well as
>> their new braille and graphics embosser the Phoenix. More details at
>> http://brailler.com/tacgraphics.htm
>>
>> Lucia
>>
>>
>> On Tue, Jan 17, 2012 at 12:08 PM, cpond <cpond@xxxxxxxxx> wrote:
>>
>>>   Yes I did have the Sewell raised line drawing kit, and I now use
>>> something along the same “lines”, which is a European product.  The thin
>>> mylar sheets are clamped down by a long flat metallic bar on either side of
>>> the sheet.  The board is equipped with small gradations for measuring.  I
>>> use stencils and such for drawing lines, circles and angles.
>>>
>>> When using regular paper to draw upon, one must hold the scribing pen at
>>> a certain optimal angle, and press firmly.  The results are as good as one
>>> can get with practise.
>>>
>>> By the way, I a working on a kit which can retrofit any existing braille
>>> embosser to produce three-D tactile graphics.  The hardware is not
>>> difficult; the software is a challenge because we’re trying to put new wine
>>> in old wineskins.  The results are like the Tiger’s three-D graphics,
>>> except that any braillle embosser can be fitted with the adaptation.  Not
>>> there yet for selling, but the principle does work.
>>>
>>> Charles
>>>
>>>
>>>
>>>  *From:* Lucia Hasty <lucia@xxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxx>
>>> *Sent:* Tuesday, January 17, 2012 1:09 PM
>>> *To:* accessibleimage@xxxxxxxxxxxxx
>>> *Subject:* [accessibleimage] Re: SV: Re: Thermo-Pen and Draftsman
>>>
>>>   I concur with Susan- the Draftsman is an excellent tool. It may be
>>> out of price range for individuals, however. Charles described what sounds
>>> like a Sewell Raised Line Drawing Board with mylar sheets, no longer
>>> produced/sold in the US.
>>>
>>> As a replacement (and improvement), Ann Cunningham has recently
>>> developed the Sensational Blackboard which is a rubbery surface on a stiff
>>> base. The surface is inherently non-slip, so no clamps or screw-down
>>> holders are required. Images are drawn on ordinary printer/copier paper
>>> using a ballpoint pen, similar to Charles' swag method. Available from
>>> http://sensationalbooks.com/
>>>
>>> Happy drawing!
>>> Lucia
>>> Lucia Hasty
>>> Rocky Mountain Braille Associates
>>> Lucia@xxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxx
>>> http://tactilegraphics.org
>>>
>>>
>>> On Tue, Jan 17, 2012 at 4:50 AM, Lisa Yayla <Lisa.Yayla@xxxxxxxxxx>wrote:
>>>
>>>> Hi Charles,
>>>>
>>>> Liked your swag method.
>>>>
>>>> Regards,
>>>>
>>>> Lisa
>>>>
>>>>
>>>>
>>>> -----Opprinnelig melding-----
>>>> Fra: accessibleimage-bounce@xxxxxxxxxxxxx [mailto:
>>>> accessibleimage-bounce@xxxxxxxxxxxxx] På vegne av Jaquiss, Robert
>>>> Sendt: 16. januar 2012 15:33
>>>> Til: accessibleimage@xxxxxxxxxxxxx
>>>> Emne: [accessibleimage] Re: Thermo-Pen and Draftsman
>>>>
>>>> Hello Maureen:
>>>>
>>>>     The Thermopen is from Repro-tronics. The web site is:
>>>> http://www.repro-tronics.com
>>>>
>>>> Hope this helps.
>>>>
>>>> Regards,
>>>>
>>>> Robert
>>>>
>>>>
>>>> Robert Jaquiss
>>>> National Federation of the Blind
>>>> 200 East Wells Street at Jernigan Place
>>>> Baltimore, Maryland 21230
>>>> Phone: 410-659-9314, ext. 2422
>>>>
>>>>
>>>> -----Original Message-----
>>>> From: accessibleimage-bounce@xxxxxxxxxxxxx [mailto:
>>>> accessibleimage-bounce@xxxxxxxxxxxxx] On Behalf Of Lewicki, Maureen
>>>> Sent: Monday, January 16, 2012 9:17 AM
>>>> To: <accessibleimage@xxxxxxxxxxxxx>
>>>> Subject: [accessibleimage] Re: Thermo-Pen and Draftsman
>>>>
>>>> I have googled the thermo-pen and all I find is the thermapen which is
>>>> a meat thermometer. Are you using this on plastic paper by chance? Would
>>>> this be a viable way for a TVI to produce tactile graphical for students? I
>>>> am thinking about geometry in particular Sent from my iPad
>>>>
>>>> On Jan 15, 2012, at 5:20 PM, "cpond" <cpond@xxxxxxxxx> wrote:
>>>>
>>>> > I use a simular kit.  It consists of a gum rubber surface overlaid on
>>>> a flat mounting surface/holder.  Very thin mylar film is used on which to
>>>> draw. Any pen can be used, although ones with too narrow a tip can poke
>>>> holes in the thin mylar film.  The lines are felt as they are drawn, with
>>>> no need to look at the underside of the mylar in reverse.
>>>> >
>>>> > So, the idea is to draw on something soft in order to distort its
>>>> surface. In electronics school we used, quite successfully, a good "swag"
>>>> method.  WE simply placed a piece of normal paper on an organized pile of
>>>> used paper (used paper is a soft surface even when flat).  We used a
>>>> regular pen and pressed on it firmly as we drew, and the diagrams resulting
>>>> were worthy of a blind tactile king.  Cost nothing except the paper.  Even
>>>> dead pens worked; the goal was tactile lines.
>>>> >
>>>> > Charles
>>>> >
>>>> >
>>>> >
>>>> >
>>>> > -----Original Message----- From: Susan Osterhaus
>>>> > Sent: Friday, January 13, 2012 4
>>>> > To: accessibleimage@xxxxxxxxxxxxx
>>>> > Cc: tvii@xxxxxxxxxxxxx ; Lisa Yayla
>>>> > Subject: [accessibleimage] Thermo-Pen and Draftsman
>>>> >
>>>> > John and Lisa,
>>>> >
>>>> > Are you familiar with the APH Draftsman Tactile Drawing Board? That
>>>> > has spoiled us! Our students can draw free hand or use various math
>>>> > tools to create angles, geometric shapes, parallel lines crossed by a
>>>> > transversal, etc. If you are a student eligible for federal quota
>>>> > money purchases, one can order it with no cost. Otherwise, it is $177
>>>> > USD. Be sure to order extra drawing film (25 sheet packages for $6
>>>> > USD) as you will be tempted to start drawing and never stop. If you
>>>> > are located in Europe, you can purchase the Draftsman from Caretec at:
>>>> > http://www.caretec.at/english.29.0.html and the price is 126.90 Euro.
>>>> > You can purchase 100 drawing sheets for 9.95 Euro.
>>>> >
>>>> > No, I don't work for APH or Caretec. I just love the Draftsman, and
>>>> > I'm one of their best unpaid salespersons.
>>>> >
>>>> > The Thermo-Pen II is available from Reprotronics and costs $135 USD,
>>>> > and you need to also purchase their special Flexi-Paper to use it.
>>>> > Depending on the size you request, the price per page is $.45 - $1.60
>>>> > USD per page, but you have to buy it in quantities of 100, so you will
>>>> > need to spend $45 - $160 USD on your first supply of paper.
>>>> >
>>>> > Susan
>>>> >
>>>> >
>>>> > -----Original Message-----
>>>> > From: accessibleimage-bounce@xxxxxxxxxxxxx
>>>> > [mailto:accessibleimage-bounce@xxxxxxxxxxxxx] On Behalf Of John
>>>> > Panarese
>>>> > Sent: Friday, January 13, 2012 12:20 PM
>>>> > To: accessibleimage@xxxxxxxxxxxxx
>>>> > Subject: [accessibleimage] Re: Thermo-pen question .
>>>> >    They're nice little devices.  As a blind person, it is one of the
>>>> > closest ways I have experienced to drawing free hand.  It takes a
>>>> > little practice to get the hang of using it, but I would highly
>>>> > recommend it.   The tip can get a little warm, but not enough
>>>> > severely hurt oneself and like anything else, with care, it's not an
>>>> > issue at all.
>>>> >
>>>> > Take Care
>>>> >
>>>> > John D. Panarese
>>>> > Director
>>>> > Mac for the Blind
>>>> > Tel, (631) 724-4479
>>>> > Email, john@xxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxx
>>>> > Website, http://www.macfortheblind.com
>>>> >
>>>> >
>>>> > AUTHORIZED APPLE STORE BUSINESS AFFILIATE MAC VOICEOVER TRAINING AND
>>>> > SUPPORT
>>>> >
>>>> >
>>>> >
>>>> >
>>>> > On Jan 13, 2012, at 8:15 AM, Lisa Yayla wrote:
>>>> >
>>>> >> Hi,
>>>> >>
>>>> >> I was wondering if anyone on the list uses a thermo-pen and is blind
>>>> or knows of anyone who does? I was thinking that this could be difficult
>>>> but could very well be wrong so would appreciate any thoughts about this.
>>>> >>
>>>> >> Thanks.
>>>> >>
>>>> >> Regards,
>>>> >>
>>>> >> Lisa
>>>> >>
>>>> >>
>>>> >>
>>>> >> -Scanned by Exchange Hosted Services-
>>>> >
>>>> >
>>>> >
>>>> >
>>>> > --
>>>> > Susan A Osterhaus
>>>> > Statewide Mathematics Consultant
>>>> > Outreach Department
>>>> > Texas School for the Blind
>>>> > and Visually Impaired
>>>> > 1100 West 45th Street
>>>> > Austin, TX 78756
>>>> > Phone: 512-206-9305
>>>> > Fax: 512-206-9320
>>>> > Website: http://www.tsbvi.edu/math
>>>> >
>>>> >
>>>> >
>>>> >
>>>> > -----
>>>> >
>>>> > Checked by AVG - www.avg.com
>>>> > Version: 10.0.1416 / Virus Database: 2109/4140 - Release Date:
>>>> > 01/13/12
>>>> >
>>>> >
>>>> >
>>>>
>>>>
>>>>
>>>> -Scanned by Exchange Hosted Services-
>>>>
>>>>
>>>>
>>>  ------------------------------
>>>
>>>
>>> Checked by AVG - www.avg.com
>>> Version: 10.0.1416 / Virus Database: 2109/4148 - Release Date: 01/17/12
>>>
>>
>>  ------------------------------
>>
>>
>> Checked by AVG - www.avg.com
>> Version: 10.0.1416 / Virus Database: 2109/4148 - Release Date: 01/17/12
>>
>
>
>
> --
> Richard G. Baldwin (Dick Baldwin)
> Home of Baldwin's on-line Java Tutorials
> http://www.DickBaldwin.com
>
> Professor of Computer Information Technology
> Austin Community College
> (512) 223-4758
> mailto:Baldwin@xxxxxxxxxxxxxxx
> http://www.austincc.edu/baldwin/
> ------------------------------
>
>
> Checked by AVG - www.avg.com
> Version: 10.0.1416 / Virus Database: 2109/4148 - Release Date: 01/17/12
>



-- 
Richard G. Baldwin (Dick Baldwin)
Home of Baldwin's on-line Java Tutorials
http://www.DickBaldwin.com

Professor of Computer Information Technology
Austin Community College
(512) 223-4758
mailto:Baldwin@xxxxxxxxxxxxxxx
http://www.austincc.edu/baldwin/

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