[accessibleimage] Re: SV: Re: Term - relief vs tactile

hi lisa,

no, I don't think so. The talking tactile pen is just a description probe
that you use to access labels for the things you are touching.  TTP, TTT
 and other devices that associate spoken description with tactile pictures
are tools that improve comprehension of tactile pictures.

by the way, here are some links to our latest stuff that you may like to
know about:

Talking Tactile Exhibit Panels </>
Perkins School Talking Campus
Model<http://www.touchgraphics.com/research/perkinscampusmodel.html>
BART System maps <http://www.touchgraphics.com/research/bart.html>
Intrepid Air, Sea and Space Museum
Guide<http://www.touchgraphics.com/research/intrepid.html>

We are also about to release new Talking Tactile Pen museum guides for
Boston Museum of Fine Arts and Smithsonian National Air and Space Museum. I
will send you info about those when they are completed.

steve


On Fri, Jan 20, 2012 at 10:29 AM, Lisa Yayla <Lisa.Yayla@xxxxxxxxxx> wrote:

> Hi Steve,****
>
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> OK, haptic out then for the use I was thinking. But would you use haptic
> for the talking tactile pen and tactile graphic used with it? ****
>
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> Thanks,****
>
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> Lisa****
>
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> *Fra:* accessibleimage-bounce@xxxxxxxxxxxxx [mailto:
> accessibleimage-bounce@xxxxxxxxxxxxx] *På vegne av* Steven Landau
> *Sendt:* 20. januar 2012 15:05
>
> *Til:* accessibleimage@xxxxxxxxxxxxx
> *Emne:* [accessibleimage] Re: Term - relief vs tactile****
>
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>
> Hi Lisa,****
>
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>
> Good question. I use the term *tactile graphic* to refer to any touchable
> image, where pictorial or spatial information is intended to be
> communicated through the pressure and abrasion of various materials against
> skin. Haptic is different and adds other sensory channels, such as
> proprioception and balance, so I only use that term when the whole body is
> involved, not just hands and fingers. Under *tactile graphic*, I include
> the various techniques available to designers, including raised-line and
> textured drawing (basically 2D pictures that have been outlined and
> accentuated with touchable features) and *bas-relief* (which accurately
> depicts 3D forms, but with one axis foreshortened). *Models* are fully 3D
> representations, and are probably the easiest to understand through touch.
> ****
>
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>
> steve landau****
>
> touch graphic, inc.****
>
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> On Fri, Jan 20, 2012 at 8:24 AM, Lisa Yayla <Lisa.Yayla@xxxxxxxxxx> wrote:
> ****
>
> Hi,****
>
>  ****
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> Again I am calling to the collective knowledge and wisdom of this group.
> My question is about what to call a tactile graphic. Hmm, you think,
> strange question after all these years and shouldn’t the questioner know
> better?****
>
>  ****
>
> Ok, here are the questions – is the term “tactile graphic” better than the
> term “relief graphic” ? Is the term “haptic graphic” better than both? Or
> does it not make much difference? ****
>
>  ****
>
> By saying tactile one gives the idea that the graphic is to be touched,
> but saying relief, doesn’t necessarily. Haptic perhaps gives the additional
> information that there should be movement to gain information – that is the
> hand should move over the graphic.****
>
>  ****
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> Like to hear what you think.****
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>  ****
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> Thanks,****
>
>  ****
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> Lisa****
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> -Scanned by Exchange Hosted Services- ****
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> -Scanned by Exchange Hosted Services-
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