[accesscomp] Re: SAP Button

I have the radio and it works well.  As far as recommending it is
concerned, all I can tell you is that if you want it, it works well.  but
recommending it compared with a different option such as a converter box
is something I can only say is a decision you will have to make.  As I
indicated in my earlier message, converter boxes are much cheaper.  You
will have to make sure the converter box has a SAP option on the remote. 
If you want an actual radio for some reason, then of course, you would
probably want to get this radio.  If all you want is the ability to
receive television signals from over air broadcasts and you are willing to
connect something to a boom box or stereo or amplified speakers, then a
much cheaper converter box is well worth considering. One advantage of the
radio is that you can scan for stations yourself.  You may be able to scan
for stations yourself using a converter box but a sighted person would
have to go through the procedure for scanning with you and show you every
step and you would have to make notes on those steps for future reference.
 You would have to have the converter box connected to a television so the
sighted person could go through the procedure.  If you don't have a
television where you live, the converter box might loose the results of
the scan when you take it home with you after the scan and you might have
to scan again yourself once it is connected at your house.

the main reason I purchased the radio is because one of my local
television stations doesn't broadcast SAP programming properly.  the
converter box I use keeps reverting to the standard audio channel when
listening to this station.  The radio uses a different encoder and that
problem doesn't occur with that encoder.  In other words, I purchased the
radio in hopes that it would solve a specific technical problem with
receiving a station in my area and it did.  I like the radio but it's very
unlikely I would have spent two hundred dollars for it except for the
technical problem I wanted to solve.

Gene
----- Original Message -----
From: "Sue Buckley" <suebuckley25@xxxxxxxxxxx>
To: <accesscomp@xxxxxxxxxxxxx>
Sent: Tuesday, July 31, 2012 4:18 PM
> Gene
>
> Do you not have this radio? How is the reception in your area of the
> country?
> Sue
> ----- Original Message -----
> From: "Wayne W Hinckley" <wwhinckley@xxxxxxxxx>
> To: <accesscomp@xxxxxxxxxxxxx>
> Sent: Tuesday, July 31, 2012 2:10 PM
> Subject: [accesscomp] Re: SAP Button
>
>
>> Gene,
>>
>> I, too, am impressed with the information in the manual.  Thanks for
>> sending it.
>>
>> Does anyone on this list own this TV radio, and recommend it?
>>
>> Thanks,
>>
>> Wayne
>>
>> ----- Original Message -----
>> From: "Reginald George" <adapt@xxxxxxxxx>
>> To: <accesscomp@xxxxxxxxxxxxx>
>> Sent: Tuesday, July 31, 2012 11:20 AM
>> Subject: [accesscomp] Re: SAP Button
>>
>>
>>> Thanks so much for sending along this manual.  Itâ??s a testament to
>>> the
>>> quality of the product, as well as the care and thought with which it
>>> was
>>> created specifically for us.  I commend Richard and his company for
>>> writing one of the best manuals ever written, and creating a pretty
>>> cool
>>> little radio.
>>>
>>> It also confirms what most of us already knew, that the entire country
>>> of
>>> rural over the air users got absolutely reamed by the F.C.C. when they
>>> switched to digital and sold off the spectrum, leaving everyone with
>>> weak
>>> horrible difficult to receive television signals that are best viewed
>>> by
>>> cable and satellite users who must pay money for the privilege, and
>>> leaving those who want to exercise their constitutional right to
>>> receive
>>> free over the air television suffering with inferior signals that
>>> disappear every time the wind blows.  What possible good does it do to
>>> have all these channels if no one can pick them up reliably!  Next they
>>> will probably ruin terrestrial radio!  Sorry, I'll get off my soapbox
>>> now. All this being said, if you read down far enough Richard gives the
>>> best description I've ever read of the differences between the way
>>> digital and analog television works.
>>>
>>> Reg
>>>
>>>
>>>
>>> -----Original Message-----
>>> From: Gene
>>> Sent: Tuesday, July 31, 2012 10:44 AM
>>> To: accesscomp@xxxxxxxxxxxxx
>>> Subject: [accesscomp] Re: SAP Button
>>>
>>> Just because one converter box failed doesn't tell you anything about
>>> whether others will.  Would you not purchase a new refrigerator if your
>>> current one broke?  Would you avoid purchasing any mp3 players if one
>>> broke?  Any single product may be defective.  A model of a product may
>>> have problems.  That has nothing to do with whether the product in
>>> general
>>> should be avoided.
>>>
>>> I'll send you information about the radio.  It is a copy of the manual.
>>> I
>>> won't send it as an attachment.  I'll include it in this message.  It
>>> contains contact information if you decide to buy one of the radios and
>>> it
>>> contains the operating instructions.  It may help you decide if you
>>> want
>>> it.  The radio costs about 150 dollars more than a converter box.  And
>>> anything you buy, a television, a converter box or the radio will use
>>> similar technology to decode the analog.  You are buying the equivalent
>>> of
>>> the main part of a converter box regardless of what you buy except that
>>> if
>>> you buy a television, you are buying a converter box built into a
>>> television and if you buy the radio, you are buying a converter box
>>> built
>>> into a radio.
>>>
>>> Here is the manual
>>>
>>> Gene
>>> Richard Oehm    E-mail: oehmelec@xxxxxxxxxxx<P><HR></P>Oehm Electronics
>>>
>>> DTV radio
>>>
>>> model ATSC-25
>>>
>>> Please read this instructions manual before operating your new DTV
>>> radio.
>>> If you have any questions or need help with radio operation, please
>>> feel
>>> free to call Oehm Electronics at (408) 971-6250 Monday Through Saturday
>>> between the hours of #8-A.M. and #8-P.M. If you do this, chances are,
>>> you
>>> will be able to talk with a real live knowledgeable person who can help
>>> you. If when you call, you're prompted to leave a message, a real live
>>> knowledgeable person who can help you will return your call as soon as
>>> possible. A real live knowledgeable person is also available to answer
>>> questions about your radio via E-Mail as well. If you prefer, E-Mail
>>> any
>>> questions you may have about your new radio to "oehmelec@xxxxxxxxxxx".
>>>
>>>  Table Of Contents
>>>
>>> introduction...............#3
>>>
>>> keypad description.........#12
>>>
>>> installation and setup.....#19
>>>
>>> first time channel search
>>>
>>> (menu "#5" "#1" "#1")...#22
>>>
>>> selecting and listening to
>>>
>>> TV channels.............#26
>>>
>>> DTV reception............#33
>>>
>>> searching for and
>>>
>>> adding channels (menu
>>>
>>> "#5" "#1" "#2" "#1")....#47
>>>
>>> selecting alternate audio..#49
>>>
>>> connecting audio devices...#52
>>>
>>> using your radio with the
>>>
>>> model BP-#25
>>>
>>> external battery pack...#55
>>>
>>> safety considerations......#56
>>>
>>> FCC information............#60
>>>
>>> warranty..................#62
>>>
>>>  Introduction
>>>
>>> Thank you for purchasing the Oehm Electronics model ATSC-25 DTV
>>> (digital
>>> television) radio. This radio allows you to listen too and enjoy off
>>> air
>>> digital television program broadcasts available in the United States,
>>> Canada and other countries employing the ATSC standards adopted and
>>> created by the (Advanced Television Standards Committee. This radio
>>> receives terrestrial digital TV broadcasts that employ the "8VSB"
>>> digital
>>> TV transmission standard. This is the new digital TV transmission
>>> format
>>> that nearly all of the TV stations located in the United States began
>>> using exclusively after the DTV transition in June of the year 2009.
>>> This
>>> DTV radio is designed to receive VHF and UHF ATSC DTV channels #2
>>> through
>>> #69. It will also receive all of the available sub-channels (which are
>>> the
>>> additional multicasts) offered by each terrestrial TV station), and it
>>> will also receive all available alternate audio programs provided by
>>> these
>>> television stations as well. At present, our DTV ra!
>>> dio is not able to receive and decode television signals employing the
>>> 16VSB or 256QAM transmission standards used by cable tv companies. This
>>> means that this radio will not provide you access to your cable
>>> companies
>>> digital cable TV offerings. All functions and features of this radio
>>> are
>>> controlled via a front panel keypad with 27 keys. The radio sports a
>>> telescoping whip antenna used for receiving DTV broadcasts originating
>>> from locations close to the radio. This telescoping whip antenna can be
>>> easily disconnected from the radio and a better quality active indoor
>>> antenna or outdoor antenna can be substituted to obtain reception of
>>> more
>>> distant DTV stations. The radios rear panel also has two RCA type
>>> connectors allowing connection of this radio to stereo amplifiers,
>>> stereo
>>> receivers, and or amplified stereo speakers. There is also a front
>>> panel
>>> "external speaker" jack which can be used to connect this radio to an
>>> external speaker, mono headset or a listening device for f!
>>> olks with hearing difficulties.
>>>
>>> This radio is housed in a wooden and plastic cabinet measuring
>>> approximately twelve inches wide, eight inches high and approximately
>>> nine
>>> inches deep. The front panel of this radio is divided into two
>>> sections.
>>> The right half of the front panel consists of a open box type frame
>>> that
>>> contains the keypad with its 27 keys. This keypad is recessed slightly
>>> within this box like frame at the far right of the enclosure. To the
>>> left
>>> of this keypad is the "External speaker" jack used to connect the radio
>>> to
>>> a mono headset, external speaker or other listening device. This front
>>> panel female jack is a 1/8 inch mono connector. It accommodates the 1/8
>>> inch mono type plugs used by a wide variety of portable electronics.
>>> When
>>> an appropriate plug from an external speaker, mono headset or other
>>> listening device is inserted into this front panel jack, sound from the
>>> radio's internal speaker is silenced and this audio is routed to the
>>> listening device connected to this front panel connector. T!
>>> he volume control of the radio controls the audio level available from
>>> this front panel 1/8 inch female type audio connector. To the left of
>>> this box like frame is the radios speaker. The radios speaker occupies
>>> the left half of the front of the radio. There are four small rubber
>>> feet
>>> on the bottom of the radio, one in each corner of the bottom of the
>>> radio. These rubber feet provide protection for the table top or other
>>> surface where the radio is placed. Care should be taken to ensure that
>>> the radio is only placed upon stable completely flat surfaces.
>>> Near the top of the far right side of the radio's rear panel is the
>>> cable
>>> and F type male connector for the radios telescoping whip antenna. This
>>> cable and connector from the radio's telescoping whip antenna protrude
>>> from a hole at the far right edge of the radios rear panel. When in
>>> use,
>>> The F type male antenna connector from this telescoping whip antenna
>>> simply slides over the radio's rear panel female F type threaded
>>> "antenna"
>>> rear panel jack. This antenna jack is located fairly close too and just
>>> to
>>> the left of the location where the internal telescoping whip antenna
>>> with
>>> its cable and connector exit the radio. When the radio's telescoping
>>> whip
>>> antenna is not being used, this cable with F type male connector simply
>>> hangs and dangles freely from the rear panel of the radio. Care should
>>> be
>>> taken when connecting any type of antenna to the radio, to insure that
>>> the
>>> center pin of the male plug from the antenna cable lines up with the
>>> hole
>>> in the center of the F type female re!
>>> ar panel jack which is designed to accept it. Being sure that this pin
>>> is
>>> lined up correctly and inserted properly into the radio's rear panel
>>> antenna female jack will insure good TV channel reception. Some F type
>>> male connector plugs utilize a threaded collar that must be tightened
>>> over the radio's rear panel threaded connector. Other F type male
>>> connector plugs are like that which is employed by the radio's
>>> telescoping whip antenna and these F type male connector plugs just
>>> simply slide onto the threaded outer surface of your radio's rear panel
>>> F
>>> type female jack connector. The radio sports a telescoping whip antenna
>>> located on top of the radio at the far right rear corner of the radio
>>> cabinet. This telescoping whip antenna can be swiveled/tilted in two
>>> directions and can also be turned/oriented a full 360 degrees for best
>>> tv
>>> channel reception. The height of this telescoping whip antenna when
>>> fully
>>> extended is approximately 43 inches in length. This antenna is useful
>>> when!
>>>  the radio is being used in a location that is within approximately
>>> twenty miles or less from the television stations you want to receive.
>>> The performance, reception range and usefulness of this telescoping
>>> whip
>>> antenna is dependent upon many factors: including the height of a
>>> particular television stations transmitting antenna, any obstructions
>>> in
>>> the path between this TV stations transmitting antenna and the radio,
>>> and the power of the TV stations transmitter. Oehm Electronics suggests
>>> that an outdoor TV antenna or active indoor tv antenna be used with
>>> this
>>> radio, in locations where it is not possible to receive all of the
>>> television channels you'd like to listen too when using the radios
>>> telescoping whip antenna. Because this antenna is connected to the
>>> radio
>>> via a rear panel F type RF connector, this telescoping whip antenna can
>>> be easily disconnected and a superior outdoor or active indoor TV
>>> antenna can be connected to the radio to make longer distance reception
>>> possible.
>>>
>>> Just below the "antenna" connector on the radio's rear panel is the "DC
>>> power" connector. This connector is used to connect power to the radio,
>>> and is labeled "+#9VDC in". It is designed to be connected to the
>>> supplied
>>> AC to DC power adapter. You should only use the supplied AC to DC
>>> adapter
>>> when powering this radio from regular AC power mains. The supplied AC
>>> to
>>> DC adapter is a surge protected and regulated 9 volt DC power supply.
>>> Connecting a DC power source with a different polarity or higher
>>> voltage
>>> than the supplied Oehm Electronics AC to DC adapter power supply, will
>>> damage your radio and void your warranty. This "+#9VDC in" connector
>>> can
>>> also be connected to an Oehm Electronics battery pack (part number
>>> BP-25)
>>> which can power the radio for several hours with six standard D size
>>> flashlight batteries. This battery pack is not included with your radio
>>> and is an option which you can purchase if you're interested in
>>> operating
>>> your radio from battery power. See the section!
>>>  of this instructions manual titled "Using An External Battery" for
>>> more
>>> information about this.
>>>
>>> Near the bottom right edge of the radio's rear panel are two RCA type
>>> female jacks/connectors. These are external audio connectors which you
>>> can
>>> use to connect your radio to stereo amplifiers, and stereo receivers.
>>> With
>>> the right audio adapters, you can also use these rear panel RCA
>>> connectors
>>> to connect your radio to amplified stereo speakers or even a pair of
>>> stereo headphones. See the section of these instructions entitled
>>> "connecting audio devices" for more information. When appropriate RCA
>>> type
>>> male plugs are inserted into these rear panel female connectors, sound
>>> from the radio's speaker is extinguished. The volume control of the
>>> radio
>>> controls the audio level available from these rear panel stereo RCA
>>> type
>>> connectors.
>>>
>>> keypad description
>>>
>>> The twenty seven key keypad controls and provides access to all
>>> features,
>>> functions and operations of this radio. We realize that twenty seven
>>> keys
>>> to control a radio seems daunting and a bit over complicated,but the
>>> fact
>>> that six of these keys are not used and have no purpose for operating
>>> this
>>> radio, may help to make things seem a bit simpler. After all, the total
>>> number of keys you need to become familiar with, is actually twenty
>>> one.
>>> If you consider that ten of these remaining twenty one keys are numeric
>>> keys, that reduces the number of keys you need to learn about to
>>> eleven.
>>> Why did we choose to use a twenty seven key keypad when only twenty one
>>> keys were needed? The twenty seven key keypad is a standard off the
>>> shelf
>>> component that is inexpensive and readily available. By using this
>>> inexpensive readily available component we're able to offer you this
>>> DTV
>>> radio for less than $200.00. If we had to design and build a custom
>>> made
>>> twenty one key keypad, we'd have to pay a g!
>>> reat deal more to manufacture this radio and pass these increased costs
>>> on to you. At Oehm Electronics we strive to provide the highest quality
>>> products at the lowest possible prices.
>>> Starting at the very top of this keypad, you will find two rather large
>>> square keys. The key at the left is labeled "audio mute". (Pressing
>>> this
>>> key while listening to the radio will cause the audio to disappear.
>>> Pressing this button once more will restore the radio audio at exactly
>>> the
>>> same volume it was set too before the first press of this button.) The
>>> large square key at the top right is labeled "power". (Pressing this
>>> key
>>> toggles the radio on and off.) Below these larger square keys are two
>>> much
>>> smaller square keys. One of these small square keys is below and to the
>>> left of the "audio mute" key, and the other small square key is located
>>> below and to the right of the "power" key. The small square key located
>>> below and left of the "audio mute" key is labeled "menu". (This "menu"
>>> key
>>> is used in conjunction with some numeric keys to perform the two types
>>> of
>>> channel searches discussed later in this instructions manual.) The
>>> small
>>> square key below and to the right of the "po!
>>> wer" key is labeled "exit". (This "exit" key is used to return the
>>> radio
>>> to its normal TV audio mode of operation after you use the radio's
>>> "signal quality check" feature.) This "signal quality check" feature
>>> will
>>> be described very soon. Below the two large and two small square keys
>>> just discussed is a circle of five keys. There are four wedge shaped
>>> keys
>>> arranged in a circle surrounding a fifth round circular key. These four
>>> wedge shaped keys are meant to be "up" "down" "left" and "right" arrow
>>> or
>>> cursor keys. These keys have no purpose in the operation of our radio.
>>> The fifth round key located in the center of the four wedge shaped keys
>>> is the "enter" key. (this "enter" key is used to toggle through the
>>> available alternate audio programs when the radio is tuned to and
>>> receiving a television channel. Each press of this key selects one of
>>> the
>>> audio programs available for the television channel selected. See the
>>> section of this instructions manual about "selecting alternate !
>>> audio programs" for more information. This "enter" key is also used to
>>> place the radio into its normal TV audio mode after a channel search
>>> has
>>> been completed.) Below and to the left of this circle of cursor keys
>>> surrounding the "enter key, is a small square key the same size as the
>>> "menu" key and "exit" key just discussed. This small square key below
>>> and
>>> to the left of the circle of keys is labeled "info". (This key is not
>>> used and has no purpose for the operation of our radio.) Below and to
>>> the
>>> right of the circle of cursor keys surrounding the "enter key, is
>>> another
>>> small square key the same size as the "info" key just discussed. This
>>> small square key below and to the right of the circle of keys and to
>>> the
>>> right of the "info" key, is labeled "signal". (When this key is
>>> pressed,
>>> the radio will emit a tone whose pitch is a relative indicator of
>>> signal
>>> quality. Pressing this key will cause an audio tone to be heard through
>>> the radios speaker. The pitch of this audible tone will increase when
>>> the
>>> signal from the channel being received is stron!
>>> ger and the quality of the data being received by the radio is better
>>> with fewer errors. The pitch of this audible tone will decrease if the
>>> signal strength of the selected channel decreases and the quality of
>>> the
>>> data being received by the radio degrades. This is a useful feature
>>> when
>>> you need to orient the radio's antenna for best possible reception of
>>> the
>>> channel you're listening too. Pressing the "exit" key discussed
>>> earlier,
>>> will turn off this signal strength indicator, and return you to the TV
>>> channel you were previously listening too.) On the left side of the key
>>> pad just below the small square "info" key just mentioned, is a rather
>>> large square key labeled "volume up". (Pressing this key will increase
>>> the audio volume from the radio.) The large square key just below this
>>> "volume up" key is the "volume down" key. (Pressing this key will
>>> decrease the audio volume from the radio.) To the right of the "volume
>>> up" key is another rather large square key labeled "channel u!
>>> p". (pressing this button will cause the radio to select and tune to
>>> the
>>> next highest available numeric channel. For example, if the radio is
>>> tuned to channel 7-1, pressing this "channel up" key would cause the
>>> radio to select channel 7-2, if this channel exists.) Just below the
>>> "channel up" key and to the right of the "volume down" key is a large
>>> square key labeled "channel down". (pressing this key will cause the
>>> radio to select and tune to the next lower available numeric channel.
>>> For
>>> example, if the radio is tuned to channel 7-2, pressing this "channel
>>> down" key would cause the radio to select channel 7-1.) The twelve
>>> rectangular keys below the "volume down" and "channel down" keys
>>> consist
>>> of the numeric keys that are used to select your desired channel. These
>>> keys are arranged and configured in four rows of three keys each just
>>> like the numeric keys on a touch tone telephone. This means that the
>>> first three keys in the first row of keys below the "volume down" key
>>> and
>>> "channel down" key are keys #1, #2 and #3. The #1 key is at the far
>>> lef!
>>> t of this row and the "#3" key is at the right edge of this first row
>>> of
>>> keys. The "zero" key is the center key in the bottom row of three keys.
>>> The key to the left of this "zero" key is labeled "CC". (This key is
>>> not
>>> used and has no purpose for the operation of our radio.) The key to the
>>> right of the "zero" key is the dash ("-") key. (This key is used when
>>> entering the channel number you want the radio to receive. If this key
>>> is
>>> pressed by itself without pressing any other keys, this key will cause
>>> the radio to select the previous channel it was tuned too.)
>>>
>>> The Braille chart enclosed and included with your radio is intended to
>>> illustrate the locations of all of the keys on your radio's keypad. It
>>> is
>>> hoped that this Braille chart will help you to familiarize yourself
>>> with
>>> your radio's keypad and even memorize the location of these keys.
>>>
>>>
>>> Installation And Setup
>>>
>>> When you receive and unpack your radio, you should find in the shipping
>>> carton the radio, an AC to DC adapter power supply for the radio, a
>>> Braille chart that depicts the location of the keys on the radio's
>>> keypad
>>> and this instructions manual unless you requested these users
>>> instructions
>>> be provided to you in ASCII text format. If you requested a users
>>> instructions manual in Braille, audio compact disk or ink print, they
>>> should be included with your radio. If you requested your users
>>> instructions manual in ascii text format, these instructions were
>>> E-Mailed
>>> to you at some point before you received your radio and consequently
>>> these
>>> users instructions would not be included with your radio's shipment.
>>>
>>> After unpacking your radio and verifying that you have all of these
>>> items,
>>> plug the supplied AC to DC adapter power supply into your radio and
>>> connect it to a suitable #120VAC power source. Next, either connect the
>>> radio's telescoping whip antenna to the radio and fully extend this
>>> antenna, or if you have a high quality active indoor TV antenna or have
>>> access to an outdoor TV antenna connect one of these superior TV
>>> antennas
>>> to your radio instead. Now turn the radio on by pressing the "power"
>>> button on your radio's keypad. Unless you're fortunate enough to reside
>>> in
>>> the San Francisco bay area where your radio was built and tested, your
>>> radio will give you the silent treatment after you turn it on. You
>>> might
>>> hear a slight pop from the speaker of the radio when you pressed the
>>> "power" key, but unless you live in the San Francisco bay area, your
>>> radio
>>> will be silent. If your radio is giving you the silent treatment, you
>>> will
>>> need to perform a "channel search" Before you'll be !
>>> able to use and enjoy your radio. If you want to confirm that your
>>> radio
>>> is turned on and working at this point, you can if you like press the
>>> "signal" button on your radio's keypad. If you do this, you should hear
>>> a
>>> low tone emanating from the speaker of your radio. You can use your
>>> radio's volume controls to control the volume level of this tone. You
>>> will need to press the "exit" button on the radio's keypad to
>>> extinguish
>>> this tone and insure that your radio is ready to perform a "channel
>>> search".
>>>
>>> first time channel search
>>> (menu-#511)
>>>
>>> With your radio turned on and with a suitable TV antenna connected to
>>> your
>>> radio, you can now perform a "channel search". During this "channel
>>> search", your radio will erase any and all useless information about
>>> previously stored channels that might be in the radios memory, and find
>>> and store all of the current channels the radio can now receive at its
>>> new
>>> location. All DTV receivers must perform this channel search before
>>> they
>>> can be used. To initiate a "channel search" with your radio, press the
>>> following keys on your radio's keypad in this exact order. First press
>>> the
>>> "menu" key. Next, press key "#5". Now, press the "#1" key. Finally,
>>> press
>>> this "#1" key once again. Your radio will now quietly perform a channel
>>> search. Typically, it takes the DTV radio approximately two and a half
>>> minutes to perform a "channel search". It is necessary to perform this
>>> "channel search", whenever you move the radio to a new geographic
>>> location, upgrade or change the TV antenna connected to t!
>>> he radio, or when you just want to see if new channels are available.
>>>
>>> In the old days of analog television, the channel number assigned to a
>>> television station was directly related to the slice of frequency
>>> spectrum
>>> the TV station was licensed to occupy. Hence, in those old days, the
>>> frequency assignment for channel #2 in New York City was the same as
>>> that
>>> assigned to TV channel #2 in Los Angeles and to any TV station
>>> identified
>>> as channel #2 anywhere in the United States. In those days, if you
>>> tuned
>>> your television set or TV radio to the frequency assigned to channel
>>> #2,
>>> you would receive the television station identifying itself as channel
>>> #2
>>> in your local area if there was a channel #2 in your local area. When
>>> digital television was adopted, this relationship between a stations
>>> channel number and the frequency it was assigned to occupy was
>>> abandoned.
>>> Today, a TV station identifying itself as channel #4 located in Seattle
>>> will have a different frequency assignment than a television station
>>> identifying itself as channel #4 in San Francisco. T!
>>> here is no longer any relationship between the channel number being
>>> used
>>> by a television station and its frequency assignment. It is now
>>> possible
>>> for the television station referring to itself as channel #2 in New
>>> York
>>> City to be using the same assigned frequency as another television
>>> station in Chicago referring to itself as channel #53. Today, every
>>> digital television station in the United States continuously broadcasts
>>> a
>>> repetitive data stream that contains its call letters, channel number
>>> and
>>> programming information. When your radio performs a "channel search" it
>>> scans all possible television frequency assignments searching for these
>>> identifying data streams. When it finds one of these data streams, it
>>> logs this data into its memory along with the frequency allocation
>>> where
>>> the channel can be found. After the "channel search has been completed,
>>> the radio will know where to find a particular channel when you enter
>>> that channel number on the radio's keypad. The big advant!
>>> age of this scheme to the Federal Communications Commission is that
>>> they
>>> can auction off and reassign unused television frequency allocations in
>>> a
>>> particular local area, without this activity being noticed or
>>> bothersome
>>> to a TV viewer. The disadvantage of this scheme is that if a new
>>> television station begins broadcasting in your area, no matter how
>>> close
>>> this station might be to you, you will not be aware of its existence
>>> unless you've used the "channel search" function on your DTV radio or
>>> television set after this TV station has begun broadcasting.
>>>
>>> As mentioned previously, it takes your radio approximately two and a
>>> half
>>> minutes to complete its "channel search" so wait approximately three
>>> minutes after you've initiated this "channel search" and then press the
>>> "enter" key on your radio's keypad. Pressing this "enter" button on the
>>> radios key pad will allow you to hear audio from the first or lowest
>>> numbered channel the radio is capable of receiving. It may take as much
>>> as
>>> two or three seconds for this audio to appear after you've pressed the
>>> "enter"key. It's important to note that the only channels that your DTV
>>> radio can receive are the channels it found during its channel search.
>>>
>>> selecting and listening
>>> to TV channels
>>>
>>> There are two methods of selecting the TV channels you want to listen
>>> too
>>> with your radio. You can use the "channel up" and "channel down"
>>> buttons
>>> to explore and discover what's on the air, or you can enter the number
>>> of
>>> the TV channel you'd like to listen too directly with the numeric keys
>>> on
>>> the radio's keypad. Entering the number of the channel you'd like to
>>> listen too is a more certain and direct way of knowing what you're
>>> listening too.
>>>
>>> Depending upon your location and proximity to local TV stations and the
>>> TV
>>> antenna you're using with your radio, you will probably discover that
>>> you
>>> can listen to more tv channels with
>>> your DTV radio than you were previously able to enjoy using
>>> just your analog tv set or analog TV radio. At our Oehm Electronics
>>> location here in San Jose California, we were able to receive seventeen
>>> analog TV channels with an analog tv set before the DTV transition in
>>> June
>>> of 2009. This analog TV set was connected to a thirty year old tv
>>> antenna
>>> located in the attic of our modest two story wood framed building. Now,
>>> With one of our DTV radios connected to this same attic mounted TV
>>> antenna, we can receive seventy two tv channels. This is because the
>>> ATSC
>>> digital broadcast standards for distributing DTV channels allows each
>>> tv
>>> station to multicast additional channels of programming. These same tv
>>> stations could only fit one channel of programming in their allocated
>>> frequency when they were broadcasting the old NTSC analog format, but
>>> with
>>> the 8VSB ATSC digital transmission broadcast format, they can squeeze
>>> as
>>> many as twenty different tv channels and television programs into this
>>> same frequency allocation. Very few tv stations will e!
>>> ver choose to broadcast twenty different channels of programming at the
>>> same time though. Most tv stations choose to broadcast anywhere from
>>> one
>>> to six tv channels of programming in their frequency allocation.
>>> However,
>>> one of the local channels available to us at Oehm Electronics is
>>> choosing
>>> to multicast sixteen different TV channels. These sixteen channels are
>>> part of the seventy two channels that our radio's can receive when
>>> connected to the aforementioned attic antenna. Each additional channel
>>> that a particular tv station chooses to multicast reduces the video
>>> resolution capacity available for each TV program. If a tv station
>>> chooses to multicast more than eight TV programs the video resolution
>>> of
>>> some of these programs will have to be much less than even the old NTSC
>>> standards offered. The main flagship program from each tv station is
>>> always broadcast on their dash one (-1) channel. This means that the
>>> programs that used to be carried on analog channel #7 will now be br!
>>> oadcast on DTV channel #7-1. Similarly the programming that used to be
>>> available on analog channel #11, will now be available on DTV channel
>>> #11-1. After you have operated the "channel search" function on your
>>> radio and are listening to the lowest numbered TV channel found, you
>>> can
>>> switch to channel #7-1 or channel #11-1 if they're available in your
>>> area, by simply entering seven dash one ("#7" "-" "#1") or eleven dash
>>> one ("#1" "#1" "-" "#1") on the keypad of your radio. If either of
>>> these
>>> TV stations are simulcasting additional TV programs, you can select the
>>> additional sub-channels that are carrying these additional TV programs
>>> by
>>> entering either "#7" "-" "#2" or "#1" "#1" "-" "#2" on the radio's
>>> keypad. If these channels are indeed available, your radio will switch
>>> to
>>> them. If these channels don't exist, your radio will remain tuned to
>>> the
>>> channel currently being received. If either of these TV stations in our
>>> example are multicasting a third TV channel, you can select this third
>>> channel by either entering "#7" "-" "#3" or "#1" "#1" "-" "#!
>>> 3" on the radio's keypad. As with the previous example, if these
>>> channels
>>> are indeed available, your radio will switch to them. If these channels
>>> don't exist, your radio will remain tuned to the channel currently
>>> selected. You can employ this method of exploration to discover how
>>> many
>>> additional TV programs (sub-channels) a particular TV station is
>>> offering.
>>>
>>>
>>> Here's another handy shortcut. If you press key "#7" on the keypad of
>>> your
>>> radio without pressing any additional keys, your radio will assume you
>>> want channel #7-1 and will automatically tune to this channel if it can
>>> be
>>> received in your area. Your radio will always tune to the -1 flagship
>>> program channel if just the whole number value is entered.
>>>
>>> You can discover information about some of the available TV channels in
>>> your area by checking the TV program listings for your local area.
>>> These
>>> local TV listings can be found on various internet websites and in
>>> local
>>> newspaper publications. Another source of information regarding local
>>> TV
>>> channels available in your area is the information available at the
>>> "WWW.DTV.GOV" and "WWW.FCC.GOV" websites. Both of these websites allow
>>> you
>>> to enter your city, state and zip code into a search field and the site
>>> returns information about TV channels that might be available in your
>>> area. Even though both of these websites indicated that they returned
>>> this
>>> information in a geographical map format, I found that this information
>>> was easy to read with my Window Eyes screen reading software.
>>> Unfortunately, I found that the information returned by these websites
>>> about local channels available in my area was not as useful or accurate
>>> as
>>> I would have hoped it would be. The information returned !
>>> was a bit out of date, as it didn't include information about a local
>>> DTV
>>> channel that has been on the air in this area for over a year. Could it
>>> really be, the FCC doesn't know about this local DTV station? Another
>>> problem with the local channel information returned by these websites
>>> is
>>> that this information is based upon the assumption that an outdoor
>>> omnidirectional TV antenna 30 feet above the ground is being used with
>>> a
>>> TV receiver. Since it was impractical to make our radio's telescoping
>>> whip antenna extendable to thirty feet, and since most of you will not
>>> usually be listening to your radio outdoors, your mileage may vary from
>>> the results indicated by these websites. If you do use a good quality
>>> active indoor TV antenna or if you have access to an outdoor TV
>>> antenna,
>>> you might be able to obtain reception results that are similar to those
>>> presented by these websites. At the very least, these websites can
>>> provide you with some useful information about local channels th!
>>> at may be available to you.
>>>
>>> DTV reception
>>>
>>> Reception of digital television signals differs a great deal from
>>> analog
>>> TV reception. Analog TV reception starts at excellent and degrades
>>> gradually as the signal from the TV station becomes weaker. Analog TV
>>> reception could also become distorted if the TV signal was being
>>> reflected
>>> and two versions of the analog signal were arriving at the TV antenna
>>> at
>>> slightly different times. This gradual signal degradation and
>>> distortion
>>> resulting from TV signal reflections are impossible outcomes with
>>> digital
>>> TV reception. If the signal from a digital TV station is strong enough
>>> when it reaches the TV antenna, reception will be perfect with
>>> absolutely
>>> no noise or distortions. If signal strength or signal quality is in any
>>> way compromised beyond a certain point reception of this digital
>>> television station will immediately become impossible. When attempting
>>> to
>>> receive digital television signals with indoor antennas at distances
>>> greater than twenty miles from the digital TV stations tran!
>>> smitter, or in areas where Their obstacles between the TV stations
>>> transmitter and the receivers indoor antenna, the difference between
>>> perfect reception of a digital TV signal and no signal being received
>>> at
>>> all can be caused by the slightest of variations in signal reception
>>> conditions. Slight changes in the weather, someone walking in front of
>>> the TV antenna, a slight shift in the location of the TV antenna are
>>> all
>>> factors that can mean the difference between excellent, flawless
>>> reception of a particular DTV channel and no reception at all of this
>>> channel. Using modest indoor TV antennas like the telescoping whip
>>> antenna on your radio when attempting reception of DTV channels farther
>>> than twenty miles or so from the radio can be challenging and requires
>>> patience and luck. In order for DTV reception to occur, the data being
>>> received from the digital TV station, has to be complete, unobstructed
>>> and relatively accurate. Interference and or weak signal conditions
>>> will
>>> comple!
>>> tely eliminate reception of a particular DTV channel. Propagation of TV
>>> channels is considered to be "line of sight" propagation. This means
>>> that
>>> these signals do not bend with the horizon and can be obstructed by
>>> natural and man made obstacles in the path between the TV transmitter
>>> and
>>> the television receiver. This is why television stations locate their
>>> transmission facilities in locations that are as high as possible above
>>> average terrain. These television transmission facilities serve the
>>> geographic areas they overlook. Hills, tall trees, buildings and other
>>> obstructions can block reception of television signals. The higher your
>>> TV antenna the better your reception of television channels will be.
>>> Additionally, reception of television channels will be improved if the
>>> receiving antenna is outdoors or near an exterior wall or window of a
>>> dwelling. In marginal signal reception areas you may find the number of
>>> DTV channels you receive with your radio's telescoping whip antenna
>>> will
>>> be slightly different in different rooms of your house. This is!
>>>  why we recommend that for best reception of DTV channels with your
>>> radio, you should use an outdoor TV antenna or a good quality active
>>> indoor antenna if possible. The radio's telescoping whip antenna is a
>>> convenient way to receive digital TV channels that are close to you,
>>> but
>>> an outdoor TV antenna or a good quality active indoor TV antenna can
>>> really improve your reception of DTV channels.
>>>
>>> There are lots of outdoor and active indoor TV antennas being sold by a
>>> wide variety of vendors. You will obtain the best reception results
>>> with
>>> a
>>> well chosen and installed outdoor TV antenna. It is wise to read
>>> customer
>>> reviews and research product review articles before selecting one of
>>> these
>>> TV antennas. One relatively informative website that might help you do
>>> this is "www.antennasdirect.com". You might also inquire amongst
>>> friends
>>> and neighbors who reside in your area who obtain their TV reception
>>> from
>>> over the air TV channels and not from a cable company or satellite
>>> dish,
>>> to find out what works best for them. Your radio is a digital TV set
>>> without a screen that provides an easy to use interface. This means
>>> that
>>> your radio will perform in a nearly identical manner as any digital TV
>>> set
>>> would when connected to the same TV antenna. When working with outdoor
>>> antennas, don't be confused by the term "digital TV antenna". An
>>> antenna
>>> doesn't care whether the signals it's rece!
>>> iving are digital or not and this term is nearly meaningless when it
>>> comes to the performance of outdoor TV antennas. This is not entirely
>>> the
>>> case when it comes to signal booster amplifiers and active indoor TV
>>> antennas though. DTV reception can often times be adversely affected by
>>> the noise, distortion and phase irregularities that some low quality
>>> signal booster amplifiers introduce. In fact, if you're using an
>>> outdoor
>>> TV antenna with one of these signal booster amplifiers, you may
>>> discover
>>> that you can obtain much better digital TV signal reception without the
>>> signal booster amplifier. A signal booster amplifier that claims it is
>>> designed for Digital TV reception should be quieter and more linear
>>> than
>>> lower quality units. Similarly, a newer active indoor TV antenna may
>>> provide better digital TV reception than one designed and sold during
>>> the
>>> reign of analog television. However, if you happen to have one of these
>>> older antennas lying around, don't hesitate to try it out !
>>> with your radio. At Oehm Electronics we tested about a half dozen
>>> active
>>> indoor antennas currently available on the market. We found that the
>>> best
>>> two active indoor antennas in the small group of a half dozen units we
>>> tested, were the Winegard model SS-3000 active indoor antenna and the
>>> radio shack amplified indoor antenna catalog #15-254. Though we
>>> obtained
>>> marginally better performance from the Winegard indoor antenna and even
>>> though Winegard has a stellar reputation for building high quality
>>> antennas and signal booster amplifiers, we're not recommending this
>>> Winegard antenna. This is because the price of this model SS-3000 from
>>> Winegard is a bit too high at $69.00 and the antenna requires a lot of
>>> assembly to get it put together and working properly. The antenna comes
>>> in several pieces that need to be assembled together. This assembly is
>>> not terribly intuitive and requires the ability to closely observe the
>>> printed illustrations provided in the users instructions manual to
>>> figure
>>> out how it goes together. We do highly recommend the Radio Sh!
>>> ack #15-254 because it performs nearly as well as the Winegard, and its
>>> retail price is only $34.95. At the time of the writing of this manual,
>>> this antenna is on sale at Radio Shack for $24.95. These indoor TV
>>> antennas represent typical examples of what's currently available. Our
>>> test of only a half dozen different active indoor TV antennas isn't
>>> thorough or complete enough to root out and discover the very best
>>> units
>>> available. There are over fifty different makes and models of these
>>> types
>>> of TV antennas readily available, so our test results are simply not
>>> thorough enough to provide this type of information. However, the
>>> following comparison test results will illustrate the points about DTV
>>> reception that we discussed in the previous paragraphs.
>>>
>>> Oehm Electronics is approximately fifteen miles from a few DTV
>>> stations,
>>> and approximately fifty five miles from several other DTV stations. As
>>> mentioned earlier in this manual we are able to receive seventy two DTV
>>> channels with our radio connected to our thirty year old attic antenna.
>>> Downstairs in our shop, using just the radio's telescoping whip antenna
>>> we
>>> were able to receive twenty three digital television channels with our
>>> radio. With the Winegard SS-3000 antenna carefully oriented and
>>> connected
>>> to the radio, we were able to receive thirty four DTV channels. Using
>>> the
>>> Radio Shack #15-254 antenna carefully oriented and with its gain
>>> control
>>> adjusted to maximum, we were also able to receive thirty four DTV
>>> channels. When we took our DTV radio and these two antennas upstairs to
>>> our offices things changed a bit. Using our radio with its Telescoping
>>> whip antenna we were now able to receive forty two DTV channels. With
>>> the
>>> Winegard SS-3000 antenna carefully oriented and con!
>>> nected to the radio, we were able to receive sixty five DTV channels.
>>> Using the Radio Shack #15-254 antenna carefully oriented and with its
>>> gain control adjusted to maximum, we were able to receive sixty two DTV
>>> channels. These test results illustrate the difference that location,
>>> height and antenna quality can make to successful DTV signal reception.
>>> Upstairs in our offices, we were still at least eight feet below our
>>> thirty year old outdoor TV antenna mounted in our attic. It's difficult
>>> to predict what results we might have obtained if we could have taken
>>> our
>>> radio and antennas up to the roof of our building.
>>>
>>> When orienting an antenna for best reception of a DTV channel,
>>> the"signal
>>> quality indicator tones" provided by your DTV radio can be very
>>> helpful.
>>> With your radio tuned to a DTV channel that you'd like to improve your
>>> reception of, press the "signal" button on your radio's keypad.
>>> Pressing
>>> this key will cause an audio tone to be heard through the radios
>>> speaker.
>>> The pitch of this audible tone will increase when the signal from the
>>> channel being received is stronger and the quality of the data being
>>> received by the radio is better with fewer errors. The pitch of this
>>> audible tone will decrease if the signal strength of the selected
>>> channel
>>> decreases and the quality of the data being received by the radio
>>> degrades. When the signal quality indicator tone drops below
>>> approximately
>>> 440 Hertz (concert A on the music scale) reception of the selected DtV
>>> channel will not be possible. If you know the location of the
>>> transmitting
>>> facility of the TV station providing the selected DTV c!
>>> hannel, orienting the antenna for best reception of this selected DTV
>>> channel should also improve reception of all other DTV channels
>>> originating from that location. Since many television stations choose
>>> to
>>> locate their transmitting facilities at the same geographic location,
>>> you
>>> may be able to improve your reception of many DTV channels
>>> simultaneously. When attempting to orient the antenna for best
>>> reception,
>>> (highest pitch tone) it's helpful to keep in mind that the tone is an
>>> indicator of signal quality and not just signal strength. For this
>>> reason, you will notice a very slight approximate 100 millisecond delay
>>> between the movement you make to the antenna and the corresponding
>>> response of the indicator tone. Move slowly and carefully when
>>> orienting
>>> the antenna, and pay close attention to the pitch of the tone as you
>>> adjust the antenna. It can be easy to pass the best orientation
>>> position
>>> if you move things too quickly. Pressing the "exit" key after you've
>>> finished orien!
>>> ting the antenna, will turn off this signal strength indicator tone,
>>> and
>>> return you to the TV channel you were previously listening too. If you
>>> find yourself experimenting with various types of antennas or antenna
>>> orientations, or if you use your radio in more than one location, you
>>> may
>>> want to perform additional channel searches with your radio to see if
>>> you
>>> can receive more and or different DTV channels using different
>>> antennas,
>>> different antenna orientations or by operating your radio from
>>> different
>>> locations around your home. You may not want to lose any of the DTV
>>> channels stored in your radios memory, that can be received with
>>> different antennas or from different locations, you'd just like to
>>> search
>>> for and add new channels that a better antenna or different location
>>> makes it possible for your radio to receive. Fortunately, your radio
>>> can
>>> search for and add new channels without erasing the information already
>>> stored in its memory. The information in the next section of this
>>> instructions manual will describe this very useful feature of yo!
>>> ur radio.
>>>
>>> searching for and adding
>>> TV channels (menu-5121)
>>>
>>> As mentioned at the end of the previous section of this instructions
>>> manual there will be times when you'd like to search for and add DTV
>>> channels to your radio's memory without deleting the channels your
>>> radio
>>> has already found. This would be especially useful if you operate your
>>> radio from a variety of different locations around your home or use
>>> your
>>> radio with different TV antennas. You may also wish to perform a
>>> channel
>>> search periodically just to see if new channels have become available
>>> in
>>> your area. To initiate a "channel search" that adds new channels
>>> without
>>> deleting any of the channels currently stored in your radio's memory,
>>> press the following keys on your radio's keypad in this exact order.
>>> First
>>> press the "menu" key. Next, press key "#5". Now, press the "#1" key.
>>> Next
>>> press the "#2" key. Finally, press the "#1" key once again. Your radio
>>> will now quietly perform a channel search adding any new channels it
>>> finds
>>> to its memory without deleting previously stored c!
>>> hannel information. Wait three minutes and then press the "enter" key
>>> on
>>> your radio's keypad. Pressing this "enter" key after three minutes will
>>> cause your radio to select the lowest numbered channel from the list of
>>> DTV channel assignments stored in its memory. Your radio will not
>>> automatically select any of the new channels it might have just found,
>>> unless a newly found channel turns out to be the lowest numbered
>>> channel
>>> on the list of its memorized channels. You will need to perform some
>>> exploration to find out whether your radio found and added additional
>>> channels to its memory during this "channel search".
>>>
>>> Important Warning:
>>>
>>> Do not perform this "add channels search" if you are operating your
>>> radio
>>> from a geographic location significantly different from where you've
>>> been
>>> using your radio previously. If you move your radio to a completely new
>>> location (to another city or town for example) perform the "first time
>>> channel search" ("menu" "#5" "#1" "#1") described earlier in this
>>> manual.
>>> The "first time channel search ("menu" "#5" "#1" "#1")" will delete all
>>> previously stored DTV channel information in your radio's memory. This
>>> is
>>> exactly what you want to happen if you take your radio to a new
>>> geographic
>>> location. If your radio's memory has information in it about two
>>> different
>>> TV stations identifying themselves as channel #5 for example, when you
>>> attempt to select this channel with your radio's keypad, the radio will
>>> not know which channel #5 to select and will malfunction and stop
>>> working
>>> properly. To prevent this, always perform the "first time channel
>>> search
>>> ("menu" "#5 "#1" "#1") when operating !
>>> your radio from a new geographic location.
>>>
>>> selecting alternate audio
>>>
>>> If alternate audio programs are available on any DTV channel, your
>>> radio
>>> can easily receive these additional audio programs. Up to ten mono or 5
>>> stereo alternate audio programs can be offered by each DTV channel.
>>> Most
>>> DTV channels offer anywhere from no additional programs to three
>>> additional audio programs. When offered, these additional audio
>>> programs
>>> can be a foreign language soundtrack for the TV program being aired or
>>> one
>>> of these additional audio programs could contain audio descriptions of
>>> the
>>> on screen action for the TV program being broadcast. You can select any
>>> of
>>> these alternate audio programs if they are available for the TV channel
>>> you're listening too by pressing the "enter" key on the keypad of your
>>> radio. Pressing the "enter" key will allow you to toggle through any
>>> available alternate audio programs. Each press of the "enter key
>>> selects
>>> one of the audio programs available from the television channel
>>> selected.
>>> If no alternate audio programs exist for the TV p!
>>> rogram you're listening too, nothing will happen when you press the
>>> "enter" key. If one or more alternate audio programs exist, you will
>>> hear
>>> a slight interruption in the audio from your radio as a different audio
>>> program is selected. If you continue pressing the "enter" key you will
>>> toggle through all of the additional audio programs offered for the
>>> channel you're listening too and wind up back on the primary audio
>>> program for the selected TV channel. Don't be surprised or alarmed if
>>> you
>>> press the "enter" key and suddenly your radio becomes silent. At Oehm
>>> Electronics we've noticed that some of our local PBS television
>>> channels
>>> leave their alternate audio channels activated even when they're not
>>> using them to broadcast an alternate audio program. We've also noticed
>>> that some of the major commercial network stations simply simulcast
>>> their
>>> main audio program offering on their alternate audio channels when they
>>> don't have any alternate audio programs available. When you toggl!
>>> e through the additional alternate audio program channels that a
>>> selected
>>> TV channel is offering, you never know what you might find.
>>> Unfortunately, your radio doesn't maintain your alternate audio
>>> selection
>>> when you select a different TV channel or when you turn off your radio.
>>> If you change the channel or turn off your radio you will need to use
>>> the
>>> "enter" key to re-select the alternate audio program you had been
>>> listening too. This is true even if you use the "dash" key on the
>>> keypad
>>> to return to this previous channel. The radio always defaults to the
>>> main
>>> audio program when the channel is changed or the radio is powered on.
>>>
>>> connecting audio devices
>>>
>>> Your DTV radio provides two connections for sending its audio to other
>>> devices. On the front panel of your radio just to the left of the
>>> keypad
>>> is an "External speaker" jack used to connect the radio to a mono
>>> headset,
>>> external speaker or other listening device. This front panel female
>>> jack
>>> is a 1/8 inch mono connector. It accommodates the 1/8 inch mono type
>>> plugs
>>> used by a wide variety of portable electronics. When an appropriate
>>> plug
>>> from an external speaker, mono headset or other listening device is
>>> inserted into this front panel jack, sound from the radio's internal
>>> speaker is silenced and this audio is routed to the listening device
>>> connected to this front panel connector. The volume control of the
>>> radio
>>> controls the audio level available from this front panel 1/8 inch
>>> female
>>> type audio connector. High quality stereo audio is also available from
>>> your radio via its rear panel two RCA type female jacks/connectors.
>>> These
>>> are "external audio" connectors which you can use to!
>>>  connect your radio directly to stereo amplifiers, and stereo
>>> receivers.
>>> With the right audio adapters you can also use these rear panel RCA
>>> connectors to connect your radio to amplified stereo speakers or even a
>>> pair of stereo headphones. You can do this by using a patch cord (like
>>> the radio shack catalog #42492) which has two male RCA connectors that
>>> can be plugged into your radio's rear panel female RCA jacks. The other
>>> end of this cord has a 1/8 inch stereo male plug that can be turned
>>> into
>>> a female jack connector with a stereo audio coupler adapter (like the
>>> Radio Shack catalog #274-1555) which will turn the 1/8 inch stereo male
>>> end of this patch cord into a 1/8 inch female jack allowing connection
>>> of your radio to amplified stereo speakers or a pair of stereo
>>> headphones. When appropriate RCA type male plugs are inserted into
>>> these
>>> rear panel female connectors, sound from the radio's speaker is
>>> extinguished. The volume control of the radio controls the audio level
>>> ava!
>>> ilable from these rear panel stereo RCA type connectors. When your
>>> radio
>>> is connected to a stereo amplifier or receiver, adjust your radio's
>>> volume control so that the audio level coming from your radio matches
>>> the
>>> audio level of your other stereo audio components. This will insure
>>> that
>>> audio from your radio is at the same level as the other audio sources
>>> you
>>> listen to from your stereo system. When connecting your radio to
>>> amplified stereo speakers or stereo headphones, use your radio's volume
>>> controls to obtain a comfortable listening level from these devices.
>>>
>>> using your radio with the
>>> BP-#25 external battery pack
>>> If you'd like to be able to use your radio during power outages or if
>>> you'd like to operate your radio where AC power is not available, you
>>> can
>>> purchase the Oehm Electronics model BP-25 battery pack. This external
>>> battery pack connects to your radio's rear panel "+#9VDC in" power jack
>>> and it can power your radio for several hours from six standard D size
>>> flashlight batteries.
>>>
>>> Important Warning: You will want to connect this external battery pack
>>> to
>>> your radio only when you intend to use it on battery power. After
>>> you've
>>> finished using your radio and turned it off, be sure to disconnect this
>>> battery pack from your radio. Do not leave the battery pack connected
>>> to
>>> your radio when your radio is not being used. Your radio consumes a
>>> small
>>> amount of power even when it is powered off. This small amount of power
>>> consumption can easily drain your batteries prematurely. So don't
>>> forget
>>> to disconnect your radio from the battery pack when you are finished
>>> listening to it. Your radio doesn't require any power to remember the
>>> last
>>> channel it was tuned too or where the volume level was set. These
>>> parameters are stored in nonvolatile memory.
>>>
>>> Safety Precautions and
>>> Considerations
>>>
>>> This information should be read thoroughly before the radio is
>>> installed
>>> and operated. Please RETAIN these instructions for future reference.
>>> The
>>> radio can easily and quickly be installed at any location. It requires
>>> virtually no routine maintenance or attention. This Oehm Electronics
>>> radio
>>> uses state of the art components and engineering techniques to deliver
>>> the
>>> highest possible quality noise free sound to the end user. The radio
>>> has
>>> been designed to provide many years of reliable trouble free service.
>>> Please read the following information before using this product.
>>> UNPACKING THE UNIT
>>>
>>> When you receive and unpack the radio, inspect the unit thoroughly and
>>> make sure the radio has not sustained any physical damage during
>>> shipment.
>>> If the unit is damaged in any way, do not apply power and attempt to
>>> operate the radio. Carefully inspect the cabinet for dents, warps and
>>> other irregularities. Make sure that all switches, controls and rear
>>> panel
>>> connectors, are undamaged.
>>>
>>> SHAKE TEST
>>>
>>> Carefully pick up the radio and shake it while listening for any
>>> rattles
>>> or sounds of loose hardware or other components. If there is loose
>>> hardware or unsecured components in the cabinet of the radio DO NOT
>>> apply
>>> power or attempt system operation since doing this may cause damage to
>>> the
>>> radio and possible electric shock to the user. If the radio has
>>> sustained
>>> any physical damage please contact Oehm Electronics IMMEDIATELY so the
>>> problem can be resolved. Never attempt to remove the back panel from
>>> this
>>> radio. Doing so, may expose you to electrical shock and may create a
>>> fire
>>> danger. Refer all servicing to a qualified Electronics Technician. If
>>> the
>>> radio is undamaged, proceed with installation and operation.
>>> CLEANING
>>>
>>> The radio should be installed and or stored in a relatively dust free
>>> environment. Outer covers and panels may be cleaned but first the DC
>>> adapter must be disconnected from the radio and AC power outlet. Do not
>>> use liquid or aerosol cleaners, use only a cloth that is slightly
>>> dampened
>>> with furniture polish or mild detergent when cleaning the radio.
>>>
>>> WATER AND MOISTURE CONSIDERATIONS
>>>
>>> Never expose the radio to rain or moisture and never spill liquid onto
>>> this product. If the radio has been exposed to any kind of moisture,
>>> cease
>>> operation immediately and consult with Oehm Electronics or a qualified
>>> service technician. Failure to observe these precautions may result in
>>> damage to the radio and or electrical shock to the operator.
>>>
>>> PHYSICAL DAMAGE
>>>
>>> When installing the radio handle it with care. Do not drop the unit or
>>> expose it to excess physical shock. The radio is a precision instrument
>>> which contains many fragile components, therefore, if the unit must be
>>> shipped, transported, or handled, care should be taken to provide
>>> appropriate protection from these types of damages.
>>>
>>> HEAT
>>>
>>> The radio should never be operated or stored near sources of heat such
>>> as
>>> radiators, heat registers or direct sunlight.
>>>
>>>
>>> FCC information
>>>
>>> This device complies with Part 15 of the FCC Rules. Operation is
>>> subject
>>> to the following two conditions:
>>> (1) This device may not cause harmful interference, and (2) this device
>>> must accept any interference received, including interference that may
>>> cause undesired operation.
>>> This equipment has been tested and found to comply with the limits for
>>> a
>>> Class B digital device, pursuant to Part 15 of FCC Rules.These limits
>>> are
>>> designed to provide
>>> reasonable protection against harmful interference in a residential
>>> installation. This equipment generates, uses, and can radiate
>>> radio frequency energy and, if not installed and used in accordance
>>> with
>>> these instructions, may cause harmful interference to radio
>>> communications. However, there is no guarantee that interference will
>>> not
>>> occur in a particular installation.
>>> If this equipment does cause harmful interference to radio or
>>> television
>>> reception, which can be determined by turning the equipment off and on,
>>> the user is encouraged to try to
>>> correct the interference by one or more of the following measures:
>>> Reorient or relocate the receiving antenna.
>>> Increase the separation between the equipment and receiver.
>>> Connect the equipment into an outlet on a circuit different from that
>>> to
>>> which the receiver is connected. Consult the dealer or an experienced
>>> radio/TV technician for help.
>>>
>>> WARNING: Changes or modifications not expressly approved by the party
>>> responsible for compliance could void the user's authority to operate
>>> the
>>> equipment.
>>>
>>>
>>> two Year limited Warranty
>>>
>>> This Oehm Electronics radio has been designed to provide many years of
>>> flawless high quality trouble free performance. This product comes with
>>> a
>>> full two year parts and labor limited warranty. This parts and labor
>>> warranty does not cover repairs necessitated by man caused accidents or
>>> acts of nature. It also does not cover repairs resulting from improper
>>> installation or operation of this equipment, or misadjustment of
>>> controls
>>> not covered in the user documentation for this equipment. Additionally,
>>> this two year limited warranty supersedes any other warranty or
>>> guarantees for this product.
>>> If in the unlikely event that any problem should arise During the first
>>> two years after the radio has been purchased, Oehm Electronics will at
>>> its option, either repair or replace the malfunctioning radio without
>>> charge. The customer will be responsible for any and all shipping
>>> charges
>>> associated with returning this equipment to Oehm Electronics. Oehm
>>> Electronics upon receiving the defective equipment, will either repair
>>> or
>>> replace this equipment and cover the cost of returning the repaired
>>> equipment to the customer without charge.
>>> This is the only remedy available under the terms of this warranty.
>>> Before returning any equipment, you are strongly encouraged to contact
>>> Oehm Electronics. Most radio problems can usually be solved in the
>>> field
>>> with just a bit of technical consultation. Any equipment returned to
>>> Oehm
>>> Electronics for repair, must have a written note included with the
>>> equipment, that contains the following information.
>>>
>>> 1. The name of the customer/organization returning this equipment.
>>>
>>> 2. The name, telephone number, and if possible an E-Mail address of a
>>> person familiar with the problems being experienced with this
>>> equipment.
>>>
>>> 3. The address of the location where this equipment should be returned
>>> once it has been repaired.
>>>
>>> If a radio is not performing properly, use the following contact
>>> information to obtain repair service and or technical support.
>>>
>>>  Oehm Electronics
>>>
>>>  2194C Galveston Avenue
>>>
>>>  San Jose, California 95122-3617
>>>
>>>  telephone: (408) 971-6250
>>>
>>>  fax: (408) 693-3697
>>>
>>>  E-Mail: oehmelec@xxxxxxx
>>>> Gene,
>>>>
>>>> We are an "over the air" household.
>>>>
>>>> My first choice would be to include the picture since we need to buy a
>>>> new
>>>> TV for the family soon.
>>>>
>>>> I would also be interested in getting the TV radio style you mentioned
>>>> and
>>>> put it on my desk.
>>>>
>>>> Near my desk I have been using an old style TV with a TV converter box
>>>> with
>>>> a SAP button on its remote, but the SAP portion failed a while ago,
>>>> and
>>>> last
>>>> night it seems the whole converter box failed.  I would like to avoid
>>>> any
>>>> converter box going forward.
>>>>
>>>> Wayne
>>>> ----- Original Message -----
>>>> From: "Gene" <gsasner@xxxxxxxxx>
>>>> To: <accesscomp@xxxxxxxxxxxxx>
>>>> Sent: Monday, July 30, 2012 11:48 PM
>>>> Subject: [accesscomp] Re: SAP Button
>>>>
>>>>
>>>>> Do you care if there is a picture?  Do you want to receive over air
>>>>> signals or signals from some other source.  If you are interested in
>>>>> over
>>>>> air signals and not cable or other sources, there are many options if
>>>>> you
>>>>> don't care if you have a picture.  There are converter boxes you can
>>>>> use
>>>>> to play over air television signals through a stereo or amplified
>>>>> speakers.  Many such units have a sap button on the remote.  Also,
>>>>> For
>>>>> over air reception, there is a TV radio made for blind people with a
>>>>> SAP
>>>>> button as part of the radio.
>>>>>
>>>>> Gene
>>>>> ----- Original Message -----
>>>>> From: "Wayne W Hinckley" <wwhinckley@xxxxxxxxx>
>>>>> To: <accesscomp@xxxxxxxxxxxxx>
>>>>> Sent: Monday, July 30, 2012 10:00 PM
>>>>>> Does anyone know of any currant television models that have a SAP
>>>>>> button
>>>>>> on the remote?
>>>>>>
>>>>>>
>>>>>>
>>>>>> Or next best, on the TV itself?
>>>>>>
>>>>>>
>>>>>>
>>>>>> Third choice, are there any universal remotes with a SAP button?
>>>>>>
>>>>>>
>>>>>>
>>>>>> Thanks for any help with this.
>>>>>>
>>>>>>
>>>>>>
>>>>>> Wayne
>>>>>>
>>>>>>
>>>>>>
>>>>>
>>>>>
>>>>>
>>>>>
>>>>
>>>>
>>>>
>>>
>>>
>>>
>>>
>>
>>
>
>
>



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